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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 24 Jul 2013 (Wednesday) 18:55
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How to make your pictures "pop"

 
milleniumking
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Jul 24, 2013 20:36 |  #16

MakisM1 wrote in post #16151275 (external link)
Why don't you post an example of a photo that you like and you would like more 'pop' and see what folks can do with it?

You will need to change your profile to allow for editing, so folks can work on your photo...

Thanx! Will give that a shot. I will post a raw file.

Mag-1981 wrote in post #16151282 (external link)
milleniumking: just try and download the trial version of the LR5 from Adobe website. You'll have 30 days to play with it. There is plenty of tutorials available, including those included with the LR itself. It really is not that difficult. Just play with it and I am sure you'll acquire a lot of knowledge and you'll be able to suprise yourself with the results.

I am going to download it and give it a try! Thanx




  
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MakisM1
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Jul 24, 2013 20:39 |  #17

Just post a 1024x682 jpeg in the forum. We don't need to get too formal... :D


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Scatterbrained
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Jul 24, 2013 20:40 |  #18

Bear in mind that if you bought your camera new, it should have come with a copy of DPP, which is Canons Raw processor. It will allow you to try out the different camera presets as well as change things yourself. It's a much more limited tool than Lr, but it's free and you should already have a copy of it handy. Beyond that, Lr is an incredibly powerful editing tool, a skilled user can do quite a lot with it and it's not too expensive. :cool:


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Mag-1981
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Jul 24, 2013 20:53 |  #19

milleniumking wrote in post #16151301 (external link)
I am going to download it and give it a try! Thanx

If u will and struggle with how to bite it, then do not hesitate to ask. I am sure there is plenty of folks here (including myself) willing to help.

The other great way to learn would be that suggested by MakisM1. Just post a photo and other members would process it and let you know what needs to be done to improve it.




  
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Allen ­ K
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Jul 24, 2013 20:53 as a reply to  @ Scatterbrained's post |  #20

This might not be of help as you are looking at Post-software like Lightroom, but the first thing...if you're expecting them to "pop" out of the camera is to not shot in "Faithful". Canon defines "Faithful" as "The Picture Style is for users who prefer to process images with their computer....The image is dull and subdued". "Neutral" is very close to this. If you're shooting Jpegs, I'd recommend using Standard, Portrait, or Landscape. Although if you'll be shooting in RAW, it doesn't matter which picture style you shoot in because you can change the style at your computer with DPP or LR. I shoot in "Faithful" because I feel it gives me a subdued baseline of colors from which to create my own image in Lightroom.


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Frodge
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Jul 24, 2013 20:54 |  #21

This is a great question. I have Lightroom, and wanted to know if there is a workflow, or order to changes tat are made to raw files.


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Scatterbrained
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Jul 24, 2013 21:36 |  #22

Frodge wrote in post #16151365 (external link)
This is a great question. I have Lightroom, and wanted to know if there is a workflow, or order to changes tat are made to raw files.

Top to bottom. ;) They are organized so that you can start at the top and work your way down, although I like to start with WB, then go to camera profile, then back to WB and then the tone curve.


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bobbyz
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Jul 24, 2013 21:46 |  #23

Whether you go top to bottom (in LR) or reverse doesn't matter IMHO. One might be more logical but end result is same.:)


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bobbyz
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Jul 24, 2013 21:48 |  #24

One thing I would add besides what has been already said is that lighting plays a bigger role. Pick one of the best Ls and shoot in crappy light and it will look crap (unless one is good in pp). Shoot same lens in good light (ambient or artificial) and your shots would require much less if any pp.


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Exposure101
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Jul 24, 2013 22:01 |  #25

Do most people really spend a lot of time editing photos? If that's the case where is the art in that? I prefer spending time to get good pictures straight out of the camera instead of hours on a computer making them better. If anything I would just do light editing- a little more sharpness, saturation, and perhaps contrast and I'm done. Can't imagine having to edit hundreds or thousands of pictures just because they didn't come out good directly from the camera.




  
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Jul 24, 2013 22:05 |  #26

Exposure101 wrote in post #16151505 (external link)
Do most people really spend a lot of time editing photos? If that's the case where is the art in that? I prefer spending time to get good pictures straight out of the camera instead of hours on a computer making them better. If anything I would just do light editing- a little more sharpness, saturation, and perhaps contrast and I'm done. Can't imagine having to edit hundreds or thousands of pictures just because they didn't come out good directly from the camera.

Ansel Adams would spend days in the darkroom (nay, weeks even) working a single image. It comes down to how you shoot and what you're happy with. A fine art/landscape shooter likely spends a lot more time on a single image (on average) than a wedding shooter. The art is in the ability to visualize and image and make it happen.

Processing the image is just one step in photography, whether you choose to do it yourself or let the camera do it is up to you.


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Jul 24, 2013 22:09 |  #27

Exposure101 wrote in post #16151505 (external link)
Do most people really spend a lot of time editing photos? If that's the case where is the art in that? I prefer spending time to get good pictures straight out of the camera instead of hours on a computer making them better. If anything I would just do light editing- a little more sharpness, saturation, and perhaps contrast and I'm done. Can't imagine having to edit hundreds or thousands of pictures just because they didn't come out good directly from the camera.

BTW: It's not a matter of whether they are "good out of the camera". I get exactly what I want out of the camera, and what I want is a solid foundation of data to create the final image. Do you think that shot on the cover of Vogue just popped out of the camera like that? No. Some retoucher spent a fair deal of time working it over. Selective sharpening, levels, curves, color correction, selective contrast and micro contrast adjustments, etc. . . . . . not to mention the outright manipulation. . . . . .;)


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Allen ­ K
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Jul 24, 2013 22:14 |  #28

Scatterbrained wrote in post #16151522 (external link)
BTW: It's not a matter of whether they are "good out of the camera". I get exactly what I want out of the camera, and what I want is a solid foundation of data to create the final image. Do you think that shot on the cover of Vogue just popped out of the camera like that? No. Some retoucher spent a fair deal of time working it over. Selective sharpening, levels, curves, color correction, selective contrast and micro contrast adjustments, etc. . . . . . not to mention the outright manipulation. . . . . .;)

Exactly, while I shot B/W when I was in my early teens (35-40 years ago), the shot was obviously a large portion of it...but then the darkroom work is where you could accentuate the dramatic. Dodging, burning, exposure, doing reticulation...that was ALSO part of being a photographer...I don't feel that PS and Lightroom are any different.


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Exposure101
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Jul 24, 2013 22:15 |  #29

Scatterbrained wrote in post #16151511 (external link)
Ansel Adams would spend days in the darkroom (nay, weeks even) working a single image. It comes down to how you shoot and what you're happy with. A fine art/landscape shooter likely spends a lot more time on a single image (on average) than a wedding shooter. The art is in the ability to visualize and image and make it happen.

Processing the image is just one step in photography, whether you choose to do it yourself or let the camera do it is up to you.

Yeah I understand that nowadays a lot of post processing goes into pictures that we see on the Internet. However, in my humble opinion, that takes the fun out of photography. I feel like anyone can just take snap shots and make them better in PP. I suppose everyone has their own method. I just prefer to spend the time taking a good photo instead of using PP to make them good. I'm no expert and I don't take the best photos but to me that's more fun and enjoyable.

Scatterbrained wrote in post #16151522 (external link)
BTW: It's not a matter of whether they are "good out of the camera". I get exactly what I want out of the camera, and what I want is a solid foundation of data to create the final image. Do you think that shot on the cover of Vogue just popped out of the camera like that? No. Some retoucher spent a fair deal of time working it over. Selective sharpening, levels, curves, color correction, selective contrast and micro contrast adjustments, etc. . . . . . not to mention the outright manipulation. . . . . .;)

Yeah that's the thing with images we see nowadays (especially ones used in ads). It's no wonder our reality has been distorted.




  
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Allen ­ K
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Jul 24, 2013 22:29 as a reply to  @ Exposure101's post |  #30

To be a photographer isn't just about snapping a shutter. Adams, and to a much greater extent, Uelsmann, didn't just slap their negative in an enlarger and exposure a piece of paper. Yes, composition in the cameras was a huge part for Adams while Uelsmann's is the darkroom, but both required post...and I'm sure, if you could ask them (Uelsmann, maybe ;)), would tell you that the creativity continues in the darkroom. For a digital photographer it continues in PS & LR among others. With the camera, you try to arrive at the best image possible but the enjoyment and creativity doesn't need to stop there. For those that truly think it does are missing out on a large portion of the journey. At least that's what I believe...


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How to make your pictures "pop"
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