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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 25 Jun 2013 (Tuesday) 22:50
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Wide angle macro project

 
jonharrisphotography
Mostly Lurking
12 posts
Joined Nov 2012
     
Jun 25, 2013 22:50 |  #1

Hi all,

Hoping some of you may have some advice for a project I want to undertake.

I recently came across this article (external link) on wide angle macro, and it sounds pretty cool. Once I started looking into it, it seemed like it would be a fairly low-cost venture to get started. But given I am relatively new (ie digital only) to photography, I’m hoping for a few tips.

I’ve explored several options, but what I have decided is the most likely way forward is to mount a wide angle Nikon F-mount lens (something like a 24mm manual lens can be picked up on ebay for $50-$100) onto my Canon 5D MkIII body. This will be done via a Nikon to EOS adapter (something like this Fotodiox adapter (external link)) with a simple extension tube to produce the macro effect. Vello are now making sets for quite cheap which include a 7mm tube, around the thickness needed.

I do of course realise that I’ll be in full manual mode with very little metering or info available through the lens. Manual focus, manual aperture – all good.

So, my questions:
- Does anyone know if a manual aperture Nikon mount lens will interfere with the internals of the Canon full-frame body? I know the aperture lever sticks out the back of the lens a bit... and keeping in mind there will be an adapter and an extension tube at least 7mm long in between...
- If I put a 24mm focal length Nikon mount lens onto an adapter then onto a Canon body, will the focal length be 24mm? Or is there an adjustment factor depending on the thickness of the adapter?

Hoping someone out there has fiddled with a similar setup so can provide some guidance :)

Thanks!


Website: jonharris.com.au (external link)
Gear: 5D3, 600D, EF 70-200mm f2.8L IS II, EF 16-35mm f2.8L II, EF 50mm f1.8 II, Gitzo GT1542T + Markins Q3T, all stuffed into an F-Stop Tilopa BC bag.

  
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ElectronGuru
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Jun 26, 2013 02:07 |  #2

Thanks for the link. I enjoy creating dramatic perspective in unexpected subjects, in many of my photos. He does a good job of covering the technicals, I would just add:

Get a lens with the shortest MFD you can. It will save many of the tube hassles and limitations. I'm in the process of replacing a 16-35 (mfd: .28m) with a 24 tse (mfd: .21). Here's an example with that lens:

jmarshphoto wrote in post #16012420 (external link)
I finally found some wildflowers after months of being too late or too early. Take care everyone and keep up the good work!

IMAGE NOT FOUND
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR

OH WON'T YOU STAY, JUST A LITTLE BIT LONGER (external link) by jmarshphoto (external link), on Flickr


"Light is the paint, lenses are brush, sensors are the canvas"
6D | 100L Macro | 50L | 24L TSE
Builder of custom flashlights, OVEREADY.com (external link)

  
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ejenner
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Jun 26, 2013 03:45 |  #3

jonharrisphotography wrote in post #16065394 (external link)
Hi all,

Hoping some of you may have some advice for a project I want to undertake.

I recently came across this article (external link) on wide angle macro, and it sounds pretty cool. Once I started looking into it, it seemed like it would be a fairly low-cost venture to get started. But given I am relatively new (ie digital only) to photography, I’m hoping for a few tips.

I’ve explored several options, but what I have decided is the most likely way forward is to mount a wide angle Nikon F-mount lens (something like a 24mm manual lens can be picked up on ebay for $50-$100) onto my Canon 5D MkIII body. This will be done via a Nikon to EOS adapter (something like this Fotodiox adapter (external link)) with a simple extension tube to produce the macro effect. Vello are now making sets for quite cheap which include a 7mm tube, around the thickness needed.

I do of course realise that I’ll be in full manual mode with very little metering or info available through the lens. Manual focus, manual aperture – all good.

So, my questions:
- Does anyone know if a manual aperture Nikon mount lens will interfere with the internals of the Canon full-frame body? I know the aperture lever sticks out the back of the lens a bit... and keeping in mind there will be an adapter and an extension tube at least 7mm long in between...
- If I put a 24mm focal length Nikon mount lens onto an adapter then onto a Canon body, will the focal length be 24mm? Or is there an adjustment factor depending on the thickness of the adapter?

Hoping someone out there has fiddled with a similar setup so can provide some guidance :)

Thanks!


I haven't done this myself (nearly did and did some investigation), but there should be no issues even without the extension tube. The only thing on some lenses is the aperture control, the older manual aperture should work best. The reason this works is because Canon has a much shorter distance between the lens mount and the sensor, so to fit a Nikon lens on you need to add distance and hence can have an adapter with a thickness and no glass. that extra room means nothing is sticking into the Canon camera itself.

The lens will still be 24mm, no adjustment factor. Similar reasons, but moving a lens away from the sensor doesn't change it's focal length - same as using a tube.


Edward Jenner
5DIV, M6, GX1 II, Sig15mm FE, 16-35 F4,TS-E 17, TS-E 24, M11-22, M18-150 ,24-105, T45 1.8VC, 70-200 f4 IS, 70-200 2.8 vII, Sig 85 1.4, 100L, 135L, 400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
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jonharrisphotography
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Mostly Lurking
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Jun 26, 2013 05:15 as a reply to  @ ejenner's post |  #4

ElectronGuru - that photo is absolutely stunning!!!!!! Exactly the kind of thing I'd like to try and capture!

So does a tilt-shift lens help with this do you think or is it mainly the MFD? I realise the path I'm leaning towards involves a bit of fiddling, but budget is a factor, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering anyways ;)

ejenner, great advice, thanks! So, the adapter puts the Nikon lens the correct distance away from the sensor... so am I right in assuming that if I use the adapter plus an 8mm extension tube, it is the same as using an 8mm extension on an all Nikon setup?


Website: jonharris.com.au (external link)
Gear: 5D3, 600D, EF 70-200mm f2.8L IS II, EF 16-35mm f2.8L II, EF 50mm f1.8 II, Gitzo GT1542T + Markins Q3T, all stuffed into an F-Stop Tilopa BC bag.

  
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*Jayrou
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Location: Jersey UK
     
Jun 26, 2013 05:44 |  #5

ElectronGuru wrote in post #16065705 (external link)
Thanks for the link. I enjoy creating dramatic perspective in unexpected subjects, in many of my photos. He does a good job of covering the technicals, I would just add:

Get a lens with the shortest MFD you can. It will save many of the tube hassles and limitations. I'm in the process of replacing a 16-35 (mfd: .28m) with a 24 tse (mfd: .21). Here's an example with that lens:

Good choice , its a superb lens!


James
Flickr  (external link)
Website (external link)

  
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ride5000
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1,422 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Jan 2008
     
Jun 26, 2013 06:35 |  #6

sigma 24/1.8 has a tiny MFD... 0.18m

dunno if these are @ mfd but show some examples:


IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5182/5621430897_1dfb43bee4.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …s/ken-gilbert/5621430897/  (external link)
_MG_7478-82 (external link) by k.a. gilbert (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3081/5761231267_369cc86540.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …s/ken-gilbert/5761231267/  (external link)
_MG_8624-19 (external link) by k.a. gilbert (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8082/8290243573_853a4c5295.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …s/ken-gilbert/8290243573/  (external link)
_MG_9201-26 (external link) by k.a. gilbert (external link), on Flickr


flickr (external link)

5dc w/ee-s, rokinon 85mm f/1.4, rokinon 35mm f/1.4, rokinon 8mm f/3.5, sigma 24 f/1.8, canon 35-135 f/3.5-4.5, canon 50mm f/1.8, nikkor s-auto 50mm f/1.4, tokina 11-16 f/2.8, 430ex2, pcb e640, oc-3, st-e2, pixel knight tr332, DiCAPac WPS10, b+w 10 stop nd, hoya hd cpl, kenko ext. tubes, brolly, diy softbox, etc.

  
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ElectronGuru
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427 posts
Joined Apr 2009
Location: Oregon
     
Jun 26, 2013 11:51 |  #7

Awesome examples!

jonharrisphotography wrote in post #16065863 (external link)
ElectronGuru - that photo is absolutely stunning!!!!!! Exactly the kind of thing I'd like to try and capture!

So does a tilt-shift lens help with this do you think or is it mainly the MFD? I realise the path I'm leaning towards involves a bit of fiddling, but budget is a factor, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering

Both. The MFD is getting in there AND the lens is shifted down (think dipping your hand in the water while skimming over the surface in a canoe). Or visually, like cropping out the bottom of a huge image taken with say a 10mm lens. The top of the sky is missing, but there is so much ground, you don't care.

To be clear, I'm not suggesting you dive in to a huge investment. The new 24 IS runs .020 and is much cheaper than a tse. Just that if you find yourself in the buying process, make mfd a priority and you'll have this look built in. In the mean time, tubes are a great way to experiment and offer much better quality than cropping.

*Jayrou wrote in post #16065891 (external link)
Good choice , its a superb lens!

The buying process is taking longer than expected, but I'm still buzzed to try it out!


"Light is the paint, lenses are brush, sensors are the canvas"
6D | 100L Macro | 50L | 24L TSE
Builder of custom flashlights, OVEREADY.com (external link)

  
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Wide angle macro project
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