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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 05 Sep 2013 (Thursday) 07:37
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How is TAMRON SP AF 90mm F2.8 Di MA

 
metalkapil
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Sep 05, 2013 07:37 |  #1

I am new to photography.
I am searching for a macro lens.

How is TAMRON SP AF 90mm F2.8 Di MACRO 272E?
ebay is $349.




  
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rrblint
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Sep 05, 2013 08:48 |  #2

Welcome to POTN.:) You might want to try posting your lens question in the lens forum HERE as you will likely get more responses there.


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metalkapil
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Sep 06, 2013 11:00 |  #3

Ok.let me update this question.

How is
TAMRON SP AF 90mm F2.8 Di MACRO 272E
vs.
Tamron AF 60mm f/2 SP Di II LD [IF] Macro?

I have tamron 18-270 f3.5-6.3 di ii vc pzd.
and i am thinking of buying
Tamron AF 70-300/4-5.6 Di LD MACRO A17.
Is it a good decision to make?

Is 1:1 is good over 1:2 for beginner?
Or should I buy 1:1 for long perspective view for future?

So, please suggest.Have a nice day.




  
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tat3406
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Sep 06, 2013 21:53 |  #4

metalkapil wrote in post #16273241 (external link)
Ok.let me update this question.

How is
TAMRON SP AF 90mm F2.8 Di MACRO 272E
vs.
Tamron AF 60mm f/2 SP Di II LD [IF] Macro?

I have tamron 18-270 f3.5-6.3 di ii vc pzd.
and i am thinking of buying
Tamron AF 70-300/4-5.6 Di LD MACRO A17.
Is it a good decision to make?

Is 1:1 is good over 1:2 for beginner?
Or should I buy 1:1 for long perspective view for future?

So, please suggest.Have a nice day.

What subject u want to shoot?
If you wan to shoot small bugs like ants , you need at least 1:1.
If you shooting handheld, choose the lens have VC.
Never buy tamron lens, unable to help to suggest which lens is better. But 90mm macro have very goo review from users. My friend used 70-300 for butterfly and flower and the result is decent.


6D, 100L,24-70 F4L, 40mm pancake, 70-300L
Carl Zeiss MP 50
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/tat3406/ (external link)

  
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metalkapil
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Sep 10, 2013 19:25 |  #5

flowers and plant stuff.Sometime, animals too.
Thanx.I should be looking for 1:1 and a good 1 apart from tamron.
And what about sigma?Its cheap though and does it have a cheap quality?




  
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metalkapil
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Sep 10, 2013 19:25 |  #6

flowers and plant stuff.Sometime, animals too.
Thanx.I should be looking for 1:1 and a good 1 apart from tamron.
And what about sigma?Its cheap though and does it have a cheap quality?




  
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paddler4
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Sep 10, 2013 19:34 as a reply to  @ metalkapil's post |  #7

Most--maybe all--zoom lenses marked macro are nowhere close to true macro (1:1).

60 mm is very short for bugs, particularly on a FF camera. I would go with 90 if those are the only two you are considering.

If you shooting handheld, choose the lens have VC.

Convential VC is virtually useless as you approach 1:1. It corrects for angular motion, which has smaller effects as distance decreases. The real killer for macro work is motion parallel to the sensor. AFAIK, the only system that also adjusts for that motion is the hybrid IS in the Canon 100mmL. However, flowers you can do with a tripod, and bugs are often done with flash, which takes care of motion.


Check out my photos at http://dkoretz.smugmug​.com (external link)

  
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tat3406
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Sep 10, 2013 19:46 |  #8

metalkapil wrote in post #16286268 (external link)
flowers and plant stuff.Sometime, animals too.
Thanx.I should be looking for 1:1 and a good 1 apart from tamron.
And what about sigma?Its cheap though and does it have a cheap quality?

Sigma have few macro lens, the best is 150mm and 105mm macro, but they are not "cheap". If you talk about zoom lens macro, they cant achieve 1:1.

If your subject include animal, I suggest get FL 100mm or above for longer working distance, 50mm and 60mm is too near to the subject.(sometime 100mm also not enough for me)


6D, 100L,24-70 F4L, 40mm pancake, 70-300L
Carl Zeiss MP 50
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/tat3406/ (external link)

  
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metalkapil
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Sep 10, 2013 20:34 |  #9

OK. how about this one?
SIGMA 105mm F2.8 EX MACRO?




  
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tat3406
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Sep 11, 2013 00:49 |  #10

metalkapil wrote in post #16286462 (external link)
OK. how about this one?
SIGMA 105mm F2.8 EX MACRO?

Please look though this thread for the example photo.
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=229362

The lens is on par with Tamron 90mm F2.8 macro. Why not consider canon EF 100mm f2.8 macro? These few lens all good in macro, go to the shop and try it is the best way to choose one. I prefer canon one because the internal focusing, the front element not zoom in and out when focusing.


6D, 100L,24-70 F4L, 40mm pancake, 70-300L
Carl Zeiss MP 50
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/tat3406/ (external link)

  
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metalkapil
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Sep 11, 2013 04:06 |  #11

Thanx tat3406.

SIGMA 105mm F2.8 EX MACRO is this differ from Sigma EX DG 105 mm f/2.8 Lens?
without DG and with DG?

ALso, will SIGMA 105mm F2.8 EX MACRO(for canon) be compitable with canon 7d?

for canon 100mm $250 around
for sigma 105mm $100
so looking for sigma.




  
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amfoto1
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Sep 11, 2013 12:10 |  #12

Most true macro lenses are excellent and the vast majority now can do 1:1 magnification.

Tamron has a long, rich history with their macro lenses. The 90mm is excellent and affordable. They actually offer two versions right now... the cheaper one you are looking at is the older one and they also offer a brand new version of the 90mm with faster focus (USD) and stabilization (VC) added. The 90mm lens can be used on crop and full frame DSLRs.

The Canon 60mm macro is a relatively recent model, too, just a year or so old now. It is unusual for a macro in that it has an f2.0 aperture, which some might find make it more useful for non-macro purposes such as portraiture. Almost no other macro lenses have any larger than f2.8 aperture, so this Tamron is a full stop faster lens. It is quite compact and crop only. It doesn't have the faster USD focus or stabilization (VC), sells for a little more than the older Tammy 90mm, but considerably less than the 90mm USD VC.

I have had several of the older manual focus 90mm macros over the years and they have been top quality. Below is a sample image from a vintage manual focus Tamron SP 90mm f2.5 that I have now and have adapted for use on my modern DSLRs, and a shot showing the lens mounted on one of my Canon cameras...

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5125/5283068575_5d2187dd6f_z.jpg
IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5017/5453385847_10a2a40bec.jpg

Again, the 90mm macro above is a vintage, manual focus (and manual aperture) lens that's been adapted for use on Canon (it's interchangeable mount is neat, allows me to use it on several vintage film cameras I keep, too). I think it's safe to say you can expect at least as good image quality from the modern AF capable Tamron 90mm lenses you are considering!

I've also just recently picked up the Tamron 60mm f2.0 Macro lens to try it out. My main reasons for buying it are that it is a compact, versatile lens and it might replace three lenses in my camera bag (a macro, a 50/1.4 and an 85/1.8), to serve both as a macro and as a portrait lens. I don't have any macro shots done with it uploaded anywhere yet, but here are a couple non-macro shots were made with it...

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3754/9545958309_2283464968_z.jpg
IMAGE: http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2891/9545959419_1cf621e813_z.jpg

It's true, a shorter macro lens like the 60mm puts you closer to your subjects. That might make it more difficult to get shots of shy bugs at high magnifications or you might accidentally cast a shadow over the subject. However, it's a very compact and light weight lens. And I find most people over-estimate how high magnification they will be needing, so don't necessarily need to get all that close much of the time, anyway.

Another concern I had was focus speed, since the 60mm hasn't been updated with Tamron's new, faster USD focus drive yet (similar to Canon USM and Sigma HSM). By their very nature, macro lenses have to move their focus groups a long, long way to go all the way from 1:1 magnification to infinity. The 60mm isn't bad.... focus is plenty fast for many things. But it's not a sports lens. I tried shooting some sequences with it, of a 3 year old on a swing or coming down a slide (using sports techniques on a fast-focsuing 7D). It didn't keep up with faster moving subjects, so most of those shots missed focus.

However, 60mm is pretty short to be using for faster moving sports anyway. Focus was plenty fast for slower moving subjects. The background blur possible in portraits or macro is very nice for a lens with a 7-bladed aperture. It also uses 55mm filters, which isn't a size any of the other lenses in my Canon kit use. But, I don't use find need for filters often when shooting macro, anyway.

Keep in mind that the 60mm is only usable on crop cameras (same as the Canon EF-S 60mm), while the 90mm (and Canon 100mm) is useable on both crop and full frame.

Another of my favorite macro lenses is the Canon 100/2.8 USM Macro. It's a very full featured lens with great build quality and top image quality. Here's a sample shot with it, and a picture of the lens on one of my cameras with a flash, similar to what was used to take the shot of the praying mantis...

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5007/5310747604_24629e0980_z.jpg
IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7033/6772540431_47da554ceb.jpg

The Canon 100mm has almost every possible feature you might want on a macro lens.... It's USM focus drive is relatively fast, and is complemented with a Focus Limiter switch that can further help with focus speed in certain situations. It can be used for non-macro purposes with little concern, though I wouldn't use it for fast moving sports photography. It is also an Internal Focusing (IF) lens, which means it doesn't change in length when focused closer. Many macro lenses grow a whole lot longer when focused, which can significantly reduce working distance and change the balance of lens and camera. A key consideration for me is that the 100/2.8 can be fitted optionally with a tripod mounting ring. To my knowledge, none of the thrid party macro lenses around this focal length can be (not very necessary with a small lens such as the 60mm, though).

The more expensive Canon 100/2.8L IS also offers top image quality and is even more full-featured with everything the older lens offers, plus IS. Realistically, for macro shooting stabilization only can do so much, perhaps a stop's worth. At non-macro distances you might expect more help from IS... 3 to 4 stops worth, probably. (Note: the IS on this Canon is a hybrid form that's actually better than stabilization on most other macro lenses, that give virtually no real help at higher magnifications.) The 100L IS also offers a somewhat more sophisticated Focus Limiter (three settings, compared to two settings on the older Canon 100 macro). Of course, the 100L IS costs a whole lot more.

The main drawback to the Canon 100/2.8 lenses is their relatively large size and weight. That's the only reason I don't simply carry my 100mm all the time, and why I've got the Tamron 60mm (and the vintage 90mm, that I bought used for very little money).

I have not used the Sigma macro lenses (50/2.8, 70/2.8, 105/2.8 OS, 150mm, 180mm), but am confident they are excellent, too. All the Sigma 105mm are DG, which simply means they are usable on both crop and full frame cameras. If you shop used, you might come across an older one from the days of film, before digital, and before Sigma began using the DG (crop & FF) and DC (crop only) designations. If it's EF mount, it will fit on your Canon (but be aware that in years passed there were some issues with auto focus on older Sigma lenses not working on more recent Canon cameras, so be sure to test any used Sigma lenses on your camera before buying). There was an older version of the 105mm without OS (stabilization), and - I don't know for certain - there might even be an older one without HSM (which similar to Canon's USM focus drive). But the currently available version from Sigma is the 105mm f2.8 DG HSM OS.

I am sure, as well, that the Tokina macros (35mm, 100/2.8) are quite capable, too. I have used numerous other Tokina lenses, but not their macros.

I don't have a photo showing all six of the macro lenses I use personally in my Canon kit. This image shows the Canon 100/2.8 USM (left rear), Canon 180/3.5L (right rear), Canon TS-E 45/2.8 (left front) and vintage Tamron SP 90/2.5 (right front). Not shown are my MP-E 65mm and Tamron 60mm. ...

IMAGE: http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4150/5431199189_c627731786_o.jpg


The 180mm, TS-E 45mm and MP-E 65mm are all rather specialized and not lenses I'd typically recommend to someone just starting out in macro and most likely wanting a more general purpose lens.

I mostly only use the Canon 180/3.5L Macro lens on full frame cameras. It's a bit long for use on a cropper such as 7D, but it's got great image quality and can be useful with scarier subjects, things that bite, sting and are poisonous...

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5093/5585285923_f2d1d237aa_z.jpg

The Canon TS-E 45mm is a Tilt Shift lens. These are lens movements that allow for the plane of focus to be tilted to get more (or less) of the subject in focus, and/or for the image to be shifted perhaps to avoid reflections or for other reasons. I use it mostly in studio, for small product, tabletop shots. It's great for that. It and the TS-E 90mm aren't really macro lenses, but they do focus very close and can be made to focus even closer with macro extension rings. The TS-E lenses are all manual focus only.

The Canon MP-E 65mm is perhaps the most specialized of all. It's an ultra high magnification lens. In fact, it can't be used for non-macro purposes, doesn't focus to infinity or even to short portrait distances. It starts where most other macro lenses leave off - at 1:1 or lifesize magnification - and goes up to 5:1 or 5X life size magnification. To put it in perspective, you can essentially fill the image area on a 7D with a grain of rice, with this lens. Very cool, but highly specialized and not very versatile. Much of what you might photograph with this lens is a normally "unseen world", smaller than you would normally notice with your naked eye. The MP-E lens is manual focus only and nearly triples in length when focused to it's highest magnification.

I'd recommend staying with lenses that can do up to 1:1 and within the focal length range from 60mm to 105mm. Lense with focal lengths shorter than this are more typically used for indoor, studio work, very close to small subjects. Longer focal length macros are more "tripod only", more difficult to hold steady, especially if used on a crop camera such as 7D. Longer lenses also render shallower depth of field (the area in focus in the shot of the golden bee above is only a few mm deep), which forces you to stop the lens down more, in turn causing you to use slower shutter speeds and making the lens even more challenging to hold steady.

Even within my recommended limitations, you have a lot to choose among:

Canon EF-S 60mm f2.8 USM (crop only)
Tamron SP 60mm f2.0 (crop only)
Sigma 70mm f2.8
Tamron 90mm f2.8
Tamron 90mm f2.8 USD VC
Tokina 100mm f2.8
Canon 100mm f2.8 USM
Canon 100mm f2.8L USM IS
Zeiss 100/2.0 ZE (manual focus only)
Sigma 105mm f2.8 HSM OS

Of the above, as far as I know only the two Canon 100mm can be fitted with tripod mounting rings (optionally). Many of the lenses above are not as large as the Canon, though, so it might not be as necessary to have a tripod ring.

Beyond my recommendations, there are also:

Tokina 35/2.8 (crop only)
Canon TS-E 45mm
Canon 50/2.5 "Compact Macro" (1:2, unless used with adapter)
Sigma 50/2.8
Zeiss 50/2.0 ZE (manual focus only)
Canon MP-E 65mm
Canon TS-E 90mm
Sigma 150/2.8 HSM OS
Canon 180/3.5L USM
Sigma 180/2.8 HSM OS
Tamron 180/3.5

Of the above, the 150mm and 180mm are all provided with a tripod mounting ring. None of the others can be fitted with one.

The two TS-E lenses are not true macro lenses, but are quite close focusing and can give higher magnification, into the true macro range, with the addition of macro extension tubes.

Since it's a crop sensor camera, any of the above lenses will mount just fine on your 7D, so long as they have either an EF or EF-S mount. (I.e., so long as they are Canon EF or EF-S or third party lenses "for Canon".)

Have fun shopping!

Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
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tat3406
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Sep 11, 2013 19:47 |  #13

metalkapil wrote in post #16287181 (external link)
Thanx tat3406.

SIGMA 105mm F2.8 EX MACRO is this differ from Sigma EX DG 105 mm f/2.8 Lens?
without DG and with DG?

ALso, will SIGMA 105mm F2.8 EX MACRO(for canon) be compitable with canon 7d?

for canon 100mm $250 around
for sigma 105mm $100
so looking for sigma.


Sigma "DG" mean for full frame, crop body like 7D can use it. I think Sigma 105 macro have only two version one with OS and one without OS. OS is same like canon IS.
Amfoto above give you very detail about some macro lens in the market:D


6D, 100L,24-70 F4L, 40mm pancake, 70-300L
Carl Zeiss MP 50
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/tat3406/ (external link)

  
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metalkapil
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Sep 12, 2013 06:54 |  #14

@amfoto1 Thank you for such a great information.Very very appreciated.Sir, your small world is really beautiful.

@tat3406 Thank you.




  
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How is TAMRON SP AF 90mm F2.8 Di MA
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