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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 13 Aug 2013 (Tuesday) 10:00
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Kit vs. Non Kit lens

 
blair1955
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Aug 13, 2013 10:00 |  #1

Since the film SLRs I’ve bought the body and lens separate except my first one a Yashica TL Electro in the mid-70s I haven’t had a kit lens until now. I got my 60D with an EF 18-200mm IS lens and overall I’m pleased with it thus far. My questions is there a difference between kit and non-kit lenses? In addition to the above I have a Tamron 70-300mm /4-5.6 Di VC lens that I’m really impressed with.




  
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dochollidayda
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Aug 13, 2013 10:08 |  #2

Yes and No. Modern kit lenses have come a long way. Sure the more expensive lenses offer weather sealing, better build quality, smoother focus rings and behave better under stress. Now that is a lot to count and which is why superior lenses cost a lot more. Yes the IQ is better but the difference isn't day and night.

Some people upgrade their kit lenses expecting the above and they are bitterly disappointed. Some very fine lenses on the market today were/are being sold as kit lenses. 15-85, 24-105 come to mind. Sure you can improve on their IQ but not by much.

The 18-200 is very competitive as well, learning how to use it is much more important. there are specialized lenses that can do better, ofcourse but general zoom lens won't do a lot better in terms of IQ. Enjoy your new combo and let's see some results ;)


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gonzogolf
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Aug 13, 2013 10:13 |  #3

The kit distinction is a bit tricky. Lots of lenses are bundled together with a body, some better than others. The highly regarded 24-105 is a kit lens as its often bundled with full frame bodies, but it also sells quite well on its own. You would be better served to evaluate each lens on its own strengths without worrying about the kit distinction.




  
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chantu
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Aug 13, 2013 14:50 |  #4

The main difference - max aperture. Good high quality zoom will go down to f2.8 for the shorter focal lengths. Also, the Image Quality (thru out the zoom range) will be better for the more expensive zooms than the cheaper kit lenses. But the more expensive zoom will also have shorter zoom range (to keep the Image Quality high). If you'll happy with the quality you're getting now, stay with the kits. At some point in time when you feel you technique has improve significantly, then possibly move up to the "L" lenses.


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mark2009
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Aug 13, 2013 16:52 |  #5

blair1955 wrote in post #16204191 (external link)
Since the film SLRs I’ve bought the body and lens separate except my first one a Yashica TL Electro in the mid-70s I haven’t had a kit lens until now. I got my 60D with an EF 18-200mm IS lens and overall I’m pleased with it thus far. My questions is there a difference between kit and non-kit lenses? In addition to the above I have a Tamron 70-300mm /4-5.6 Di VC lens that I’m really impressed with.

I think I have had just about every lens for a crop, and have come full circle. As others have said, I have found you will find a jump in image q if you go to say a canon 40mm, 50, 85mm ....I found. I had canons, sigma, and tamrons, the tamron 17-50 f/2.8 slightly better, but slow focus. I found my sigma 17-70 soft, I actually found your 18-200 convent, but a little soft, and felt like I had a giant point and shoot.. Convenience wise and decent iq, I found the 18-135 best. I also had a canon 15-85, iq maybe slightly better than kit, great range, but again for the moneyersonally not worth it for me. My 70-200 L I found sharp, but for the money personally not worth it, and eventually sold them all and bought the kit lens again, all new from people that wanted to upgrade them. I find the 55-250 a gem for the price. I use my 85mm for indoor sports, ....Bottomline is your really not going to get a wow factor for the money, primes will give you more, and are fast and can give you great results. If I was making money on photography, then I would have all L lenses for the slightly better iq, but faster focus and durability.
But it is all personal choices of what worth your money




  
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philwillmedia
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Aug 13, 2013 18:08 |  #6

There is actually no such thing as a "kit" lens, just as there's no such thing as a "Kit body"
"Kit lens" is a term that has been perpetuated by various sources as a term of convenience.

A lens or lenses that come with a body to make a ready to use bundle, combo, or if you prefer, kit (eg: 18-55) can be bought separately - on its own, just like the body.
There is no wording on the lens box that says "18-55 Kit Lens." or on the box for the body that says "Kit body" so why differentiate between the body and the lens.
Nor is there any difference in the way they are manufactured - the 18-55 "kit lens" is made exactly the same way was as the 18-55 sold as a separate item.

If I recall, there was an L lens being sold together with the 5D (I think) as a ready to go package, and referred to as a kit - so now that makes that L lens a "kit" lens, but if someone was re-selling it later, you can bet your life they wouldn't be referring to it as a "kit" lens, but as an "L" Series.

In essesnce, the "bundle", "combo", "kit" lens and body combination will be more than sufficient for the uses (happy snaps, kids, family etc, etc) that the majority of people will be using it for.


Regards, Phil
2013/14 CAMS Gold Accredited Photographer | 2010 & 2011 V8 Supercars Aust. Accredited Photographer | 2008, '09, '10 South Aus. Rally Photographer of the Year | Catch Fence Photos - 2009 Photo of the Year (external link)Finallist - 2014 NT Media Awards
"A bad day at the race track is better than a good day in the office" | www.freewebs.com/philw​illmedia (external link)

  
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xeodragon
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Aug 14, 2013 02:51 |  #7

dochollidayda wrote in post #16204214 (external link)
Yes and No. Modern kit lenses have come a long way. Sure the more expensive lenses offer weather sealing, better build quality, smoother focus rings and behave better under stress. Now that is a lot to count and which is why superior lenses cost a lot more. Yes the IQ is better but the difference isn't day and night.

Some people upgrade their kit lenses expecting the above and they are bitterly disappointed. Some very fine lenses on the market today were/are being sold as kit lenses. 15-85, 24-105 come to mind. Sure you can improve on their IQ but not by much.

The 18-200 is very competitive as well, learning how to use it is much more important. there are specialized lenses that can do better, ofcourse but general zoom lens won't do a lot better in terms of IQ. Enjoy your new combo and let's see some results ;)

This. I found my previous 18-55 and 55-250 turned out excellent photos. Be happy with what you have and only buy/upgrade when your lenses are not fulfilling a need. But it's okay to have Gear Acquisition Syndrome (GAS) every once in a while :).




  
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Willie
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Aug 14, 2013 07:41 |  #8

philwillmedia wrote in post #16205475 (external link)
There is actually no such thing as a "kit" lens, just as there's no such thing as a "Kit body"
"Kit lens" is a term that has been perpetuated by various sources as a term of convenience.

A lens or lenses that come with a body to make a ready to use bundle, combo, or if you prefer, kit (eg: 18-55) can be bought separately - on its own, just like the body.
There is no wording on the lens box that says "18-55 Kit Lens." or on the box for the body that says "Kit body" so why differentiate between the body and the lens.
Nor is there any difference in the way they are manufactured - the 18-55 "kit lens" is made exactly the same way was as the 18-55 sold as a separate item.

If I recall, there was an L lens being sold together with the 5D (I think) as a ready to go package, and referred to as a kit - so now that makes that L lens a "kit" lens, but if someone was re-selling it later, you can bet your life they wouldn't be referring to it as a "kit" lens, but as an "L" Series.

In essesnce, the "bundle", "combo", "kit" lens and body combination will be more than sufficient for the uses (happy snaps, kids, family etc, etc) that the majority of people will be using it for.

Actually, I believe the first 18-55 was only available as a kit in the USA, so that is probably where kit lens came from.




  
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blair1955
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Aug 14, 2013 08:32 |  #9

xeodragon wrote in post #16206436 (external link)
This. I found my previous 18-55 and 55-250 turned out excellent photos. Be happy with what you have and only buy/upgrade when your lenses are not fulfilling a need. But it's okay to have Gear Acquisition Syndrome (GAS) every once in a while :).

Yeah I got it bad. Bought the camera - lens in June and since bought a 430ex II, Tamron 70-300 VC lens, B + W 72mm C Pol with NANO coating and just last night from a member on this board an EF 50mm f/1.4 lens on I also bought a extension tube set. But I'm retired and time to enjoy.




  
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2n10
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Aug 14, 2013 08:55 |  #10

blair1955 wrote in post #16206877 (external link)
Yeah I got it bad. Bought the camera - lens in June and since bought a 430ex II, Tamron 70-300 VC lens, B + W 72mm C Pol with NANO coating and just last night from a member on this board an EF 50mm f/1.4 lens on I also bought a extension tube set. But I'm retired and time to enjoy.

The bold and underlined is the most important thing. Let it be your guide.

I bought my first DSLR, a T3i, bundled with "the kit lens" 18-55 and 55-250. They gave me quality pictures when I used them correctly. You need to use all lenses correctly though to get a good picture. I did sell them and upgrade to the 17-55 for its speed and the 70-300 for its length. I wish I had gotten the L version of the 70-300 because its IQ is better on the long end if you are cropping heavily. I still get excellent photos from the 70-300 just need to be a little closer for less cropping.


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PH68
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Aug 14, 2013 09:08 |  #11

No matter what lens you have you'll eventually find it's limitations, something you don't like about it.

It's then usually the focal length being too short, not long enough, or even too much unused range.
Or it's the low light (or possibly bokeh) performance, in which case you want a faster (lower f/stop) aperture.

Some complain about image quality, but a lot of poor IQ can be due to the user error.


I once had the 18-200 with my 60D.
I sold it as it was forever creeping.
I went back to my 2 "kit" lens (the 18-55 and 55-250) for everyday usage, and found them better than the 18-200. The only downside was changing lenses... but you do that on a SLR anyway.
If I want something faster/sharper for a specific use, then I use one of my primes.


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blair1955
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Aug 17, 2013 16:14 |  #12

Thanks guys, I just picked up an EF 50mm f/1.4 from another member on this board and got a near perfect lens (9.5/10) at a great price with a hood and B+W UV filter! I also bought a Rebel 3Ti for my girlfriend, it’s her first SLR so now we have a hobby we can enjoy together. We both have some health issues that once resolved will allow us to travel without schedules, I almost lost her to lung cancer last year. So I’ve learned to savor every minute of time spent together. Anyway back to the lens I do like the convenience of my 18-200 for a walk around lens though a bit heavy. I have a 35-135mm lens that I bought with my Elan years ago I may take a few shots with it too. I did try it last night with different combinations of Kenko Extension tubes. I’ll transfer them to my laptop later on to be better able see how well they look.




  
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Copper ­ NYC
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Aug 17, 2013 16:32 |  #13

blair1955 wrote in post #16204191 (external link)
Since the film SLRs I’ve bought the body and lens separate except my first one a Yashica TL Electro in the mid-70s I haven’t had a kit lens until now. I got my 60D with an EF 18-200mm IS lens and overall I’m pleased with it thus far. My questions is there a difference between kit and non-kit lenses? In addition to the above I have a Tamron 70-300mm /4-5.6 Di VC lens that I’m really impressed with.

http://digital-photography-school.com …-is-better-than-you-think (external link)


40D Gripped, 50D, T2I Gripped, 5D Mark III Gripped, EF-S 18-55 IS, EF-S 55-250 IS
EF 28 f/2.8 IS, EF 40 2.8 STM, EF 50 f/1.4 USM,
EF 85 f/1.8 USM, EF 100 f/2.8 Macro USM, EF 24-105L f/4.0
EF 28-80 USM, the good one with metal mount and ring USM.
EF 28-80 USM V, EF 28-135 USM IS, EF 100-300 USM, EF 100-400L USM IS.
Rokinon 14 f/2.8

  
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jhartley
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Aug 17, 2013 16:47 |  #14

I bought my camera with the 18-55mm and 75-300 bundled together. Over all I have been happy with them but I am starting to look around for something that can focus quicker than either of them since I take a lot of pictures of my kids football games and I'll take 3 shots in a row and sometimes one or two of them will be blurry and one we be perfect focus. Other times all 3 turn out great. I've done a lot of lurking on here before I even signed up and everything I've read says the 75-300 is Canon's worst lens. I'll admit it's far from great but I can manage to get good shots with it.


70D 18-135 STM, 10-22mm, 24mm STM, 40mm STM, 55-250 STM, 270EX II

  
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philwillmedia
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Aug 17, 2013 18:07 |  #15

jhartley wrote in post #16216694 (external link)
...I am starting to look around for something that can focus quicker than either of them since I take a lot of pictures of my kids football games and I'll take 3 shots in a row and sometimes one or two of them will be blurry and one we be perfect focus. Other times all 3 turn out great...

This is more likely to be technique, rather than equipment.
1 - What focus mode are you using?
2 - What focus point are you using?

Here's a couple of pics taken using a 300D and 70-300 "kit" lens.
EXIF data should still be intact.


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Copperny, that link was a really good read.

Regards, Phil
2013/14 CAMS Gold Accredited Photographer | 2010 & 2011 V8 Supercars Aust. Accredited Photographer | 2008, '09, '10 South Aus. Rally Photographer of the Year | Catch Fence Photos - 2009 Photo of the Year (external link)Finallist - 2014 NT Media Awards
"A bad day at the race track is better than a good day in the office" | www.freewebs.com/philw​illmedia (external link)

  
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Kit vs. Non Kit lens
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