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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 23 Sep 2013 (Monday) 00:11
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shooting soccer-need some tips

 
hikermk
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Sep 23, 2013 00:11 |  #1

I have been shooting photos of my son's hockey team for the past 8 years. The shots were always ok, but not great. Last year I learned a lot on these forums and purchased a used Sigma F2.8 lens & learned to make all the adjustments in manual. So last season were some of my best hockey shots. This year my son decided to try out for the high school soccer team. Never played in his life and made the team. So needless to say I am new to this sport but just like hockey, you learn to follow and anticipate the action. What I need are some tips for shooting during the day and for at night under the lights. Any advice on ISO, shutter speed and aperture combinations for sunny, cloudy and night games would be appreciated. I will be using my T4i with a non-is Sigma F2.8 70-200.


Canon 80D, Canon T4i, Sigma 70-200 F2.8, Canon 85 F1.8, Canon EFS 18-135 STM, Canon EFS 18-135, EFS 10-22, Speedlight 420 EX, Speedlight 430 EX II, Stroboframe, Manfrotto tripod

  
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DC ­ Fan
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Sep 23, 2013 07:38 |  #2

hikermk wrote in post #16317603 (external link)
I have been shooting photos of my son's hockey team for the past 8 years. The shots were always ok, but not great. Last year I learned a lot on these forums and purchased a used Sigma F2.8 lens & learned to make all the adjustments in manual. So last season were some of my best hockey shots. This year my son decided to try out for the high school soccer team. Never played in his life and made the team. So needless to say I am new to this sport but just like hockey, you learn to follow and anticipate the action. What I need are some tips for shooting during the day and for at night under the lights. Any advice on ISO, shutter speed and aperture combinations for sunny, cloudy and night games would be appreciated. I will be using my T4i with a non-is Sigma F2.8 70-200.

Association football images from a non-stabilized Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 lens.

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 60D
Lens: 70-200mm
Image Date: 2012-10-03 20:15:52 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 178.0mm
Aperture: f/3.2
Exposure Time: 0.0016 s (1/640)
ISO equiv: 6400
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 60D
Lens: 70-200mm
Image Date: 2011-09-06 20:20:36 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 70.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0025 s (1/400)
ISO equiv: 1250
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: Manual
Exposure Mode: Manual
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB
GPS Coordinate: undefined, undefined

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 60D
Lens: 70-200mm
Focal Length: 110.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0013 s (1/800)
ISO equiv: 2500
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: Manual
Exposure Mode: Manual
White Balance: Manual
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS REBEL T2i
Lens: 70-200mm
Focal Length: 144.0mm
Aperture: f/4.0
Exposure Time: 0.0025 s (1/400)
ISO equiv: 5000
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: Manual
Exposure Mode: Manual
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB

There are no secrets or mysteries for any night or artificially illuminated event. High ISO. large aperture.

Everything else depends on quickly tracking and closely framing the action, then pushing the shutter button at the correct time.



  
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hikermk
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Sep 23, 2013 08:16 |  #3

Thanks for all the information DC Fan. From looking at your settings I know I definitely have room to lower my shutter speed slightly for night games. From there I can make the other accommodating adjustments. Is 1/400 the lowest you will go for night games?


Canon 80D, Canon T4i, Sigma 70-200 F2.8, Canon 85 F1.8, Canon EFS 18-135 STM, Canon EFS 18-135, EFS 10-22, Speedlight 420 EX, Speedlight 430 EX II, Stroboframe, Manfrotto tripod

  
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llie19
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Sep 23, 2013 14:57 |  #4

i would say 1/800 is probably the lowest shutter speed that works. for night games, you can go even slower but the keeper rate would also go down.


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Strouty
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Sep 23, 2013 16:08 |  #5

I would echo the comment about the tight framing. I'd say it's even more important than finding the 'optimum' shutter speed/ISO balance. The biggest issue I see with people who are struggling with poor ISO performance (especially on todays sensors which are great) is that they shoot way too loose. I shoot with a 5d3, but even a tightly framed shot at ISO 12800 looks a hell of a lot better than an ISO 1600 loosely framed shot that I'm trying to aggresively crop. High ISO are all about signal to noise ratios, so the bigger your signal (larger the subject in the viewfinder), the less you are going to notice the noise.

As far as settings go, every situation is different, and there is no hard and fast rule for the perfect shutter speed/ISO (I'd say pretty much always leave your aperture @ 2.8, day or night, unless a specific shot calls for a wider DOF or if you are really struggling with focus). Faster sports require faster shutter speeds. I generally err on the side of bump up the ISO to get a higher shutter speed. My rule of thumb (YMMV) is generally up to ISO 3200 to get me to at least 1/1000, ISO 6400 to get me to at least 1/800, and ISO 12800 to get me to 1/500. Beyond that, and I'll usually supplement lighting with a flash.


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Sibil
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Sep 25, 2013 10:16 |  #6

Strouty wrote in post #16319277 (external link)
I would echo the comment about the tight framing. I'd say it's even more important than finding the 'optimum' shutter speed/ISO balance. The biggest issue I see with people who are struggling with poor ISO performance (especially on todays sensors which are great) is that they shoot way too loose. I shoot with a 5d3, but even a tightly framed shot at ISO 12800 looks a hell of a lot better than an ISO 1600 loosely framed shot that I'm trying to aggresively crop. High ISO are all about signal to noise ratios, so the bigger your signal (larger the subject in the viewfinder), the less you are going to notice the noise.

Very very true. So the camera-to-subject distance and the lens focal length become important.




  
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dwarrenr
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Sep 25, 2013 13:15 |  #7

DC Fan wrote in post #16318047 (external link)
Association football images from a non-stabilized Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 lens.

Everything else depends on quickly tracking and closely framing the action, then pushing the shutter button at the correct time.

Kevin, glad to see your new job has not stopped you from visiting this board. :D

As far as shutter speed goes...if the action is coming straight at you, you can get away with 1/500...but if the action is going by you from left to right (or right to left) 1/800 will still give you some blur...I don't mind if the ball and feet have some blur...but the rest of the body I want sharp.


D. Warren Robison
"All guys feel the need to compensate. Most compensate with sports cars. I compensate with a 400mm 2.8"
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mrrikki
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Sep 25, 2013 14:59 |  #8

I try to keep over 1000 ss sometimes down to 800, I am lucky most of my night games are under really good flood lights. Haven't done one since last May though, my profile picture was me pitch side at a pro rugby game taken by another press photographer.

Some good advice and examples from DC.


GEAR: Canon 7D Mark II, 7D & 6D Lenses: Canon 300 f2.8 L IS, 70-200 f2.8 L, 24-105 L, Canon 50mm f1.8 & Sigma 1.4x Converter.
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Hannya
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Sep 26, 2013 12:24 |  #9

Unsure what your lights might be like. I shoot non-league in the UK and daylight matches are fine. You don't need IS for shooting soccer anyway. Under lights, I have to push the iso as high as it will go - 6400 on my body, and set the lens to f/2.8 and hope I get a reasonable shutter speed, often 1/400 which really isn't great. If you have to go that low, get a position where you can shoot the players coming towards you, that minimises blur.

For daytime, and floodlight, use AIServo or whatever the Nikon variety is, centre spot focus.

My picture galleries http://photodiva.zenfo​lio.com/ (external link)


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Hannya
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Sep 26, 2013 12:26 |  #10

Strouty wrote in post #16319277 (external link)
I would echo the comment about the tight framing. I'd say it's even more important than finding the 'optimum' shutter speed/ISO balance. The biggest issue I see with people who are struggling with poor ISO performance (especially on todays sensors which are great) is that they shoot way too loose. I shoot with a 5d3, but even a tightly framed shot at ISO 12800 looks a hell of a lot better than an ISO 1600 loosely framed shot that I'm trying to aggresively crop. High ISO are all about signal to noise ratios, so the bigger your signal (larger the subject in the viewfinder), the less you are going to notice the noise.

As far as settings go, every situation is different, and there is no hard and fast rule for the perfect shutter speed/ISO (I'd say pretty much always leave your aperture @ 2.8, day or night, unless a specific shot calls for a wider DOF or if you are really struggling with focus). Faster sports require faster shutter speeds. I generally err on the side of bump up the ISO to get a higher shutter speed. My rule of thumb (YMMV) is generally up to ISO 3200 to get me to at least 1/1000, ISO 6400 to get me to at least 1/800, and ISO 12800 to get me to 1/500. Beyond that, and I'll usually supplement lighting with a flash.

+1 on all but use of flash. Shooters never use flash in the UK.


“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” ― Henri Cartier-Bresson

Sports Pics (external link)

  
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asysin2leads
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Oct 20, 2013 19:43 as a reply to  @ Hannya's post |  #11

There's a lot of things that can affect shooting high school soccer.

1. Getting later in the year, you'll have fields that are half bright and half dark. Make sure to set your settings to accommodate both. This can be tough.

2. Most high school field lights suck. No other way to put that. While I have not seen a specific rule on this, when I asked refs this year, it was about 50/50 that did not want flashes going off during games. I understand this. That will require you to have a camera with high ISO capability or one that can adequately shoot 1/800th and a good noise reduction program. What I have found is that shooting from the sidelines during night games under the lights will provide you more light than shooting from behind the goal line.

Here is one that is unedited other than a bit of cropping.

Av: f/3.2
Tv: 1/800
ISO: 3200

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
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Here's the same image with a bit of editing. Something that could all be done via batch process.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
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3. Getting access to sideline. Some schools will only allow a certain number of people on the sidelines for pictures. That will relegate you to the stands to try to get shots. My advice would be to offer your services to the coach. That way you can be the "official" team photographer. This will come into play mostly at away games. Other schools don't want just any Tom, Dick or Mary wandering the sidelines with camera in tow.

4. Most importantly.....stay out of the way. If you think you'll going to be in the way, ask. I've never had a ref ask me to move, even from behind the goal line. Just stay out from behind the goal.

Here's another that was only cropped. I think your gear is more the capable to get some great shots.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/png'

Kevin
https://www.google.com ….com&ctz=Americ​a/New_York (external link)

  
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bobbyz
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Oct 20, 2013 22:38 |  #12

1. Sit on the butt when shooting. If not at least kneel. The biggest difference in your shots.


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Hannya
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Oct 21, 2013 09:44 |  #13

bobbyz wrote in post #16386308 (external link)
1. Sit on the butt when shooting. If not at least kneel. The biggest difference in your shots.

Or, if your knees creak, get a little stool, e.g. camping or fishing. :)


“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” ― Henri Cartier-Bresson

Sports Pics (external link)

  
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Sibil
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Oct 21, 2013 12:18 |  #14

Hannya wrote in post #16387230 (external link)
Or, if your knees creak, get a little stool, e.g. camping or fishing. :)

I use Walkstool when my back can't tolerate shooting from sitting down position. I find it too high too shoot soccer. So I usually take Advil before heading out.:)




  
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johnb007
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Nov 11, 2013 09:19 |  #15

I found shooting soccer with a 200mm lens is like fishing...there is a lot of waiting.


-John
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shooting soccer-need some tips
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