Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 05 Sep 2013 (Thursday) 09:58
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

stitching images

 
Ltdave
it looks like im post #19,016
3,977 posts
Gallery: 24 photos
Likes: 3336
Joined Apr 2012
Location: the farthest point east in michigan
     
Sep 05, 2013 09:58 |  #1

ive heard this term in the past and i ASSUME it is combining several photos into one wider angle image...

i had to do this ONE TIME with print for a newspaper and luckily i was able to print the two negatives evenly enough that to the marginally trained (and completely UNtrained) eye, it was indistinguishable as one single ultra-wide shot...

i have taken a couple of series of photos today that id like to stitch together. i have DPP (naturally) along with PSE10 and LR5. i also have access to CS6 (photoshop right?) but its not installed yet...

are any of these programs suitable for what i want to do? i shot these images with a very slight overlap so there shouldnt be any MISSING information at my proposed joints...

ive not used CS6/PS ever, im only marginally good with PSE10 and LR confounds me. am i better off waiting until i have a year or so of 'experimentation' before even botherng?


-im just trying. sometimes i succeed

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Lowner
"I'm the original idiot"
Avatar
12,924 posts
Likes: 14
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Salisbury, UK.
     
Sep 05, 2013 10:31 |  #2

Photoshop will certainly do the job. The same basic logic applies as with your print matching, except that its now done digitally on the monitor and the image flattened when you are happy with it.

As long as you keep the originals safe, there's no harm in experimenting. How else do we learn?


Richard

http://rcb4344.zenfoli​o.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
HiepBuiPhotography
Goldmember
1,612 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Mar 2012
Location: Harrisburg, PA
     
Sep 05, 2013 10:48 |  #3

You can try Microsoft ICE. It's free and does a terrific job.


Hiep Bui Photography | Harrisburg Wedding Photographer (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
silvrr
Goldmember
Avatar
2,755 posts
Gallery: 24 photos
Likes: 134
Joined Feb 2007
Location: Chicago,IL
     
Sep 05, 2013 10:50 |  #4

HiepBuiPhotography wrote in post #16270283 (external link)
You can try Microsoft ICE. It's free and does a terrific job.

I second this, ICE has stitched a few shots that other Pano software couldn't stitch.


Past Sale Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tonylong
...winded
Avatar
54,657 posts
Gallery: 60 photos
Likes: 547
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Vancouver, WA USA
     
Sep 05, 2013 13:57 |  #5

You mentioned that you have "a very slight overlap", and that could be troublesome, since "panorama stitching" benefits from a fair amount of overlap with good detail to be "matched up".

So, don't get discouraged if initial attempts fail. There are several apps that you can try, and in an app like Photoshop/Elements there are different approaches you can take, not just "stitching", so if one attempt doesn't succeed you can try another!


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBase (external link)
Wildlife project pics here (external link), Biking Photog shoots here (external link), "Suburbia" project here (external link)! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics here (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lomenak
Senior Member
649 posts
Likes: 15
Joined Jan 2011
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
     
Sep 05, 2013 15:50 as a reply to  @ tonylong's post |  #6

Dont be afraid of using the Photoshop CS6. It does great job at stitching. If you have been working in Elements the "real" Photoshop is very similar to that..




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Midlife ­ Crisis
Member
77 posts
Joined Nov 2006
Location: Michigan
     
Sep 05, 2013 17:31 |  #7

I use Cannon's PhotoStitch that came on the CD when I bought the camera. I've done several large pano prints and a few for web and it works fine for my amateur needs. You probably should shoot manual and set your lens at 50mm for FF or at 31mm for crop camera to prevent distortion. Remember to overlap around 40% and it's pretty easy.


30D
17-55 IS
70-200 f2.8 IS
Leica M3 :p

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Smitty2k1
Member
Avatar
224 posts
Gallery: 22 photos
Likes: 33
Joined Mar 2012
Location: Washington DC
     
Sep 05, 2013 19:56 |  #8

I've had the best luck with PTGUI. It is very powerful, but has a steep learning curve (and price)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
WhenIWake
Member
Avatar
223 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 7
Joined May 2011
Location: Scotland
     
Sep 05, 2013 21:27 |  #9

HiepBuiPhotography wrote in post #16270283 (external link)
You can try Microsoft ICE. It's free and does a terrific job.

I was loving ICE until I started looking closely. I was getting issues with lines and markings where the photos stitched (admittedly my fault for not being on Manual but AV mode :oops:) which PS did not seem to have issues with. But these could be edited out for the most part.
But I was getting mismatches on alignments, photo looked fine, until i looked closely at the brick pattern on the ground and noticed it was off.
Another shot there was a fence line around the image, and again at one point it had totally screwed the fence but the rest of the image looked fine? Dont understand how it was doing this. Again PS was not having these issues.


5D II | 40D | 350D | Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 | Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4.0-5.6 IS USM | EF 35mm f/1.4L
flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
inkista
Senior Member
Avatar
673 posts
Likes: 85
Joined Oct 2007
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
     
Sep 12, 2013 23:26 as a reply to  @ WhenIWake's post |  #10

tonylong wrote in post #16270833 (external link)
You mentioned that you have "a very slight overlap", and that could be troublesome, since "panorama stitching" benefits from a fair amount of overlap with good detail to be "matched up".

So, don't get discouraged if initial attempts fail. ...

+1. It's best to have at least 1/3 of the frame overlapping, whether you're shooting rows or columns or both. If there are a lot of moving subjects in the images as well, it may be better to have more overlap than less, to assist in editing out ghosts and clones (external link), and you may want to make a few additional coverage shots via time as well as space.

Generally, my mantra when shooting panos is "manual manual manual": Manual exposure mode, manual focus (so the focus point doesn't shift between member images), and a "manual" (i.e., non-auto) white balance setting, so there's no color shift between member images. You're also far better off rotating the camera/lens than shifting the placement of the camera.

Smitty2k1 wrote in post #16271557 (external link)
I've had the best luck with PTGUI. It is very powerful, but has a steep learning curve (and price)

Again, +1, but probably overkill for what you want to do. I'd say start with Photoshop's Photomerge function, and if that isn't working for you, then you may want to consider the open source package, Hugin (external link).

Photostitch and ICE are good for starting out with panoramas, but they're fairly limited in how much control you have over the final stitch, and the results can be less than optimal.

I shoot 360x180/full spherical panos with coverage in all directions, and I shoot the member images with a fisheye lens. Very few stitchers can handle this extreme a pano task, but both Hugin and PTGui can.


I'm a woman. I shoot with a Fuji X100T, Panasonic GX-7, Canon 5DmkII, and 50D. flickr stream (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lowner
"I'm the original idiot"
Avatar
12,924 posts
Likes: 14
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Salisbury, UK.
     
Sep 13, 2013 03:21 |  #11

tonylong wrote in post #16270833 (external link)
You mentioned that you have "a very slight overlap", and that could be troublesome, since "panorama stitching" benefits from a fair amount of overlap with good detail to be "matched up".

So, don't get discouraged if initial attempts fail. There are several apps that you can try, and in an app like Photoshop/Elements there are different approaches you can take, not just "stitching", so if one attempt doesn't succeed you can try another!

Interesting comment. I always manually stitch my images and have never tried any "automatic" software.


Richard

http://rcb4344.zenfoli​o.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tonylong
...winded
Avatar
54,657 posts
Gallery: 60 photos
Likes: 547
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Vancouver, WA USA
     
Sep 13, 2013 11:31 |  #12

Lowner wrote in post #16292862 (external link)
Interesting comment. I always manually stitch my images and have never tries any "automatic" software.

Richard, can you run down what you do to "manually stitch" your images?


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBase (external link)
Wildlife project pics here (external link), Biking Photog shoots here (external link), "Suburbia" project here (external link)! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics here (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lowner
"I'm the original idiot"
Avatar
12,924 posts
Likes: 14
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Salisbury, UK.
     
Sep 13, 2013 12:09 |  #13

Tony,

Simply drag and drop an image onto another and just play with the positioning until the overlap is clean. I start with a background that will easily cover the completed image and have the dropped image so that I can see through it to the underneath image. As each extra layer is right I flatten it down. Provided there's no lens distortion issues its easy enough, just very time consuming.


Richard

http://rcb4344.zenfoli​o.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
chauncey
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
9,696 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 462
Joined Jun 2007
Location: MI/CO
     
Sep 13, 2013 16:52 as a reply to  @ Lowner's post |  #14

Tony, I kinda do what Richard does...take one image and increase the canvas size I guess will be big enough>drag and drop successive images in place until they line up, using image warp should it be necessary>over and over again.
It's sometimes necessary to do some color alterations to the successive images using the color sampler tool and curve layers to match the RGB numbers.
Trust me when I say they whole thing is a real PITA but a great learning experience in Photoshop. ;)


The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/c​hauncey43 (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,078 views & 0 likes for this thread
stitching images
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is elkaboing
873 guests, 246 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.