Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 23 Jul 2013 (Tuesday) 09:34
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Home Studio - Professionally?

 
wizard13
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 09:34 |  #1

I have been looking through the various business posts and was still left with these questions:

1- What are some pitfalls that people fall into when they launch their photography business from a home studio?

2- Any suggestions on what to include when building a studio?

I am adding a 20' x 24' addition on the side of my house. It will be a dedicated studio. It will have a half bath with a 36" vanity (room for make-up, etc). The ceilings will be 12'. It will be attached to my home office so that is where I will have my computer for all editing. Planning to have a table and some chairs in the studio for meetings and an exterior door for clients to enter the studio.

Any input any of you POTNers could give would be much appreciated since this community has a wealth of knowledge!
Thanks in advance-


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
drvnbysound
Goldmember
3,316 posts
Likes: 12
Joined Aug 2009
     
Jul 23, 2013 10:47 |  #2

wizard13 wrote in post #16146100 (external link)
I have been looking through the various business posts and was still left with these questions:

1- What are some pitfalls that people fall into when they launch their photography business from a home studio?

I don't know if 'pitfalls' is the right term (at least not for my comment), but here are my considerations and/or things I've heard from others who have done it...

A) Clients will know where you and your family live; this isn't impossible to find out anyway, but it may be a consideration

B) Realize that any parts of your studio (or in this case your home) are a direct reflection of you and your business. The exterior should be tidy as well as any areas that you have to lead them through. While a home is to be lived in, if you are bringing in clients it should be kept clean.

2- Any suggestions on what to include when building a studio?

I am adding a 20' x 24' addition on the side of my house. It will be a dedicated studio. It will have a half bath with a 36" vanity (room for make-up, etc). The ceilings will be 12'. It will be attached to my home office so that is where I will have my computer for all editing. Planning to have a table and some chairs in the studio for meetings and an exterior door for clients to enter the studio.

Any input any of you POTNers could give would be much appreciated since this community has a wealth of knowledge!
Thanks in advance-

Just thinking out loud...

Are you going to have a LCD or display to preview images with clients? Will this be separate from your editing monitor? If so, and you want it to be wall mounted, I would work with the builder/electrician to run any cabling in the wall if possible (just keeping things nice and clean) as opposed to having cables drapping the walls.

Secondly, I'm assuming that you will be using studio strobes. Have the electrian put outlets anywhere you think you might want them. This would be easier to do now than to have to pull out extension cords all the time.


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
..::Gear Listing::.. --==Feedback==--
...A few umbrella brackets I own...

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Cuechick
Member
Avatar
42 posts
Joined Jun 2013
Location: L.A.
     
Jul 23, 2013 11:13 |  #3

Make sure you have the right insurance to cover any problems. You don't want a client to trip over a light stand and then own your house! A nice bonus is, you should be able to write off the studio portion on your taxes.

All that said, I love having a space in my home to work out of. I have an amazing porch which doubles as my studio now. You really don't need as much room as people think! When I was in Atlanta I used a small sun room space I had and it was great:

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6153/6166845596_a88f627b95_z.jpg



  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 13:59 |  #4

Thanks for the suggestions / info.
I have considered the entire clients know where you live. And I have ultimately discounted it as a deal breaker. With todays technology one could locate anyone they want pretty easily.
The tidy is a good point and thankfully no problem. I like to keep the exterior clean and garden are taken care of. The only interior they will see is the studio.

The wiring idea for the TV is great. Hadn't thought of that one. Was already planning a bunch of outlest ;-)a

Thanks again!!

drvnbysound wrote in post #16146336 (external link)
I don't know if 'pitfalls' is the right term (at least not for my comment), but here are my considerations and/or things I've heard from others who have done it...

A) Clients will know where you and your family live; this isn't impossible to find out anyway, but it may be a consideration

B) Realize that any parts of your studio (or in this case your home) are a direct reflection of you and your business. The exterior should be tidy as well as any areas that you have to lead them through. While a home is to be lived in, if you are bringing in clients it should be kept clean.



Just thinking out loud...

Are you going to have a LCD or display to preview images with clients? Will this be separate from your editing monitor? If so, and you want it to be wall mounted, I would work with the builder/electrician to run any cabling in the wall if possible (just keeping things nice and clean) as opposed to having cables drapping the walls.

Secondly, I'm assuming that you will be using studio strobes. Have the electrian put outlets anywhere you think you might want them. This would be easier to do now than to have to pull out extension cords all the time.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 14:00 |  #5

Thanks for the suggestions. Any suggestions on what the 'right' insurance is? I have heard quite a few variations and just trying to get as much info about this area as possible.

Cuechick wrote in post #16146421 (external link)
Make sure you have the right insurance to cover any problems. You don't want a client to trip over a light stand and then own your house! A nice bonus is, you should be able to write off the studio portion on your taxes.

All that said, I love having a space in my home to work out of. I have an amazing porch which doubles as my studio now. You really don't need as much room as people think! When I was in Atlanta I used a small sun room space I had and it was great:

QUOTED IMAGE


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Fernando
Goldmember
Avatar
1,628 posts
Likes: 4
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Round Rock, TX
     
Jul 23, 2013 14:59 |  #6

I'm assuming you won't have any problems with HOA's, restrictive covenants, or parking?

I couldn't build a professional studio at our house even if I wanted to.


Fuji convert - Ping me if you have any Fuji gear or legacy glass you're moving.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
drvnbysound
Goldmember
3,316 posts
Likes: 12
Joined Aug 2009
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:04 |  #7

wizard13 wrote in post #16146885 (external link)
Thanks for the suggestions / info.
I have considered the entire clients know where you live. And I have ultimately discounted it as a deal breaker. With todays technology one could locate anyone they want pretty easily.
The tidy is a good point and thankfully no problem. I like to keep the exterior clean and garden are taken care of. The only interior they will see is the studio.

The wiring idea for the TV is great. Hadn't thought of that one. Was already planning a bunch of outlest ;-)a

Thanks again!!

Understood.

Realize that while anyone can find out where you live, bringing people to your home can also provide them with additional information about your home as well. Whether you have an alarm system or not, any animals, spouse, children... etc. and if you tell someone that you can't book their session for Aug 16th because you will be out of town... well, you get the idea. There is certainly more to consider than just having people know where you live. Also, insurance is fine, but not everything can be replaced.


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
..::Gear Listing::.. --==Feedback==--
...A few umbrella brackets I own...

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:12 |  #8

Already checked it all and no problems as long as I don't put a huge sign out. I lucked out in that regard.

Fernando wrote in post #16147076 (external link)
I'm assuming you won't have any problems with HOA's, restrictive covenants, or parking?

I couldn't build a professional studio at our house even if I wanted to.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:13 |  #9

Very true, thanks. Will keep that on mind.

drvnbysound wrote in post #16147097 (external link)
Understood.

Realize that while anyone can find out where you live, bringing people to your home can also provide them with additional information about your home as well. Whether you have an alarm system or not, any animals, spouse, children... etc. and if you tell someone that you can't book their session for Aug 16th because you will be out of town... well, you get the idea. There is certainly more to consider than just having people know where you live. Also, insurance is fine, but not everything can be replaced.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
FlyingPhotog
Cream of the "Prop"
Avatar
57,560 posts
Likes: 141
Joined May 2007
Location: Probably Chasing Aircraft
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:15 |  #10

An exterior entrance where people don't see the bulk of your residence would be smart.


Jay
Crosswind Images (external link)
Facebook Fan Page (external link)

"If you aren't getting extraordinary images from today's dSLRs, regardless of brand, it's not the camera!" - Bill Fortney, Nikon Corp.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
myzander
Junior Member
Avatar
28 posts
Joined Jun 2013
Location: Ohio
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:15 |  #11

Cuechick wrote in post #16146421 (external link)
Make sure you have the right insurance to cover any problems. You don't want a client to trip over a light stand and then own your house! A nice bonus is, you should be able to write off the studio portion on your taxes.

All that said, I love having a space in my home to work out of. I have an amazing porch which doubles as my studio now. You really don't need as much room as people think! When I was in Atlanta I used a small sun room space I had and it was great:

QUOTED IMAGE



As a insurance agent, (not for NY) you would definitely need to get liability coverage and coverage for your equipment. You will want to schedule your items to get the broadest form of coverages. Also you need to make sure your homeowners policy would even cover you for your home if your operating a business that has that type of exposure. I would definitely contact your agent to get more info. Hope this helps :-)


Rebel T3i, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens, EF-S 55-250mm f/4.0-5.6 IS II Telephoto Zoom Lens

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:40 |  #12

Thanks. I am planning that as stated in the original post. Thanks for the input!

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #16147132 (external link)
An exterior entrance where people don't see the bulk of your residence would be smart.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:41 |  #13

Thanks for the suggestion.

myzander wrote in post #16147133 (external link)
As a insurance agent, (not for NY) you would definitely need to get liability coverage and coverage for your equipment. You will want to schedule your items to get the broadest form of coverages. Also you need to make sure your homeowners policy would even cover you for your home if your operating a business that has that type of exposure. I would definitely contact your agent to get more info. Hope this helps :-)


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
charro ­ callado
Goldmember
Avatar
1,144 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 6
Joined Mar 2008
Location: PA
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:48 |  #14

wizard13 wrote in post #16146100 (external link)
I have been looking through the various business posts and was still left with these questions:

1- What are some pitfalls that people fall into when they launch their photography business from a home studio?

2- Any suggestions on what to include when building a studio?

to 1 - lack of perceived credibility.

to 2 - ENORMOUS windows. I'm talking commercial grade, floor-to-ceiling, aluminum frame windows. The only thing after that would be a white concrete floor. /dreamspace




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
nathancarter
Cream of the Crop
5,474 posts
Gallery: 32 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 594
Joined Dec 2010
     
Jul 23, 2013 15:57 |  #15

Hmm. I would NOT want windows; if you do put windows, you would also need heavy and secure drapes for those days where you DON'T want ambient light.

I would want:
- A large rolling garage door on one side, so you can open it to bring in large props and set dressing (or a car), or open it for "natural" directional light.

- Plenty of insulation & soundproofing in case you need to use the space for video shooting, or rent it to someone who does.

- A pipe grid on the ceiling for attaching lights and gear. Or a sliding track system like Manfrotto's, if you have a high budget.

- A dedicated, secure wardrobe & props room.

- A nice fenced sitting garden & fountain area out back. (too bad I don't have a green thumb)


http://www.avidchick.c​om (external link) for business stuff
http://www.facebook.co​m/VictorVoyeur (external link) for fun stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,798 views & 0 likes for this thread
Home Studio - Professionally?
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is mogeqq
826 guests, 190 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.