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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Birds 
Thread started 31 Jul 2013 (Wednesday) 19:22
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hummingbird female in flight in low light

 
Jeff_56
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Jul 31, 2013 19:22 |  #1
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Why am I posting this agaim? :) It doesn't measure up to some of the stuff I see here but it's OK I guess. Females just don't have the color of the males and the light is bad with a lot of back lighting. I've made a dozen adjustments trying to get these critters to light up but they're flying under my porch to eat at a feeder and the trees in the background are well lit. I've tried shooting with a high ISO which works fairly well but it still requires a long exposure which of course isn't good when trying to shoot a hummingbird. If anyone has a suggestion how I might get a better lit shot I'm all for it. For some reason every bird that is coming around is a female though. They are clearly from the same nest and there just aren't any males. I went all the way up to 6400 ISO here so it's noisy. The exposure was 1/320 which I wish could be faster.

IMAGE: http://www.a-framevideo.com/hummingbird%201e.jpg



  
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LV ­ Moose
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Jul 31, 2013 19:24 |  #2

I'm fairly sure that's not a female.

Can't you move the feeder to a location with better light?


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Oldjackssparrows
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Jul 31, 2013 19:31 as a reply to  @ LV Moose's post |  #3

You have to move your feeder into the light which looks plentyful. Hummers are very tolerant of us smart humans. It may take a few days but sit still, they will come even when you are several feet from them, it can be done, you should be able to have good ss in the light in the background, Good Luck, hope to see more!


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SJC ­ from ­ VT
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Jul 31, 2013 19:36 |  #4

I agree with Moose...you can clearly see the red indicating that this is indeed a male. I struggle with light too, but only because it's usually evening when I can get my camera outside.


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Jeff_56
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Jul 31, 2013 23:38 |  #5
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It could be a juvenile male which is far less colorful than the adults. I know I need more light but getting it is a whole other proposition without wholesale changes to my setup. But I do get to see these birds in the sun. It's very easy to tell an adult male. It's very hard to tell a juvenile male because they are the same color as the females. The tiny bit of red seen in this photo is something I have seen on other birds that were clearly females (no white tail feathers and much larger than the males). Not everything we see in the nature books is accurate. I know that for a fact. I do know that the young birds don't mature until late in the fall and I also know this bird is much too big to be a male.

Just as an example I found this image that shows a female feeding her young. Males do none of the work with the young. I know many books say females never have the red but IMO they do. The males are brilliant green and red and about half the size of the females.

IMAGE: http://howtoenjoyhummingbirds.com/tatler%20mom%20hum%20feeding%20chickopt.jpg

This came from http://howtoenjoyhummi​ngbirds.com/hummingbir​d_nests.htm (external link)



  
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hummingbird female in flight in low light
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