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Thread started 17 Aug 2013 (Saturday) 11:51
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shooting the moon

 
jimkayne
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Aug 17, 2013 11:51 |  #1

tried some different settings to get a clean shot of the moon but had a hard tome getting any definition on the photo
tried different exposure settings and apeture
all came back fuzzy
have a 6d using a 18-135 zoom




  
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pwm2
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Aug 17, 2013 11:54 |  #2

Oops - you totally, completely, forgot to tell us what exact settings you tried.

Note that the moon is very well lit, even if the sky around it may be dark.

So you don't need to use any long exposure times that gives you issues with shake.


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10-22 | 16-35/2.8 L II | 20-35 | 24-105 L IS | 28-135 IS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.8 II | 70-200/2.8 L IS | 100/2.8 L IS | 100-400 L IS | Sigma 18-200DC
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digital ­ paradise
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Aug 17, 2013 12:21 |  #3

A full moon is pretty bright. Not the best time to shoot but can be done. Half moon is a good time. Careful not to overexpose a full moon. If it looks a little underexposed on your LCD you can work with it.

Another consideration is your gear. I was trying for a moon shot for years but just did not have enough mm. I follow a bird photographer from the Philippines and he stacks Canon and Sigma 2X converters because you can't stack two Canon converters. Since I could not afford the lens I purchased those 2 converters. With my 300L F4 IS it put me at 1200mm. Mind you he does this with a 500mm lens and does amazing work.

Stacking those two converters really has an effect in IQ so I had to do some creative sharpening. Also as pwm2 stated you can't do long exposures since the moon and earth are moving unless you have the gear that tracks the moon.

Moon exposure calculator.

http://www.adidap.com …moon-exposure-calculator/ (external link)

Moon phase sites

http://www.die.net/moo​n/ (external link)

http://stardate.org/ni​ghtsky/moon (external link)

http://www.calculatorc​at.com/moon_phases/pha​senow.php (external link)

I have to be honest. You may have trouble achieving your goal with 135mm lens. It is big when it rises but there is atmospheric distortion to deal with. When it is high it is a dot on your LCD. You may consider renting a 500mm lens and through on a converter. I spent a little cash on my converters and I don't use them much but a decent moon shot was on my bucket list.

7D, 300L F4 IS and two 2X converters.

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NinetyEight
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Aug 17, 2013 12:22 |  #4

Try around 1/125th sec @ f/8 ISO 200 on a tripod as a starting point. Use Live view for focus.
Be aware that the moon (and the earth) are moving pretty quickly, especially if using a long lens.


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Skul
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Aug 17, 2013 12:22 |  #5

This can provide a starting point.
http://www.adidap.com …moon-exposure-calculator/ (external link)

Sounds like the focus was off, more than anything.

Pwm2 is right about the shutter speed.

Digital Para. posted the calculator while I was typing this.




  
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digital ­ paradise
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Aug 17, 2013 12:27 |  #6

Here is a link to the fellow I learned from. He was also my mentor for birding. Scroll down and see his shot of the ISS.

http://www.romyocon.ne​t/search?q=moon (external link)

http://www.romyocon.ne​t (external link)


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digital ­ paradise
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Aug 17, 2013 12:28 |  #7

NinetyEight wrote in post #16216104 (external link)
Try around 1/125th sec @ f/8 ISO 200 on a tripod as a starting point. Use Live view for focus.
Be aware that the moon (and the earth) are moving pretty quickly, especially if using a long lens.

Exactly. You need a fast shutter speed which is causing the fuzziness more than likely.


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digital ­ paradise
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Aug 17, 2013 12:44 |  #8

Skul wrote in post #16216105 (external link)
Digital Para. posted the calculator while I was typing this.

I hate when that happens :D


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Lowner
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Aug 17, 2013 12:58 |  #9

pwm2 wrote in post #16216059 (external link)
Note that the moon is very well lit, even if the sky around it may be dark.

So you don't need to use any long exposure times that gives you issues with shake.

Not just shake, for which they invented tripods. But simple subject movement - the moon moves across the sky quicker than you might expect, so another reason to keep exposures short.


Richard

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digital ­ paradise
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Aug 17, 2013 13:00 |  #10

In live view @ 10X you can see the moon moving on the LCD. That blew me away the first time.


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Aug 17, 2013 13:04 |  #11

Forgot to say. At 1200mm I could see it moving.


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smasraum
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Aug 17, 2013 13:30 |  #12

digital paradise wrote in post #16216103 (external link)
A full moon is pretty bright. Not the best time to shoot but can be done. Half moon is a good time. Careful not to overexpose a full moon. If it looks a little underexposed on your LCD you can work with it.

You can shoot the moon when it's full, quarter or even just a sliver. It just usually looks better when it's less than full because you get the shadows at the edge of the light due to the extreme angle. The angles makes things look more interesting.

Another consideration is your gear. I was trying for a moon shot for years but just did not have enough mm. I follow a bird photographer from the Philippines and he stacks Canon and Sigma 2X converters because you can't stack two Canon converters. Since I could not afford the lens I purchased those 2 converters. With my 300L F4 IS it put me at 1200mm. Mind you he does this with a 500mm lens and does amazing work.

I have to be honest. You may have trouble achieving your goal with 135mm lens. It is big when it rises but there is atmospheric distortion to deal with. When it is high it is a dot on your LCD. You may consider renting a 500mm lens and through on a converter. I spent a little cash on my converters and I don't use them much but a decent moon shot was on my bucket list.

I have shot the moon with a 300mm lens and gotten decent shots. 135mm probably won't give you much detail. You'll be better off going for the wide end and getting some surroundings with it.

The moon is not actually any larger when it rises or sets than it is when it's directly overhead. That's just a trick that our mind plays on us. To a camera, the moon is ALWAYS the same size (about 1/2°) (other than the small variation over time due to the shape of the orbit, but the variation is not much).

7D, 300L F4 IS and two 2X converters.

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Beautiful shot!

Here's a quick one of mine hand held from the top deck of a boat on the Amazon river. Not my best, the only one that I had handy.
ISO 400, f5.6, 1/640s, 400mm

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3829/9505405537_56e0056daf_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/62319060@N05/9​505405537/  (external link)
IMG_3391 (external link) by smasraum (external link), on Flickr

Steve
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digital ­ paradise
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Aug 17, 2013 13:33 |  #13

Nice shot for hand held.


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Snydremark
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Aug 17, 2013 13:34 |  #14

What sort of exposure settings are you using? In order to get surface definition on the moon you need to keep some, relatively, high shutter speeds; you're actually shooting a "daylight" scene since the moon is directly lit by the sun (not a night scene). I'd recommend starting around ISO 100||SS 1/100||f/8 and tweak from there [taken with a 400mm]

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7148/6821047697_45c4327612_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/snydremark/6821​047697/  (external link)
Feb moon-6376 (external link) by Guideon72 (external link), on Flickr

You're also going to have a problem getting a lot of definition with that short of a lens; the moon just won't be big enough in the frame to see TOO much.

Do you have a tripod?

- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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pwm2
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Aug 17, 2013 13:51 |  #15

Lowner wrote in post #16216189 (external link)
Not just shake, for which they invented tripods. But simple subject movement - the moon moves across the sky quicker than you might expect, so another reason to keep exposures short.

Yes, but a shutter time suitable for not giving camera shake problems when hand-holding will also be good enough to avoid problems with the moving moon.


5DMk2 + BG-E6 | 40D + BG-E2N | 350D + BG-E3 + RC-1 | Elan 7E | Minolta Dimage 7U | (Gear thread)
10-22 | 16-35/2.8 L II | 20-35 | 24-105 L IS | 28-135 IS | 40/2.8 | 50/1.8 II | 70-200/2.8 L IS | 100/2.8 L IS | 100-400 L IS | Sigma 18-200DC
Speedlite 420EZ | Speedlite 580EX | EF 1.4x II | EF 2x II

  
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shooting the moon
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