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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 30 Oct 2013 (Wednesday) 11:21
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exposure compensation general question

 
glassila
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Oct 30, 2013 11:21 |  #1

Let's say I am shooting an activity in a low light gym/room with no flash allowed. I am in Tv (shutterspeed) priority mode, I set my shutter speed to 640 (I don't want to go any slower), I've set my ISO is as high as possible, the aperture is 2.8 which is the lens maximum.
The questions is...can exposure compensation do anything to lighten up a photo in this situation?

My understanding is that exposure compensation changes the camera's aperture or shutter speed or ISO depending which mode you are in...if settings are already maxed out is exposure compensation a possibility?




  
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gonzogolf
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Oct 30, 2013 11:26 |  #2

First of all, shooting in a gym like that you really ought to be in manual. The lighting is mostly consistent and there is no need to meter each shot so your better bet is to put the camera in 1/640, wide open, and adjust the ISO to get what you need. This way you are not fooled by a white or dark jersey taking up an inordinate amount of the scene in your viewfinder and throwing off your exposure.




  
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armis
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Oct 30, 2013 11:45 |  #3

glassila wrote in post #16410927 (external link)
The questions is...can exposure compensation do anything to lighten up a photo in this situation?

If you've manually set ISO, speed and aperture, exposure comp has no effect at all.


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gonzogolf
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Oct 30, 2013 11:47 |  #4

armis wrote in post #16410979 (external link)
If you've manually set ISO, speed and aperture, exposure comp has no effect at all.

The OP said TV mode




  
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PacAce
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Oct 30, 2013 12:04 |  #5

glassila wrote in post #16410927 (external link)
Let's say I am shooting an activity in a low light gym/room with no flash allowed. I am in Tv (shutterspeed) priority mode, I set my shutter speed to 640 (I don't want to go any slower), I've set my ISO is as high as possible, the aperture is 2.8 which is the lens maximum.
The questions is...can exposure compensation do anything to lighten up a photo in this situation?

My understanding is that exposure compensation changes the camera's aperture or shutter speed or ISO depending which mode you are in...if settings are already maxed out is exposure compensation a possibility?

No, other than in the opposite direction.


...Leo

  
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glassila
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Oct 30, 2013 12:14 as a reply to  @ PacAce's post |  #6

Thanks for all the replies. I got the answer I thought I would. I had looked for awhile for a definitive answer. All the information I found about exposure compensation dealt with situations where the settings were not maxed out and therefore a measure of EC was available.
Thanks you!!!




  
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Wilt
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Oct 30, 2013 12:59 |  #7

Understand first that Exposure Compensation (the concept) simply changes how the METER interprets the light it sees in the scene...the meter then biases what it thinks is 'proper exposure'. Point a meter at bride in white gown in a snow field, and it (without EC) will suggest an exposure that renders the gown and snow dingy grey! Use +1.5EV EC and then the meter suggests an exposure that renders the gown and snow more white in appearance.

IMAGE: http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i63/wiltonw/Principles/ECconcept_zps9375225d.jpg

Above, the three zones of the PhotoVision target...the left shot is exposed per spot meter reading of the central 18% area, the right shot is exposed per spot meter reading of the lower white area...the difference in exposure is 1.66EV more exposure on the left than on the right. The left shot was exposed at 1/25 f/4 ISO400, while the right shot was exposed at 1/80 f/4 ISO400.

If I had aimed my meter at the white area at the bottom while in Tv or Av mode, I would need to dial in EC = +1.66EV to tell the meter that "my metered target is actually brighter than 18% gray by +1.66EV". That way the meter would have asked the camera for 1/25 f/4 ISO400, rather than asking for 1/80 f/4 ISO400 while it was pointed to the white area. It changed the meter's interpretation about what it was seeing...it really was targeting white, and not targeting something mid-tone grey.

So EC does NOT make a camera more sensitive to the available light, it merely tells the meter to ask the camera to use a slower shutter speed or larger aperture to render the scene correctly.

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glassila
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Oct 30, 2013 14:22 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #8

That is a great explanation Wilt. I misunderstood what EC did...I thought it changed the cameras sensitivity.




  
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Snafoo
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Oct 30, 2013 15:20 |  #9

I think a more appropriate name for it would be "Exposure Offset".


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Wilt
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Oct 30, 2013 15:25 |  #10

Snafoo wrote in post #16411495 (external link)
I think a more appropriate name for it would be "Exposure Offset".

OTOH, by thinking 'I can help to compensate for the error caused by the meter seeing a target which is brighter/darker than middle tone', its current name works.


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OhLook
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Oct 30, 2013 16:02 |  #11

glassila wrote in post #16411370 (external link)
That is a great explanation Wilt. I misunderstood what EC did...I thought it changed the cameras sensitivity.

I thought as you did until I read this thread. Then I took a pair of test shots and checked the settings that the camera had chosen. This is a G15, not a DSLR, but its EC works the same way.

I'd rather have EC change the way the sensor behaves than do what it does.


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gonzogolf
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Oct 30, 2013 16:18 |  #12

OhLook wrote in post #16411608 (external link)
I thought as you did until I read this thread. Then I took a pair of test shots and checked the settings that the camera had chosen. This is a G15, not a DSLR, but its EC works the same way.

I'd rather have EC change the way the sensor behaves than do what it does.

What do you mean by changing the way the sensor behaves? If the light is limited, then it can only borrow from one of three sources, shutter speed, aperture, or ISO. The sensor cant create any more light and if you fix one of the variables (using AV of TV modes)it has to come from one of the others.




  
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Wilt
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Oct 30, 2013 16:25 |  #13

OhLook wrote in post #16411608 (external link)
I thought as you did until I read this thread. Then I took a pair of test shots and checked the settings that the camera had chosen. This is a G15, not a DSLR, but its EC works the same way.

I'd rather have EC change the way the sensor behaves than do what it does.

For the entire history of metered cameras, the purpose of Exposure Compensation has been to 'compensate the meter' in one direction or other, because the target seen by the meter is brighter/darker than assumed (18% midtone). Changing a dSLR to make EC different would make the dSLR not work just like film SLRs, and would impair the transition between the two camera types.


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flashpoint99
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Oct 30, 2013 16:36 |  #14

gonzogolf wrote in post #16411645 (external link)
What do you mean by changing the way the sensor behaves? If the light is limited, then it can only borrow from one of three sources, shutter speed, aperture, or ISO. The sensor cant create any more light and if you fix one of the variables (using AV of TV modes)it has to come from one of the others.

It changes the way it meters the light. In a theater with a black cutain in the background your camera will try to compensate for that dark curtain and get to neutral grey. When it does this is will end up blow out the faces of dancers or performers and they will appear bright white and void of detail. Knowing this situation alows you to set up your camera and compensate for the dark curtain or outfit ect ect by altering what the camera thinks it is seeing.




  
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gonzogolf
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Oct 30, 2013 16:40 |  #15

flashpoint99 wrote in post #16411684 (external link)
It changes the way it meters the light. In a theater with a black cutain in the background your camera will try to compensate for that dark curtain and get to neutral grey. When it does this is will end up blow out the faces of dancers or performers and they will appear bright white and void of detail. Knowing this situation alows you to set up your camera and compensate for the dark curtain or outfit ect ect by altering what the camera thinks it is seeing.

No, it doesn't change the way it meters. It adjusts the settings to accommodate the flaw in the metering.




  
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exposure compensation general question
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