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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 02 Sep 2013 (Monday) 05:04
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Newbie would like some advice, low light

 
Joh4n
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Sep 02, 2013 05:04 |  #1

Hello!

I'm just a beginner when it comes to digital photography. My main subject is firework photography, which goes pretty good!

I would like to shoot photo's of the new firework products that will be available on the consumer market too. Those are often exposed inside a building with poor light. Last week I was at a demonstration too but the photo's of the products were all pitch black. I thought an ISO of 1600 with a large aperture, f5 would work fine. I shot in aperture priority mode. Flashing is not really what I want in this situation, neither is using a tripod.

The camera is use is a Canon EOS 700D with a 18-135 mm IS STM kit lens.

Afterwards I tried shooting at my home, inside, with higer ISO's and slower shutterspeeds, but the shutterspeeds will be so low that shooting without a tripod isn't going to work.

Please give me some advice!

IMAGE: http://s7.postimg.org/njfkd8q6z/Rubro_JW_0989.jpg
An example of the dark images I mean... :cry:



  
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olafs ­ osh
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Sep 02, 2013 06:03 |  #2

why you don't want to use flash? why you don't want to use tripod?


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Joh4n
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Sep 02, 2013 06:10 |  #3

I expected these questions. The flash is because I am afraid of getting weird images, because the products I want to photograph have mostly shiny labels. Won't the flash cause a reflection then?

Not using a tripod is mainly because there is no space for a tripod. It's too crowdy.




  
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tonylong
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Sep 02, 2013 06:27 |  #4

???You want to shoot fireworks and showing labels off at the same time? Flash would be required, for sure!!


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Joh4n
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Sep 02, 2013 07:03 |  #5

The fireworks itself is what I do mainly. But beside that I want to photograph the products as they are displayed for costumers. That has nothing to do with the fireworks in the sky, forget about that.




  
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memoriesoftomorrow
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Sep 02, 2013 07:13 |  #6

Stand very, very, very still and shoot a long enough exposure to get the shot... or do the sensible thing and use a flash, tripod or both. You need more light or a longer exposure if you already have the ISO cranked up. You don't have a choice of anything else.


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Joh4n
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Sep 02, 2013 07:18 |  #7

Guess I'll have to use the flash then.

What about the exposure? Is that something I should look at too, or doesn't add that something that can't be reached with programs like Lightroom?




  
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KirkS518
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Sep 02, 2013 07:59 |  #8

Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson (external link)

You need to spend the $18


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Sep 02, 2013 09:25 |  #9

Joh4n wrote in post #16260705 (external link)
I expected these questions. The flash is because I am afraid of getting weird images, because the products I want to photograph have mostly shiny labels. Won't the flash cause a reflection then?

Yes/no/maybe. It depends on where the flash is, & where the camera is, & your best bet would be to hold them (flash & camera) off to the side a little.

And no, I don't need to hear that you only have the one on the camera. When you run into a situation like this & see that what you tried didn't work, you need to go into problem solving mode & try something else.
Did you try a shot with the flash? If the label had a bad reflection, did you try a different angle to see how that would work? If the label still had a bad reflection, did you try a third angle? Did you try a fourth angle from a closer/farther distance?

And again, let's say that you only have the one on the camera. You don't have to use it as a direct flash all the time. If you were in a tent, you could try to direct the flash up with your hand, or better yet with a bit of tinfoil & bounced the flash off the walls of the tent. Maybe it would help enough to get the shot, Maybe not, but at least you would have tried everything that you could?
Sorry about the <rant>, but do you see where I'm going with this?

Afterwards I tried shooting at my home, inside, with higer ISO's and slower shutterspeeds, but the shutterspeeds will be so low that shooting without a tripod isn't going to work.

It's good that you did that, but if "My main subject is firework photography,...", are you saying that you've never run into this problem before this? If you have, wouldn't it have been a good idea to run this test before you were at another disappointing location?

Not using a tripod is mainly because there is no space for a tripod. It's too crowdy.

If there's room to stand there, then there's room for a tripod. Not that I think that it would help very much in that situation, as it looks like almost total darkness there & you didn't seem to try to adjust your settings to get a better exposure. What were your settings & what mode did you use? Did you shoot RAW?

And just for the sake of argument, let's say that you really couldn't have used the tripod in the usual way. You could have tried it as a monopod with the legs collapsed to be able to hold steadier & use a slower shutter speed.
And shot a burst in the hope that one of the exposures would be steadier than the others.

Joh4n wrote in post #16260788 (external link)
Guess I'll have to use the flash then.

What about the exposure? Is that something I should look at too, or doesn't add that something that can't be reached with programs like Lightroom?

LR would help & I've seen some miraculous saves using it, but as Kirk said, you really need to spend some time learning about the elements that go into getting a decent exposure to start with. In this case it shouldn't be all that hard because the subject is just sitting there.

So for now, answer the questions & take a look at Wilt's thread: Fundamentals of Exposure


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Sep 02, 2013 09:26 |  #10

Joh4n wrote in post #16260705 (external link)
I expected these questions. The flash is because I am afraid of getting weird images, because the products I want to photograph have mostly shiny labels. Won't the flash cause a reflection then?

Not using a tripod is mainly because there is no space for a tripod. It's too crowdy.

Unfortunately photography requires light. You only options are to add light via flash (or crank your iso up which may result in unacceptable levels of noise) or do a long exposure, which will require a tripod.


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kfreels
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Sep 03, 2013 08:47 |  #11

You could also go with something like this. http://www.adorama.com​/FPCL5F.html (external link)
This will let you move things around and see the effect on the labels and such.


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kf095
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Sep 03, 2013 09:33 as a reply to  @ kfreels's post |  #12

I can't see what is in the picture.
Are we talking just product photography here?
Use tripod, low ISO and long exposure. Add some light, you don't have to use flashes if you don't want to. Get portable light kit.
Where are alternative solutions, like battery operated and/or AC photo LED lights with correct light temperature.


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Tony_Stark
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Sep 03, 2013 14:44 |  #13

ISO 1600 and f/5 is not ideal for low light at all. Buy a 50 1.8 for low light. Also, learn the exposure triangle.


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bpietrzak
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Sep 03, 2013 18:45 |  #14

Joh4n wrote in post #16260624 (external link)
Hello!

I'm just a beginner when it comes to digital photography. My main subject is firework photography, which goes pretty good!

I would like to shoot photo's of the new firework products that will be available on the consumer market too. Those are often exposed inside a building with poor light. Last week I was at a demonstration too but the photo's of the products were all pitch black. I thought an ISO of 1600 with a large aperture, f5 would work fine. I shot in aperture priority mode. Flashing is not really what I want in this situation, neither is using a tripod.

The camera is use is a Canon EOS 700D with a 18-135 mm IS STM kit lens.

Afterwards I tried shooting at my home, inside, with higer ISO's and slower shutterspeeds, but the shutterspeeds will be so low that shooting without a tripod isn't going to work.

Please give me some advice!

QUOTED IMAGE
An example of the dark images I mean... :cry:

TRIPOD :)


Brad
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Azathoth
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Sep 04, 2013 17:57 |  #15

Tony_Stark wrote in post #16264871 (external link)
ISO 1600 and f/5 is not ideal for low light at all. Buy a 50 1.8 for low light. Also, learn the exposure triangle.

The 18-135 mm image stabilization system gives 4 stops (according to Canon) of advantage so using this lens is a better solution than the 50 1.8. Not so much light but you can use much slower shutter speeds.


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Newbie would like some advice, low light
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