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Thread started 02 Sep 2013 (Monday) 21:34
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Purchased 6D, encountering metering issues?

 
Comerfjc
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Sep 04, 2013 16:57 as a reply to  @ post 16265687 |  #16

Hot dang, these are all excellent replies. Thanks everyone, nice to see I'm not the only one experiencing things this way.

I'm about 5 weddings deep in terms of editing right now, so it'll be a bit before I really get a chance to sit down and LOOK at those photos. Observations since then would suggest that, part of what I was experiencing was just the massive, MASSIVE difference between the old 5D screen and the 6D screen. I'll attempt to post some samples of my own photos ASAP. I deleted most of the problem ones in camera while I was shooting, but a few should be left.

Any time you change cameras it's going to take a while to learn its nuances, such as how it meters and what it does with the metered values when using any of the auto exposure modes.

After sitting and reflecting for a bit, I realized this. I've used those 5D bodies for so long and expected the 6D to function similarly, despite the fact that I purchased it for the very reason that I wanted an *upgrade*, not the same camera.

I figure it'll take a few months, but the 6D will feel more at home in my hands as I shoot through the end of my wedding season and into family photos around the holidays.

amfoto1, your comments were a very helpful read. Thanks for taking the time to write that. Although I'm not sure who first brought up the issue of WB. For the most part, that was spot on. Maybe even a bit cooler than normal.

Also, this is embarrassing to admit, but I have never used A-EL before. I've been experimenting with it now that it's been mentioned, and I'll see how it affects my shooting experience with the 6D.

Thanks for the feedback everyone. Photos to come.


Jason
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CallMeJag
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Sep 04, 2013 18:48 |  #17

You're not alone. I've certainly noticed this as well - coming from a 5DII to the 6D. I feel like I'm ALWAYS increasing exposure in post, no matter what the situation. I never experienced this with the 5D or even my X100. I'm using evaluative metering and center point AF (Av mode) almost exclusively.


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Comerfjc
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Sep 05, 2013 13:38 as a reply to  @ CallMeJag's post |  #18

Ok, here's two examples from some weddings this last weekend.

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I eventually started experimenting with different metering modes, but they seemed to make almost NO practical difference. (At least compared to using them on my 5D bodies)

What really drove me nuts was that using spot metering seemed the least effective. I could place it on a black section of plants, or on a dark outfit, nothing. It's like it completely ignored the metering method I had it using.

I'm currently experimenting with center-weighted average, we'll see how that works over the next week or so. :confused:

Jason
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Charlie
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Sep 05, 2013 13:46 |  #19

Comerfjc wrote in post #16270778 (external link)
Ok, here's two examples from some weddings this last weekend.


I eventually started experimenting with different metering modes, but they seemed to make almost NO practical difference. (At least compared to using them on my 5D bodies)

What really drove me nuts was that using spot metering seemed the least effective. I could place it on a black section of plants, or on a dark outfit, nothing. It's like it completely ignored the metering method I had it using.

I'm currently experimenting with center-weighted average, we'll see how that works over the next week or so. :confused:

I would say that spot metering works very well for me, since I focus and recompose.

you can try exposure lock or manual. Put the camera in live view, get the histogram where you want it, and use those settings in manual.

IMO, the past 5D and 5D2 were much more predictable when metering. I do pay more attention to metering nowadays, seems like I'm off more often. Shot karate in a gym the other night and I was just so off using evaluative. It was gym lighting, but not too low (ISO 1600, 1/400s, F2.8). Most shots half stop unexposed....


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Charlie
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Sep 05, 2013 13:54 |  #20

btw Comerfjc, I see you used spot in the second photo, but the center could have been the background. spot metering only meters using that little circle in the center, not where the AF point may be.


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Comerfjc
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Sep 05, 2013 15:34 |  #21

Charlie wrote in post #16270824 (external link)
btw Comerfjc, I see you used spot in the second photo, but the center could have been the background. spot metering only meters using that little circle in the center, not where the AF point may be.

That's true! And I was considering that as I looked through the photos. However, it was one of multiple metering settings I used. The problem remains constant throughout. :confused:

We took a walk through a small path that was almost totally covered by foliage, specifically so I could test out different modes. They all came out very similar, very underexposed.


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Mark0159
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Sep 05, 2013 16:41 |  #22

there are 4 metering modes that come with the canon 6D.
Evaluated metering mode which will cover most of the viewfinder and will try and reach an over all balance.
Partial Metering when the background is much brighter
Spot Metering for a subject only and covers 3.5% of the viewfinder. this is the centre circle that you see in the viewfinder.
and centre-weighted average metering.

None of these are listed are called Pattern metering and after a quick google search it may be Evaluated metering. However with out the a photo posted with the exif data that I can check myself then it's hard to know. With the photo I can then load it in to canon software and get correct information from the file. 3rd party software isn't always correct.

but in saying that the metering in a camera isn't always going to give you the best results. If the camera isn't at fault here and it's trying to do the best you can do then perhaps you should look at using the camera in manual model. Take a photo and just the settings to what you want. You should know the camera like the back of your hand. You know what the 5D will give you and if the new camera isn't working on the day then you should rely on what you know to get the work done. Your clients aren't there to experiment with. Learn the camera before you before you use it for a client.

Anyway looking at those photos the first one was shot at iso1600 F2 1/2000 at 35mm, looking at that you had plenty of room to adjust any one of these photos to get the correct exposure. Remember that you can shoot @ 35mm handheld around 1/30~1/40 of sec. that's a far cry from what you where using. If you looked at the histogram at the back the camera you would have noticed that it's to your right by a lot.
the 2nd photo was shot at iso800 F1.8 1/4000 at 35mm and again it's the same deal. You have got plenty of room to adjust your settings.

If however it's a camera at fault then you need to test it out with your current gear. create a scene that's even in brightness and take some test shots with the old camera and then the new camera and see how they come out. Make sure that the metering mode is the same and your using the same settings for both (shutter, aperture and ISO)
they should be around the same result give or take about ~1 stop either way.

Remember that your metering in your camera is trying to get the scene to 15% gray and it's not going to get it right all the time. But as a working photographer the gear is your end of the business, knowing things like aperture, shutter and ISO and how they effect your exposure is your job. hence why you are the one with the camera.


Mark
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Comerfjc
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Sep 05, 2013 20:59 |  #23

Mark0159 wrote in post #16271194 (external link)
Anyway looking at those photos the first one was shot at iso1600 F2 1/2000 at 35mm, looking at that you had plenty of room to adjust any one of these photos to get the correct exposure. Remember that you can shoot @ 35mm handheld around 1/30~1/40 of sec. that's a far cry from what you where using. If you looked at the histogram at the back the camera you would have noticed that it's to your right by a lot.
the 2nd photo was shot at iso800 F1.8 1/4000 at 35mm and again it's the same deal. You have got plenty of room to adjust your settings.

And indeed, after seeing the problem at hand, I DID move to manual. Or instructed the camera to overexpose while in AV. Solutions were found quickly and easily, nothing was ruined and the client will likely be thrilled with the good photos we got.

The issue was not that I was unable to get the correct exposure-- that was easy to do. The issue is that my 6D seems to, in my experience so far, do a poor job of consistently finding the proper exposure under certain conditions that my old 5D bodies had no problem with.

You're absolutely right that using a new body requires adjustments in style and use, understanding its quirks. But I posted this because the issue I experienced seem well out of 'quirk' and into 'problem'. I posted earlier that I was using a 5D and 6D side by side, and the issue was very pronounced. Like, 2-3 stops pronounced.

My hope for this thread is not primarily a workaround for shooting with the 6D. I can shoot with the 6D just fine. (And like most folks have recommended, I shot most of the day with the 6D on M.) My hope was more to discover if anyone else had a similar experience that might indicate an issue with the camera. Perhaps the kind of thing that one might write to Canon about. Firmware updates come from customers complaining of problems with the camera, and I was curious to see if I was the only person with this experience.

I will, however, take your advice to set up some scenes to see if I can't better isolate or understand the difference in how my 5Ds and 6D tackle the issue. I've been doing that since the weddings, but it might be nice to go back to some of the locations and try to recreate the shots with both bodies.


Jason
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Mark0159
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Sep 05, 2013 23:14 |  #24

I have always found that canon camera's are about 1/3 stop darker than what's a good exposure and when I was shooting in an auto mode I would dial that in to exposure comp and that gave me the right look to the photo. Even with my 6D I noticed that it's a 1/3 stop darker than what I would consider the correct exposure.

However being a number of stops out could be caused by the camera. It's hard to know and it's not something people generally try and test for.


Mark
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Sep 06, 2013 04:07 as a reply to  @ Mark0159's post |  #25

Do you have ALO active? Sometimes the result is surprising.


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Comerfjc
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Sep 06, 2013 12:19 |  #26

apersson850 wrote in post #16272376 (external link)
Do you have ALO active? Sometimes the result is surprising.

I did. Going to be running some tests without it and see what difference it makes. So far, there doesn't seem to be a *whole* lot of difference.


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h4rsx
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Nov 04, 2013 05:45 |  #27

Hi,

I too have a Canon 6D and have noticed the underexposure problem, which is how I came to find this.

I too have the 5D MKII, which as many have stated provides exposures in balance with the histogram.

Having tried to shoot waterfalls, which do have bright white areas as long exposures of the water, the camera in AV mode was knocking the exposure back atleast by a stop.

I initially though there was something wrong with the metering or that I had an incorrect setting applied which was causing this.

It's really odd behaviour. There's 5 years worth of more technology in the 6D over the 5D MKII, so it should be nailing the shots everytime!




  
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Nov 04, 2013 16:59 |  #28

Bakewell wrote in post #16264744 (external link)
I have noticed the 6D tends to underexpose, hence I set exposure compensation to +2/3.

Same here.


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dsphotography
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Dec 08, 2013 23:35 as a reply to  @ gfspencer's post |  #29

I too am experiencing metering issues with the 6D. I am getting way underexposed images (maybe 2/3 to 1 stop) and am also getting a green tint or cast on a lot of my images. I have never had either of these problems on my previous cameras, and they were compact point and shoots (both Canon by the way)! I am also getting images with blown out highlights. I can, of course, compensate for the underexposed and overexposed images but it seems like the 6D should be a lot more accurate in its metering. I definitely expected more from a nearly $2000 camera body.

If anyone else is experiencing the same issues please let me know. I'm especially interested in knowing if anyone else's images occasionally have a green tint to them.




  
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Dec 08, 2013 23:52 |  #30

dsphotography wrote in post #16512512 (external link)
I too am experiencing metering issues with the 6D. I am getting way underexposed images (maybe 2/3 to 1 stop) and am also getting a green tint or cast on a lot of my images. I have never had either of these problems on my previous cameras, and they were compact point and shoots (both Canon by the way)! I am also getting images with blown out highlights. I can, of course, compensate for the underexposed and overexposed images but it seems like the 6D should be a lot more accurate in its metering. I definitely expected more from a nearly $2000 camera body.

If anyone else is experiencing the same issues please let me know. I'm especially interested in knowing if anyone else's images occasionally have a green tint to them.

Post an example of the green tint issue. My guess is it's probably a fluorescent light issue, or one of incorrect white balance.
As for exposure accuracy, again, an example or two would be good. Guessing here, I'd suggest that it is likely an issue of a scene with a great deal of light or dark, under which circumstances the camera relies on you to give it a hand via EC.




  
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Purchased 6D, encountering metering issues?
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