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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 17 Apr 2007 (Tuesday) 12:09
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Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson.

 
Glenn ­ NK
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May 29, 2007 00:43 |  #61

totalbeginner wrote in post #3278517 (external link)
Wow, how does that work? Do you compose and focus wide open, and then meter and shoot stopped down?

I wish.:lol:

Focus and compose wide open, then turn the ring on the lens to the pre-selected aperture (which you set manually), and shoot, and then open it up for the next shot. High speed shooting (3, 5 or 10 frames per second) wasn't even dreamed of then.

The camera had no light meter. Sunny 16 was the most accurate; that and a slide rule type calculator - by the way, one of the posters here has it available and it can be printed and assembled - still very useful. I think it's Hermeteo or 20DRoger.

For example, there were suggested settings for moonlight shots, candlelight shots, etc.

I was well off - I had a Sekonic incident light meter - which works very well - and in fact was the choice of pro photogs as I recall.

Those were the good old days perhaps, but I'm not nostalgic. But I will say, we learned a lot more about light, shutter speeds, f/stops, and film speed than anyone buying an automatic digital today.

Oh yes there was no auto focus either.:lol:

AF came along later and was for sissies.;)


When did voluptuous become voluminous?

  
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E-K
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May 29, 2007 08:16 |  #62

E-K wrote in post #3283242 (external link)
Deciding what to meter on and when is the fun part ;)

Hermeto wrote in post #3283454 (external link)
No, that is the most important part, IMHO!
Once you understand that, you can say that you have mastered Exposure..

Sorry, I was speaking in the vernacular there ;). By "fun" I meant the troublesome aspect.

e-k




  
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steveathome
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Jun 06, 2007 12:28 |  #63

sando wrote in post #3278935 (external link)
I cant see what all the fuss is about with this book.

Ditto,
I just gave my copy away, one of the most boring books I've bought to date.




  
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Glenn ­ NK
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Jun 06, 2007 23:46 |  #64

[QUOTE=steveathome;333​1166]

sando wrote in post #3278935 (external link)
I cant see what all the fuss is about with this book. quote]

Ditto,
I just gave my copy away, one of the most boring books I've bought to date.

Not everyone needs it; many, perhaps most, on this forum understand exposure.

I just hope you gave it to someone that will make good use of it, and won't show up here confusing exposure metering and focusing.;)


When did voluptuous become voluminous?

  
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Jun 07, 2007 01:38 |  #65

Love this book. Learned alot so far.


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zacker
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Jun 07, 2007 05:58 |  #66

I think alot of the stuff in the book can be found on the net....places like here for example.. Its a great book though, esp for someone who just started down the path to being a photographer... it will definetly point them in the right direction.

As for the book being boring, I was a bit bored too.... the story went nowhere.. the main characters were lack-luster at best and the the story line was a complete failure, I was expecting a big finish but it just fizzled out at the end.....;)


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Glenn ­ NK
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Jun 07, 2007 16:09 |  #67

zacker wrote in post #3335305 (external link)
I think alot of the stuff in the book can be found on the net....places like here for example.. Its a great book though, esp for someone who just started down the path to being a photographer... it will definetly point them in the right direction.

As for the book being boring, I was a bit bored too.... the story went nowhere.. the main characters were lack-luster at best and the the story line was a complete failure, I was expecting a big finish but it just fizzled out at the end.....;)

Last paragraph quite true - but oddly enough, the book seems to have a plot.;)


When did voluptuous become voluminous?

  
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ClydeD
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Jun 09, 2007 23:55 as a reply to  @ Glenn NK's post |  #68

Bryan teaches an online course, "Understanding Exposure."
http://www.ppsop.com/s​ite/enroll.html (external link)

I took the course. I felt is was worth the money. In the course he address many of the questions asked in this thread. The course also includes Q&A, in which you can ask as many questions as you want, and you will get answers.




  
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rooeey
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Jul 04, 2007 20:19 |  #69

you could spend a lot of money at that web site.
But we didn't choose a cheap hobby did we ?
I have just gotten half way through Bryan's book 'understanding exposure'
What a winner i am learning so much i just have to start praciticing...


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vondo
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Jul 05, 2007 09:47 |  #70

I just bought this book and have now skimmed through the comments. I saw a lot of recommendations for this book, so my expectations were high. They weren't met, but I don't think it was a waste either.

I found the first 1/2 of the book rather boring since it covered the same basic exposure, relationship of f/ stop, shutter speed, and ISO that I've read at least a hundred times.

In the last 1/2 (or 1/3) of the book, there was some good stuff like the various times when metering off the sky (The Sky Brothers) or foliage (Mr. Green Jeans) was covered. I hadn't seen that so concise before. And while I've seen it before, his book actually got me to go outside and figure out that my palm really does meter one stop more than a grey card.

One thing in the beginning of the book was useful and that's a concise layout of the 7 basic scenes. This is what was confusing some earlier in the thread when he said he set a shutter and then metered off the sky adjusting the f-stop until correct exposure was reached. The seven are:

deep depth of field
shallow depth of field
who cares d.o.f.

macro

freeze action
panning
implied motion

So depending on what you want to do, you either pick an f-stop or pick a shutter speed. I knew this, but it was good to see it layed out so concisely.

So, while I didn't learn much from this, I'm sure the $20 I spent will help me get a few shots "right" that I didn't before and that will be well worth it. I'll have to check out the "seeing creatively" book referenced above as that's a problem I have. Are there any other suggestions for more "advanced" photographers? I wouldn't say I'm advanced, per se, but I've been shooting SLRs with print, slide, and digital now for almost 15 years and have even sold a few things here and there.


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bpietrzak
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Aug 18, 2013 00:43 |  #71

a must read (and re-read) for anyone coming up to speed on photography


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PhotosGuy
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Aug 18, 2013 09:16 |  #72

It's certainly worth the $20 when a person is starting out. Once you get past that, try variations on this & see how it works for you: Need an exposure crutch?

And for those who ask "Why?": Post #47


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
New Image Size Limits: Image must not exceed 1600 pixels on any side.

  
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tonylong
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Aug 18, 2013 18:17 |  #73

Wow, you gotta chuckle when you look a couple posts back: 2007:)!

However, the book "Understanding Exposure" is in fact a great book, even all these years later!

I'll just say, though, that the edition that was out at the time (the Second Edition) fell a bit short when it came to addressing digital photography. Get the book, but get the Third Edition!


Tony
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