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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 10 Sep 2013 (Tuesday) 07:19
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back button auto focus...

 
dave_bass5
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Sep 11, 2013 08:43 |  #61

I personally think its a bit over hyped. If definitely has its uses but i cant see the benefit of using it all the time for everything.
Saying that, i have mine set to AF-Off and find that is more useful for me.


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apersson850
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Sep 11, 2013 08:58 as a reply to  @ dave_bass5's post |  #62

It seems we are all different...
Me holding my camera.

IMAGE: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-toypuVKAiNo/UjB2V3EjENI/AAAAAAAASio/cRz-ZjuYoG8/s400/DSC_0137.JPG

Thumb tip is right over the AF-ON button.

I agree with Dave in that I find it mainly useful when using Servo AF for action shooting.

Anders

  
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Nighthound
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Sep 11, 2013 09:58 |  #63

apersson850 wrote in post #16285829 (external link)
But this isn't true if you rest for a moment on half-press. Then it has the same effect as pressing AF-ON a moment before pressing the trigger button.

It has more to do with the tapping and triggering that is done when shooting a moving target, especially one not traveling exactly perpendicular to your position. With my Mark IV I find the rear button while still needing to be pressed repeatedly to reacquire focus as the distance of the subject changes, allows me to keep a much better hold on focus and get better results with fewer focus taps. I use the method for shooting wildlife action, I've noticed greatly improved focus especially on birds in flight. I didn't like the feel of BBF at first, it was an unfamiliar way of gripping and triggering. It didn't take long to get comfortable with the change. Since I'm hand holding at 500mm+ every mechanical and technique advantage helps. The results I get using BBF is so much better for my needs that I can't imagine switching back to shutter focus.


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apersson850
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Sep 11, 2013 10:32 as a reply to  @ Nighthound's post |  #64

I understand the ergonomical advantage. But there's no technical difference to the camera, between half-press and pressing AF-ON.


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Fernando
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Sep 11, 2013 10:40 |  #65

I prefer it as it's how I've done it with all my DSLRs. The only problem I have is if I hand my camera to my wife. Oops, no focus for her. She's learned to look at the settings and make sure it's on P.

-F


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Sep 11, 2013 10:43 as a reply to  @ Fernando's post |  #66

My 10 year old has already acclimated to the new settings. :)

I was teaching a bit of DOF control with her this weekend, showing how pulling her subject off an old doorway a bit with her kit lens can still render a 3D look by blurring the door. She immediately remembered to use the back button to focus, I was pleased!


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Scrumhalf
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Sep 11, 2013 10:49 |  #67

Haha.. get them trained early! My son has a SX50HS, so no BBF there. He did get used to it when he grabbed my 7D and 100-400 recently on our pelagic birding trip and he had burned through 2 batteries on his camera. :)


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Sep 11, 2013 11:05 |  #68

apersson850 wrote in post #16287979 (external link)
I understand the ergonomical advantage. But there's no technical difference to the camera, between half-press and pressing AF-ON.

I make no judgement on ergonomics, I fine neither method uncomfortable. I won't debate the technical as even Canon can say conclusively if a difference exists. All I know is that the proof is in the pudding, results are all that matter. One other advantage that I like and forgot to mention is the ability to "lock" focus and recompose a still shot. Much quicker than changing focus points in the viewfinder in order to keep the subject in focus when taking the shot.

Here's Art Morris' take on BBF.
http://www.birdsasart-blog.com …9/13/rear-focus-tutorial/ (external link)


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Sep 11, 2013 11:09 |  #69

some interesting explanations here, I think I might set it up for one of the custom functions I never use. Give it a try with the kids running around. I don't usually shoot action or birds etc. land/city scape, studio, food, still life is what I mostly do, street I usually shoot with my phone or G12.

I somewhat doubt I'll be a convert, but I'll give it an other try :-)


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Sep 11, 2013 12:11 as a reply to  @ phantelope's post |  #70

I use it any time I am in AI servo, because it allows me to be more artistic in my composition and control where in the photo I want the focus.

For example, I was out shooting some birds around my house. It would be ludicrous to have One Shot turned on, so I would walk around with AI Servo. For me to get a bird taking off, I would focus on the bird, then just wait and snap the shot as soon as I see it twitch. So my options are to either half-press the shutter on the branch and wait, or prefocus on the branch, let go of the shutter, then when the bird twitches, hope that the AF that kicks in again keeps the lock, or I can just focus on the branch with the back button, and just wait. The shutter only has to meter and fire the shutter, no AF needed, no buttons being held down.

IMAGE: http://teamspeed.smugmug.com/Animals/In-the-Wild-Yonder/i-XqTpmsS/0/XL/5P1B1094-XL.jpg

Same thing for alot of sports, I can pre-focus somewhere else in the scene, recompose and take the shot, especially if the area to be in focus falls outside the AF spread.

Also as many of you know, AF might be faster on the center AF point and much less responsive/accurate elsewhere, so if you can focus with your center point, recompose and then take the shot, you will most likely end up with more keepers than using outer points. Sure you could go to One Shot, then aim at the subject, half press to focus, then recompose and take the shot, but if you are doing mixed shooting, you would have to go back to AI servo. Seems like alot of needless thrashing in my opinion...

There are other ways to shoot this, but I find this the most convenient and much less changing of settings, etc. You get both AI Servo and One Shot all in one button.

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flashpoint99
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Sep 11, 2013 12:54 |  #71

dave_bass5 wrote in post #16287662 (external link)
I personally think its a bit over hyped. If definitely has its uses but i cant see the benefit of using it all the time for everything.
Saying that, i have mine set to AF-Off and find that is more useful for me.

Is it needed all the time? Most likely not however, once used it became second nature and I found no reason to switch back and forth. It is a personal preference .




  
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Sep 11, 2013 14:53 |  #72

Definitely personal preference, but I preferred it immediately when I first tried it and never looked back. I don't think the concept is that confusing. My 7 year old has been using it on my cameras since he was a 6 year old. He's a natural though. ;o)


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Sep 11, 2013 14:55 |  #73

Q-Man wrote in post #16288764 (external link)
Definitely personal preference, but I preferred it immediately when I first tried it and never looked back. I don't think the concept is that confusing. My 7 year old has been using it on my cameras since he was a 6 year old. He's a natural though. ;o)

I agree, I just know my thumb is the focusing finger and my index finger takes the shot. Then the thumb, usually connected to the brain, knows when to stay focusing (press down) or stop focusing (let go), the hand points the camera for focusing and then the shot, and index finger fires.

I no longer have to switch between one shot and AI servo by doing this.

:)


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Sep 11, 2013 15:01 |  #74

BBF for me.

I use the af button to focus, and a half-press of the shutter to lock in exposure (if I'm shooting in AV).

I did the same with my EOS M when I got it lol. * is for focusing, and a half shutter press for exposure.


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dnauer
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Sep 11, 2013 15:09 |  #75

apersson850 wrote in post #16287682 (external link)
It seems we are all different...
Me holding my camera.

Thumb tip is right over the AF-ON button.

I agree with Dave in that I find it mainly useful when using Servo AF for action shooting.

I just acquired a 70D and this is now true for me -- your picture is exactly how my thumb lies on the 70D. On my 40D the AF-ON button was more difficult to reach and not comfortable. The smaller 70D fits my thumb better for the AF-ON button (although now my pinky is under the camera . . .). So I've gone back to BBF in AI Servo and trying it out. Because the 40D wasn't comfortable I never became a BBF fan using it -- we'll see how it goes with the 70D.




  
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back button auto focus...
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