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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 19 May 2012 (Saturday) 11:05
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How to take sky shots with a T3i?

 
the ­ jimmy
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May 21, 2012 17:39 |  #16

teeoh717 wrote in post #14462141 (external link)
Yep, through looking around 600 seems to be the magic number. Haven't done it much myself either, but in case it's helpful for you this is an example of my first try tonight before I saw this thread:


30sec @ 30mm, ISO 400, wide open on my 17-40 (so f/4)

The stars appear to be pretty circular and "frozen", but a crop of the lower left corner reveals that at 30mm, 30sec could be just a bit too long (just as the "600 rule" suggests):


And in retrospect, as the advice here has said, a higher ISO seems important. Same shot at 3200 would probably be a night and day difference. I was worried about noise, so I kept it low, but it's not much of a picture because it's definitely underexposed.

Hope that helps.

The other thing to consider with star trailing is where in the sky you photograph, towards the equator the stars will trail quicker then shooting towards the north star.




  
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sylviadivemaster
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Jul 21, 2013 03:30 |  #17

Toxic Coolaid wrote in post #14459549 (external link)
If you use Manual Mode and go one click past a 30 second exposure you should have Bulb mode. That is where you can use a remote trigger to take long exposures. But like you said you will need a tracking mount. But you do have a "Bulb" mode.

Mo

Are you saying that if you use a remote trigger, you can get past the 30second exposure limit and be able to keep the shutter open for longer? For T3i, do you know which remote trigger would work? I am a little frustrated by the 30second limit as I am trying to do something interesting on mine




  
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Celestron
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Jul 21, 2013 08:35 |  #18

sylviadivemaster wrote in post #16139287 (external link)
Are you saying that if you use a remote trigger, you can get past the 30second exposure limit and be able to keep the shutter open for longer? For T3i, do you know which remote trigger would work? I am a little frustrated by the 30second limit as I am trying to do something interesting on mine

What Toxic is saying is set your camera to Manual Mode . Then with your dial when you turn it for a 30-sec exposure you can turn the dial one more click past 30-secs and it will show "Bulb" mode . Bulb mode allows exposure as long as you want even up til your battery dies . At this point you can use your remote to trip the shutter and count down til your ready to stop the exposure . If you have a remote that allows time lapse exposures this is the setting you use . Some remotes allow you to set timer for every exposure . Example is setting timer for say 50 exposures @ 30-secs each then you just walk away or take a break til the last exposure is over .




  
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Celestron
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Jul 21, 2013 08:50 |  #19

One point on getting focus no one has mentioned . The technique I use for focus is as follows :

1. Focus Points = Choose Center FP only in Manual Mode
2. Tripod camera
3. Put lens on AF (Auto Focus)
4. Point camera at moon when available or planets like Venus or Jupiter when available or bright star like Sirius .
5. Looking through viewer point at bright object mentioned and push shutter button down half way to focus and when the center FP blinks red on your object and the green light for focus holds steady let go of the shutter button and pull the lens switch back to Manual Focus .
6. At this point DO NOT TOUCH LENS for any more focus . Carefully point camera in direction for exposure and use a remote if available , if not trip shutter button for exposure being careful not to touch the lens .

A remote is highly advisable because you don't touch camera or tripod during exposure . If you accidently touch the lens and get it out of focus do steps 1 - 5 again . If this seems hard don't worry , after you do it a couple times it's like taking any other picture . Just remember what ever settings you change in Manual mode does not effect any settings in Auto Mode . I know some say they can manually focus better by turning the FR (Focus Ring) on the lens and if so then so be it . But the way I mentioned has always given me sharp stars better than I can Manual Focus .




  
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the ­ jimmy
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Jul 21, 2013 11:39 |  #20

sylviadivemaster wrote in post #16139287 (external link)
Are you saying that if you use a remote trigger, you can get past the 30second exposure limit and be able to keep the shutter open for longer? For T3i, do you know which remote trigger would work? I am a little frustrated by the 30second limit as I am trying to do something interesting on mine

Look HERE (external link) on Amazon, this is a remote trigger/intervalometer that will work with your camera, I have a similar one and it works well. You can probably find one for even less. Don't let the inexpensive price lead you to believe it's cheap. They do work and many on this forum have them.




  
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scottishguy
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Jul 21, 2013 14:51 as a reply to  @ the jimmy's post |  #21

Here's a pic from the 550D (T2i I think), 30 sec, F3.5(18-55 Kit lens), 18mm ISO 800. You should be able to get better than this with your model of camera, better ISO handling I think.

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7172/6800401643_0ceb72309d_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/33082648@N00/6​800401643/  (external link)
Orion from Blackness (external link) by Keith Haywood (external link), on Flickr

http://bighugelabs.com …0/ffffff/330826​48@N00.jpg (external link)

  
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mtbdudex
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Jul 21, 2013 16:29 as a reply to  @ scottishguy's post |  #22

Well 4 years later I'm still using my T1i and getting decent astrophotography images...

Seriously, look at my "Top 10" thread, a wide variety of real world examples, techniques learned from others here, with camera settings and lessons learned for each one.
Top 10 to shoot (Astronomy, non telescope)


Mike R, P.E. ...iMac 27"(i7), iPad2, iPhone5s, 24" iMac, AppleTV(160), MacBook
Canon: 70D, T1i + lens:70-200 L f2.8 IS II / TC 1.4x 2x / 15-85 / f1.4 50 / UWA 11-16 Tokina
FEISOL tripod CT-3441S + CB-40D Ball Head, iOptron EQ tracker
My top 10 in Astrophotography. . .DIY acoustic panels (external link) . . APOD Aug-5-2011 (external link)

  
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Spanky88
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Aug 10, 2015 14:17 as a reply to  @ post 14461093 |  #23

Stunning!




  
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AbPho
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Post edited over 4 years ago by AbPho.
     
Aug 10, 2015 21:04 |  #24

What I am finding is that you want your histogram (on camera) to be good third up the scale. No more than half way. This gives you the best leeway when editing. At one time I could only expose at max 30 seconds so I really bumed my ISO (I did not have an intervalometer). Because the image was exposed properly I ended up with a great image. And high ISO noise was not even an issue.

Edit: Oh darn. This is an old thread revived. :)


I'm in Canada. Isn't that weird!

  
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How to take sky shots with a T3i?
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