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Thread started 24 Aug 2013 (Saturday) 03:09
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Shooting from a boat - monopod?

 
OneJZsupra
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Aug 24, 2013 20:04 |  #16

I will saying one good use of the monopod will be that he has an extra hand... if he's never been on the ocean he'll need time to get his sea legs and having an extra and can help grab on to the wall so he doesn't fall over lol.


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ed ­ rader
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Aug 24, 2013 21:09 |  #17

Jon wrote in post #16236888 (external link)
Trouble with a monopod is that it'll send any vibrations through to the camera, and also any wave action, which on a 54' boat in the open ocean can be extreme. The gimbal is being used in relatively tranquil water, not even a sea state of 2.

I've always assumed that the water would be somewhat tranquil. if you are travelling through the Drake Passage in anything but good weather there probably are no good solutions, and you won't be on deck.


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eyeguy99
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Aug 25, 2013 01:36 |  #18

Thanks everyone for the suggestions and input. While the gimbal setup might be the best, I think due to size and weight of airline luggage restrictions, this option would have to be excluded.

Perhaps the best solution might be to take a monopod and a bean bag, beef up my biceps, and then roll with the punches (so to speak) and figure it out by experimentation when I get there.




  
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virsago_mk2
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Aug 25, 2013 02:27 |  #19

eyeguy99 wrote in post #16237557 (external link)
Thanks everyone for the suggestions and input. While the gimbal setup might be the best, I think due to size and weight of airline luggage restrictions, this option would have to be excluded.

Perhaps the best solution might be to take a monopod and a bean bag, beef up my biceps, and then roll with the punches (so to speak) and figure it out by experimentation when I get there.

Well a gimbal head isn't that big & heavy.

The other option is you could buy a Wimberley Sidekick gimbal (external link) for your exisiting ballhead on your monopod.


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Lowner
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Aug 25, 2013 03:50 |  #20

ed rader wrote in post #16236430 (external link)
and just how do you do that if you are on the boat? do you really think you'd be better off attempting to handhold that much gear on a moving boat?

Ed,

Simply handholding when on board a moving small boat* adds that extra "cushion".

* While a 54 footer is large to your average amateur sailor, its still small enough to get tossed around in what I'd consider normal seas.


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ed ­ rader
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Aug 25, 2013 11:21 |  #21

Lowner wrote in post #16237688 (external link)
Ed,

Simply handholding when on board a moving small boat* adds that extra "cushion".

* While a 54 footer is large to your average amateur sailor, its still small enough to get tossed around in what I'd consider normal seas.

Richard -- we'll agree to disagree. handholding the 200-400L isn't an option that I would ever recommend.


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Aug 25, 2013 11:22 |  #22

virsago_mk2 wrote in post #16237609 (external link)
Well a gimbal head isn't that big & heavy.

The other option is you could buy a Wimberley Sidekick gimbal (external link) for your exisiting ballhead on your monopod.

OK I will bit, my induro gimble is 1.1 lbs A bean bag might weigh more then a gimble.

To the OP I don't know how much time you have spent on the ocean , My best advise is learn when to walk when the boat is going up and down and side to side, keep your feet a part , and if nothing else sit down and put your back against something solid like a bulk head ,rest your camera on your knees and photograph your subject when the boat is at its calm moment . You cannot fall down if you are sitting down.


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OneJZsupra
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Aug 25, 2013 16:12 |  #23

farmer1957 wrote in post #16238386 (external link)
OK I will bit, my induro gimble is 1.1 lbs A bean bag might weigh more then a gimble.

To the OP I don't know how much time you have spent on the ocean , My best advise is learn when to walk when the boat is going up and down and side to side, keep your feet a part , and if nothing else sit down and put your back against something solid like a bulk head ,rest your camera on your knees and photograph your subject when the boat is at its calm moment . You cannot fall down if you are sitting down.
farmer

Depends on the sea state haha, also get sea sickness/motion sickness pills.....

Don't lift your feet up really high, instead kind of slowly drag/slide/keep your feet low to the deck. Watch out for hatches as you can trip and be ready to hit your head on random stuff.....

But like I said before... The boats I'm use to being on going under the ocean, so what I know might be different from what you'd have to do on the ocean in a small boat.

In case you where wondering a 688 fast attack submarine is 360ish feet long and I've def. been tossed around more than once. Good luck on that small craft, be sure to make a thread with the photos from your trip.

My parents aren't pro photographers and that got some great shots, to include a seal hunting down a penguin and eating it.


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Aug 25, 2013 18:29 |  #24

I've always found IS to be useful on boats, but I haven't had that much experience. What about a pouch or cup attached to a belt or a chestpod?

http://compare.ebay.co​m …edPriceItemType​s&var=sbar (external link)

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http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …Shoulder_Pod_Re​duces.html (external link)


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nwlight
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Aug 25, 2013 23:10 |  #25

Personally, I would try using a monopod. Worst case is that it doesn't work out and you leave it in your cabin. I just went on a whale watching trip a few weeks ago and the naturalist/pro photographer on board was using it with his 500 or 600mm lens. I noticed that he had some kind of rag on the bottom which I would guess is either to improve grip or reduce vibration. I also saw a PBS show a while back that showed a different pro that suggested putting the monopod on top of your foot to remove vibrations.

I only brought my 100-400mm on the whale watching trip, so I don't have any experience myself. However, on land, I love using a Gitzo GM5541 monopod with my 500mm f/4. I also have a tripod with a Wimberly gimbal, but I prefer the monopod now since it's easier to carry and more mobile. I am using a RRS MH02 monopod head, but I am not sold on it. The problem with a heavy lens is that it will very easily flop forwards or backwards. A gimbal is much easier to balance, but a Wimberly seems like overkill for a monopod. Something like the Mongoose M-3.6 might be better suited.




  
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Aug 25, 2013 23:33 |  #26
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You might read this thread for some good Antarctica info: https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1286597


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Aug 26, 2013 00:03 |  #27

ed rader wrote in post #16236430 (external link)
and just how do you do that if you are on the boat? do you really think you'd be better off attempting to handhold that much gear on a moving boat?

Fumbling around on a 54' sailboat on anything but a calm sea with a monopod or tripod (and for that matter - a hefty lens) will make you a liability. Between the heel of the boat, wave action (Southern ocean has a reputation), sails, lines, and sea spray, cold/foul weather gear etc - not much photography going to happen for 95% of the miles you will cover.
Realistically I do not see a whole lot of great opportunity to be swinging the 200-400 around underway. While I have not sailed Antarctica, I was researching a voyage for myself and have done plenty of photography on sailboats/boats large and small.
My $0.02 - pick the tool that will serve you best on shore - if you get to use it on the boat consider it a bonus. You are likely to have a gear limit so why bring more than you will use.


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Aug 26, 2013 09:15 |  #28

seoul4korea wrote in post #16239038 (external link)
Depends on the sea state haha, also get sea sickness/motion sickness pills.....

Don't lift your feet up really high, instead kind of slowly drag/slide/keep your feet low to the deck. Watch out for hatches as you can trip and be ready to hit your head on random stuff.....

But like I said before... The boats I'm use to being on going under the ocean, so what I know might be different from what you'd have to do on the ocean in a small boat.

In case you where wondering a 688 fast attack submarine is 360ish feet long and I've def. been tossed around more than once. Good luck on that small craft, be sure to make a thread with the photos from your trip.

My parents aren't pro photographers and that got some great shots, to include a seal hunting down a penguin and eating it.

I went thru Pamela in 76 . I don't know if I can explain how scary that storm was.

I have seen waves as big as mountains, 3 days we rode that storm out in a 300 ft ship.
I feel lucky that I survived .

sitting down, In rough seas there is no sitting sometimes you need to strap yourself down.

From my understanding there is only a short window of good weather in Antarctic.
I haven't ever been there so I really don't know.

Farmer




  
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OneJZsupra
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Aug 27, 2013 03:10 |  #29

farmer1957 wrote in post #16240856 (external link)
I went thru Pamela in 76 . I don't know if I can explain how scary that storm was.

I have seen waves as big as mountains, 3 days we rode that storm out in a 300 ft ship.
I feel lucky that I survived .

sitting down, In rough seas there is no sitting sometimes you need to strap yourself down.

From my understanding there is only a short window of good weather in Antarctic.
I haven't ever been there so I really don't know.

Farmer

I've gone through many of big storms = )

We just dove deeper and let it pass us by lol.


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Aug 27, 2013 05:52 |  #30

farmer1957 wrote in post #16240856 (external link)
From my understanding there is only a short window of good weather in Antarctic.

I forget. Is that the morning or the afternoon of Dec 5th?


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