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Thread started 07 Oct 2013 (Monday) 13:01
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HDR of moving subject

 
Tony-S
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Oct 07, 2013 21:31 |  #16

Scatterbrained wrote in post #16354107 (external link)
Did you read the OP or the rest of the thread? The discussion is about tonemapping single images and calling them HDR, which they aren't. My point it that someone who actually knows what they are doing can get similar results in Lr without having to take that one image and run it through HDR software.

The OP asks about HDR using multiple images and the inherent problems with moving objects between frames.

burninghotcheese wrote in post #16353035 (external link)
So as I understand it, and HDR is an image made of several images of the same thing at different exposures stitched together. I've seen HDRs of things that are moving, like bicycles, but doesn't everything in the frame have to be stationary, otherwise you would end up with a blurred image since the bike is moving and in different places in each of the frames?

You can take a single frame and pull shadows and highlights all you want, but that will not cover the range of light for most sunlit scenes. Other than the Sony a99, Nikon D800 and D600, and the Pentax K-5 II and K-3 (and some medium format), no digital camera has the ability to capture in the 12 stop range that frequently occurs in high dynamic range scenes. Editing a single frame is just that. There's nothing all that complicated about it so long as you have the software and skills for manipulating the file. Heck, most good cameras today handle that just fine with their built-in JPEG algorithms. But you're still confined by the limitation of the dynamic range of the camera's sensor system. With a 5Diii, for example, you can expect to get only about 10 stops of DR, which is incapable of capturing a mountain vista in sunlight.

The photo above doesn't appear to be a high dynamic range scene. And the processing makes it look more like a Norman Rockwell painting, if you ask me. I'm not saying it doesn't have aesthetic value (I actually like it), but it really isn't a representation of a high dynamic range scene.


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
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328iGuy
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Oct 08, 2013 07:02 |  #17

Tony-S wrote in post #16354283 (external link)
The photo above doesn't appear to be a high dynamic range scene. And the processing makes it look more like a Norman Rockwell painting, if you ask me. I'm not saying it doesn't have aesthetic value (I actually like it), but it really isn't a representation of a high dynamic range scene.

Thank you. I was just showing what a single tone mapped image would look like as an example.


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nittaya
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Oct 08, 2013 07:30 as a reply to  @ 328iGuy's post |  #18

for the scene where highlights are sky and shadows is land. and moving object is on land then with exposer bracketed shots that you take use digital blending it will be easier to handle the moving object . This is possible in digital blending as in digital blending underexposed shot is used to get the highlight part of the shot only and the overexposed shot is used to get the shadow part of the shot only.




  
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tonylong
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Oct 08, 2013 09:25 |  #19

If you do bracket shots with a moving subject, then I'd say you'd want to get a bit creative at some point with cloning out the subject from individual shots. I'd think you would have the most success by having more than the "typical" three shot exposures, if your camera supports more than three shots (I think the Magic Lantern "hack" allows you to do that but I may be mistaken). The idea would be to get a well-exposed shot of the subject that you could also use to clone the "missing" background into the combined layers that the subject has been removed from, something along those lines!?

I haven't done that with HDR, so I'm kind of guessing here. I did have some fun one with a guy who was kiteboarding and I combined two shots with two "views" of him in motion, but they weren't "bracketed" exposures (in fact the final pic should be brought down exposure-wise, but it was just a quick favor for him):

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 403 | MIME changed to 'text/html'

Tony
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carshop
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Oct 08, 2013 09:36 |  #20

Rimmer wrote in post #16353762 (external link)
Good point! Check out these free presets for Lightroom, for example:

http://lightroomkiller​tips.com/?p=3972 (external link)


I use these a lot.
They are great.


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HDR of moving subject
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