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Thread started 24 May 2011 (Tuesday) 00:56
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Any reason to try BW filters over Hoya?

 
Creevesphotography
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May 25, 2011 13:27 |  #16

i sold my hoya and got b+w and heliopan filters. i'm glad i made the change. better build and easier to clean. worth the expense, to me.


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aboss3
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May 25, 2011 13:56 |  #17
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Hoya Pro1 Digital is a pretty good filter for the money. I found my B+W XS-Pro's are easier to clean though. But as far as IQ, I've only had it diminish with the cheaper filters like TianYa or whatever the name they call it on eBay.
Other than that, even my $20 Tiffen filter worked well with 70-200L. I found brass to be a preferred choice.


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Mike ­ K
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May 26, 2011 12:02 |  #18

The biggest reason to avoid Hoya CPs is the occasional tendency to fall apart!
4 users complain of this problem in this thread
http://www.fredmiranda​.com/forum/topic/10037​48 (external link)

Another reason to avoid Hoya CPs is that they didn't score very well in this test
http://www.lenstip.com …arizing_filters​_test.html (external link)
http://www.lenstip.com …Hoya_HD_CIR-PL_72_mm.html (external link)

By comparison the Hoya filters performed quite well in a corresponding UV filter test
http://www.lenstip.com …icle-UV_filters_test.html (external link)


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MGW172
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May 26, 2011 15:07 |  #19

Wilt wrote in post #12476607 (external link)
But 2filter.com had a falling out with Hoya and no longer carries that brand of filter

Do you know over what? 2filter has such a great reputation.


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Cucamonga ­ Al
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May 26, 2011 15:29 |  #20

Take some sage advice from a 72 year old: IF IT AIN'T BROKE, WHY FIX IT?


Have plenty of Canons, enough ammo, enough to blow 'em to "L". Now, I just have to learn to aim.

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Wilt
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May 26, 2011 16:41 |  #21

MGW172 wrote in post #12484279 (external link)
Do you know over what? 2filter has such a great reputation.

Per background info provided by 2filter, Hoya wanted 2filter to sign an agreement stating that they would not sell the Hoya filters below a manufacturer-specified floor price, but 2filter would not agree to that. So in spite of 2filter having solds hundreds of thousands of dollars in Hoya filters each year (per 2filter statements), Hoya cut them off.


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May 26, 2011 20:02 |  #22

Dustman wrote in post #12477238 (external link)
I use ''Hoya Clear Pro 1 Digital Multi Coated'' Filters on all my lenses, and have zero complaints, soooooo easy to clean...............I would suggest to anyone, if you don't have an issue with your filter, there is no reason to change brands, if you get a new lens or a filter breaks, then by all means, try out a new brand. Both are good brands in my opinion

+1 on the Hoya Clear Pro 1 DMC Filters


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labbai
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May 28, 2011 13:34 as a reply to  @ jrscls's post |  #23

Dunno... Got only Zeiss and B+W filters. No plastics there. My ideology is to buy the best, even if it makes me pay more, eh... :rolleyes: Never had to exchange anything that I purchase for something better. Comes cheaper in the long run. Got a friend that buys cheap and then buys better and more expensive stuff time after time. Said once that he should just buy the best he can afford, gets cheaper in time... :p


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Hogloff
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May 28, 2011 18:38 |  #24
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Mike K wrote in post #12483233 (external link)
The biggest reason to avoid Hoya CPs is the occasional tendency to fall apart!
4 users complain of this problem in this thread
http://www.fredmiranda​.com/forum/topic/10037​48 (external link)

Another reason to avoid Hoya CPs is that they didn't score very well in this test
http://www.lenstip.com …arizing_filters​_test.html (external link)
http://www.lenstip.com …Hoya_HD_CIR-PL_72_mm.html (external link)

By comparison the Hoya filters performed quite well in a corresponding UV filter test
http://www.lenstip.com …icle-UV_filters_test.html (external link)

Add me to the list. Never again will I purchase a Hoya.




  
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ElectronGuru
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Jun 30, 2013 23:30 |  #25

Indecent Exposure wrote in post #12472102 (external link)
Perhaps, but are there any advantages to aluminum over brass as used here? I can't think of any.

Even foregoing stacking - Brass, sometimes advantageous. Aluminum, never advantageous?

The plus of brass is that it has 'built in' lubrication - the softer constituents rub off to fill micro uneven thread surfaces. But this only works if the brass itself is exposed (not coated).

The plus of aluminum is that when installed onto aluminum, it will expand and contract at the same rate.


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Wilt
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Jun 30, 2013 23:46 |  #26

ElectronGuru wrote in post #16079654 (external link)
The plus of brass is that it has 'built in' lubrication - the softer constituents rub off to fill micro uneven thread surfaces. But this only works if the brass itself is exposed (not coated).

The plus of aluminum is that when installed onto aluminum, it will expand and contract at the same rate.

Yeah, and the negative of aluminum-to-aluminum is that there is some level of self adhesion. I'll leave it to the metallurgists to explain that, and to explain what effect of anodizing has on adhesion.

it is a fact of materials science that the aluminum-aluminum mechanical connection binds to itself to a greater degree, whereas a brass-aluminum mechanical connection is to a degree self lubricating. It has little to do with overtightening the filter!...I have Olympus lenses with aluminum ring filters which I had deliberately NOT tightened down because I know better, yet today after sitting unused in my camera bag, the filter is bound rather firmly in the Olympus lens and I have to buy filter removal tool to get them off.


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Indecent ­ Exposure
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Jul 01, 2013 00:24 |  #27

I think he was referring to "galling," the reason for which aluminum/aluminum is particularly difficult to use for a screw-in filter application. A $5 investment in filter wrenches would be a good idea if you have somehow convinced yourself that aluminum has any over-riding advantage as a filter ring material.

(Actually, filter wrenches aren't a bad investment regardless. It doesn't take much more than snug to get ANY filter ring material to bind or at least be unruly given filters have such little surface area for our fingers to find purchase. (Waited 15 years to use "purchase" that way. Allow me to relish it.))


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pwm2
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Jul 01, 2013 00:40 |  #28

Don't replace what aint broken. It's a different issue if having bad filters.


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Wilt
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Jul 01, 2013 09:38 |  #29

Indecent Exposure wrote in post #16079752 (external link)
I think he was referring to "galling," the reason for which aluminum/aluminum is particularly difficult to use for a screw-in filter application.

From Wikipedia

"Galling is a form of wear caused by adhesion between sliding surfaces. When a material galls, some of it is pulled with the contacting surface, especially if there is a large amount of force compressing the surfaces together. Galling is caused by a combination of friction (external link) and adhesion (external link) between the surfaces, followed by slipping and tearing of crystal structure beneath the surface. This will generally leave some material stuck or even friction welded (external link) to the adjacent surface, while the galled material may appear gouged with balled-up or torn lumps of material stuck to its surface.
Galling is most commonly found in metal (external link) surfaces that are in sliding contact with each other. It is especially common where there is inadequate lubrication (external link) between the surfaces. However, certain metals will generally be more prone to galling, due to the atomic stucture of their crystals. For example, aluminum (external link) is a metal which will gall very easily, whereas annealed (softened) steel (external link) is slightly more resistant to galling. Steel that is fully hardened is very resistant to galling.
"Galling is a common problem in most applications where metals slide while in contact with other metals. This can happen regardless of whether the metals are the same or of different kinds. Metals such as brass (external link) are often chosen for bearings (external link), bushings (external link), and other sliding applications because of their resisitance to galling, as well as other forms of mechanical abrasion (external link)."

While 'galling' is applicable particularly when there is force applied to the mating surfaces, what I was referring to was not even in the presence of any force...which is why I related the example of my Olympus lenses with aluminum filters. I had removed the filters to clean the optical surfaces, and had very GENTLY put the filters back on the lenses intentionally...and after some some years of lack of use, I found the filters nevertheless 'stuck' on the lens. Which probably is explained by the statement in green.

Given the decreasing frequency with which modern lens barrels have any metal, with composites now often use, the aluminums-to-aluminum bonding that I have experienced with Olympus OM lenses and aluminum ringed filters would be largely no longer a consideration.


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nathan549
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Jul 03, 2013 03:02 |  #30

I use a Hoya HD protector on my 70-200 2.8 IS II and have never had any issue with it binding or being hard to take off. They quality of the Hoya HD is outstanding and has no detrimental effects to image quality in my opinion.

Just bought another Hoya HD protector for my 24-70 2.8 II


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Any reason to try BW filters over Hoya?
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