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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 04 Mar 2011 (Friday) 07:18
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My 60D is off to Canon! Grip rubbers detaching

 
John ­ from ­ PA
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Oct 11, 2013 12:09 |  #61

Frodge wrote in post #16363109 (external link)
Any idea of serial number vs build date? How can I tell he build date? And this was rectified in later models? Thanks for the input....

At least with respect to the 60D I don't believe there was an "official" recall, just a policy that Canon would take care of things if the camera was returned for the issue. Some people had an outright replacement of all the rubber at no charge and well past warranty. A few seem to have paid a reduced amount for the repair. Perhaps the overall condition of the camera enters into how Canon treats the owner.

With respect to the T4i however there was an "official" recall due to a white residue on the rubber grips that some people found to be an irritant. A very specific line of serial numbers was mentioned as I recall.

By the way with respect to the repair of peeling rubber parts...many people recommend double backed tape which is the original product. I have repaired rubber components (not my 60D which is holding up well) with one of the Loctite or 3M products available in auto stores for attaching rubber seals to metal car surfaces. You need a product that when cured retains some flexibility. Gorilla glue hardens rigid, expands when curing and in time will crack. The 3M product is called 3M Super Weatherstrip and Gasket Adhesive, about $4 at an auto store. It is black. Just use care when applying (avoid excess) and hold in place with duct tape or electrical tape until cured. This is the 3M product description.

A strong, flexible, rubbery adhesive that can withstand vibration, oil, grease, and extreme temperature variations. It can be used to bond weatherstripping to car doors, trunks, T-tops, moon roofs and sun roofs. Excellent adhesive for holding paper, cork, or rubber gaskets in place during installation.

My one reservation is in this thread someone mentioned holes under the rubber grip that would possibly seem to allow a passage of adhesive into the internals of the camera. I would still prefer the adhesive but would likely place some thin double backed tape in the immediate area of any hole to both cover the hole and provide an adhesive property.




  
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Frodge
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Oct 11, 2013 12:12 |  #62

So this is a problem that extends really across all models. Sad really. I have a Yashica fx-2 super 2000 that is about 25-28 years old tha still looks new. Is it best to just have some grips stored away for each of the canons for when this happens? It is a strange phenomenon. The rubber on my bicycle levers have a tremendous amount of stress out on them and they're not even glued. Imperceptible among of stretch on that rubber. This is disappointing.


_______________
“It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” - Walt Disney.
Equipment: Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 40mm 2.8, Tamron 17-50 2.8 XR Di, Canon 18-55mm, Canon 50mm 1.8, Tamron 70-300VC / T3I and 60D

  
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John ­ from ­ PA
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Oct 11, 2013 12:27 |  #63

This is disappointing.

You are getting overly concerned about something that may not happen in the lifetime of the camera. Cross the bridge when you get there, otherwise move on and take pictures. That 60D will only be pristine if you leave it in a drawer.




  
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Colin ­ Glover
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Oct 11, 2013 12:57 |  #64

Seems the more you use it the worse it gets. My fuji HS20 is similar in size to my 600d. Its grip is protruding about 5mm out of where it should be. Compared to my Eos gets less than 10% of the use and is a18 mths old. Will affect all large cameras.


Canon EOS 70D, Canon EOS 600D, EF-S 18-55 ii, EF 55-200 USM ii, EF-S 75-300 iii, Tamron 28-80, Sigma 70-210. Pentax 50mm, Pentax 135mm, EF-S 55-250, Raynox Macro adapter, Neewer filters (CPL, UV, FLD & ND4), Fuji HS20 EXR (30X zoom ) & cable release, Yongnuo 560 iii & Luxon 9800A manual flashguns for the Fuji, Hama Star 63 tripod, Hongdek RC-6 remote control, Velbon DF 40 www.point-n-shoot.co.uk website.

  
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Frodge
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Oct 11, 2013 13:08 |  #65

Colin Glover wrote in post #16363333 (external link)
Seems the more you use it the worse it gets. My fuji HS20 is similar in size to my 600d. Its grip is protruding about 5mm out of where it should be. Compared to my Eos gets less than 10% of the use and is a18 mths old. Will affect all large cameras.

I disagree that it will affect all large cameras. It's poor parts.


_______________
“It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” - Walt Disney.
Equipment: Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 40mm 2.8, Tamron 17-50 2.8 XR Di, Canon 18-55mm, Canon 50mm 1.8, Tamron 70-300VC / T3I and 60D

  
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Phoenixkh
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Oct 11, 2013 13:25 |  #66

Over the years, I've found it's important for me to relax how I hold things.... not to grip them too tightly. I learned this while learning the carpentry trade, esp. when holding a hammer, both framing and finish. I learned the trade before nail guns were readily available. We did everything by hand, including cutting and nailing molding. Tough to believe, I know. ;)

Anyway, I find this approach also works when I'm holding my camera. I sort of cradle the lens in my left hand and gently hold onto the body with my right. That relaxed stance seems to calm me down and ends up giving less camera shake.

That being said, I'm now 60 so I'm using a monopod for all of my walk-abouts. This only varies when I know I'm going out to shoot a particular landscape. In those cases,I get to the spot and set up my tripod. I take both with me whenever I'm out and about.


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RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition | Editing Encouraged

  
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Hogloff
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Oct 11, 2013 14:43 |  #67
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Phoenixkh wrote in post #16363377 (external link)
Over the years, I've found it's important for me to relax how I hold things.... not to grip them too tightly. I learned this while learning the carpentry trade, esp. when holding a hammer, both framing and finish. I learned the trade before nail guns were readily available. We did everything by hand, including cutting and nailing molding. Tough to believe, I know. ;)

Anyway, I find this approach also works when I'm holding my camera. I sort of cradle the lens in my left hand and gently hold onto the body with my right. That relaxed stance seems to calm me down and ends up giving less camera shake.

That being said, I'm now 60 so I'm using a monopod for all of my walk-abouts. This only varies when I know I'm going out to shoot a particular landscape. In those cases,I get to the spot and set up my tripod. I take both with me whenever I'm out and about.

Were not talking about holding an egg here, we are talking about camera equipment meant to be used. If something starts peeling because you are not cradling the body just right, then that is a problem with the equipment.




  
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Frodge
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Oct 11, 2013 14:51 |  #68

Hogloff wrote in post #16363560 (external link)
Were not talking about holding an egg here, we are talking about camera equipment meant to be used. If something starts peeling because you are not cradling the body just right, then that is a problem with the equipment.

Haw you had peeling? It's obscene that after this happened once, canon has not fixed the problem for good.


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“It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” - Walt Disney.
Equipment: Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 40mm 2.8, Tamron 17-50 2.8 XR Di, Canon 18-55mm, Canon 50mm 1.8, Tamron 70-300VC / T3I and 60D

  
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Frodge
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Oct 11, 2013 21:01 |  #69

http://www.dpreview.co​m/forums/thread/294198​0 (external link)


_______________
“It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” - Walt Disney.
Equipment: Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 40mm 2.8, Tamron 17-50 2.8 XR Di, Canon 18-55mm, Canon 50mm 1.8, Tamron 70-300VC / T3I and 60D

  
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bdp23
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Oct 12, 2013 08:29 |  #70

My new grip patch hasn't caused me any problems since repair.
I don't know if I've been lucky, or subconsciously cautious since having it replaced, but I'd say they fixed the problem properly and for the long term.

The body has ~40k shots on it now and has all the usual shiny spots. The grip has some barely noticeable 'play' in it, but it seems like it's just the top layer of the material, with perceivable firmness/rigidity just below it, so I'd put it down to the textured top bit being a little more flexible than the fully adhered layer.

All fine since repair.
My girlfriend's 60D was purchased a few months after my repair and has since been taken on a 4month south america and antarctica trip. She in fact took my body to Africa and put most of the wear-and-tear on the body that caused the grip to lift to begin with.
Her (slightly) newer copy of the same camera has showed no signs of this issue, so I'm pretty confident they got it right in factory after the first warranty claims were made, and by the time mine was done it was a known problem that had filtered from official channels to the service centres.

I'm sure you'll be fine with a new body now.


I like making photos and sometimes I think I'm getting better... then I realise it doesn't matter. I like making photos!

  
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My 60D is off to Canon! Grip rubbers detaching
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