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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 03 Sep 2013 (Tuesday) 09:40
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Extremely long exposures...

 
Photo123abc
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Sep 03, 2013 09:40 |  #1

Hi, does anyone know how dense ND filter I need to correctly expose this kind of shot during night (15 hour exposure)? I have 4x, 8x, 64x, 400x, and 1000x ND filters.

What should I use? Is there other thing involved that I should be aware of? Thanks. :)

http://i.dailymail.co.​uk …F00000578-844_964x549.jpg (external link)


You are what you eat - I dont remember eating a photographer.

  
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bsp
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Sep 03, 2013 09:58 |  #2

Hi, I am new to this method myself so I know many others will chime in with more knowledge ... but this shot is most likely a collection of photos stacked together to form one image. I have one similar and to create it I combined multiple photos, each taken with a 30 second exposure.

Try searching for 'star trails' ... you'll find a good bit of info on the methods of setup for your shots and stacking them afterwards.


Brian
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markweaver
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Sep 03, 2013 10:12 as a reply to  @ bsp's post |  #3

You don't want to use an ND filter. The idea is that you want as much light as you can get. Usually an aperture of 2.8 of wider and an exposure time of several minute/hours is required for startrails. My usual beginning settings are f/2.8 (sometimes f/4 to nail the focus better), 30 seconds and ISO 200.


Mark
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www.flickr.com/photos/​marksweaver/ (external link)

  
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Photo123abc
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Sep 03, 2013 11:16 |  #4

Yeah, but I dont mean stacking them. I mean single exposure. I took yesterday couple shot with 7 minute exposure time, f/5.6, ISO 800. Is there a way to calculate correct exposure, for example with f/8 ISO 100?


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JustinPoe
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Sep 03, 2013 13:43 |  #5

Photo123abc wrote in post #16264225 (external link)
Yeah, but I dont mean stacking them. I mean single exposure. I took yesterday couple shot with 7 minute exposure time, f/5.6, ISO 800. Is there a way to calculate correct exposure, for example with f/8 ISO 100?

There is no way to calculate correct exposure without a starting point. The quickest way to calculate a long exposure is to set your ISO at it's highest and shoot until you get the exposure you're looking for. Once you have your data, work backwords towards ISO 100. It's all math once you have somewhere to start. Every scene is vastly different though, even at night.

i.e.
3200 ISO - f/2.8 - 1 sec shutter
1600 ISO - f/2.8 - 2 sec shutter
800 ISO - f/2.8 - 4 sec shutter
400 ISO - f/2.8 - 8 sec shutter
200 ISO - f/2.8 - 16 sec shutter
100 ISO - f/2.8 - 32 sec shutter

However....
Brian is right.

bsp wrote in post #16264004 (external link)
... but this shot is most likely a collection of photos stacked together to form one image. I have one similar and to create it I combined multiple photos, each taken with a 30 second exposure.

If you are trying to replicate the shot you posted, it is most definitely a stacked image of multiple star shots. Lincoln Harrison spends lots of time shooting star trails, but he does so with multiple exposures and then once you blend them all together, they get that blurred look. Also, the foreground and horizon of that shot was taken at dusk. He blended it in with the night sky to get the overall look.

If you simply want to take long exposure shots, nothing wrong with that, I just want you to know it's now how the shot was achieved.


500px (external link)

  
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Photo123abc
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Sep 04, 2013 02:59 |  #6

Yeah I know how hes done that by stacking. But I would want to test out single exposure. I found a exposure calculator app for mobile phone, so I try that out somenight. :)


You are what you eat - I dont remember eating a photographer.

  
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SteveInNZ
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Sep 05, 2013 22:18 |  #7

If you really want to do it with a single exposure, use film. It's the one time that reciprocity failure is a good thing.


"Treat every photon with respect" - David Malin.

  
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smasraum
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Sep 06, 2013 14:39 |  #8

You may also want to search the forums for "star trails" as there are several threads. You may also get better hits by going to the "astronomy and celestial talk" forum https://photography-on-the.net/forum/forumdis​play.php?f=126


Steve
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Drive4show
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Sep 16, 2013 09:54 |  #9

I'd watch using ND filters, especially those really dark ones. With the stars moving as quickly as they do, you may end up with not enough light from them to register any image on the sensor. As well, think about how long it will take for data to be recorded, and then the Long Exposure Noise reduction is about as long as the exposure time. It seems almost impossible to end up with anything workable if you get too long ......


Hounder
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Extremely long exposures...
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