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Thread started 13 Nov 2013 (Wednesday) 06:54
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At what temp do you start using plastic bags?

 
Frodge
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Nov 13, 2013 06:54 |  #1

I was wondering at what temperature (going from cold outside to warm inside) do you start feeling the necessity to use plastic bags to prevent fog on the components? What kind of bags do you use to fit a camera with the lens attached?


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Gregg.Siam
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Nov 13, 2013 07:09 |  #2

never

A little fog or condensation has never bothered my 5D3. Even here in the tropical climate, it is very rare to get conditions that cause any noticeable condensation or at a level that would worry me.


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Jim_T
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Nov 13, 2013 07:56 |  #3

Gregg.Siam wrote in post #16447830 (external link)
never.

+1 It gets cold where I live and I've never had a problem with condensation in the winter.




  
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John ­ from ­ PA
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Nov 13, 2013 07:57 |  #4

You have to understand the concept of dewpoint and to help do that you may want to visit http://www.dpcalc.org/ (external link) for an online dewpoint calculator.

Condensation will begin to form theoretically when a cold surface is below the dewpoint temperature of the surrounding air. Take an example of the average winter home environment where the inside air temperature is 68°F and the relative humidity is 35%. The dewpoint calculator I linked to will show the dewpoint is 39°F. That means if you bring a camera indoors that has any surface temperatures of 39°or less then condensation will likely form. It may actually form at a somewhat higher temperature since dust in the air may allow earlier condension. So, as an example, if the camera is 40° or 41° the the potential of condensation is high.

The warmer you keep you home obviously will affect the dewpoint. If your home is at 72° and still the same relative humidity of 35%, then the dewpoint goes up to 42°. So now that camera is much more susceptible to condensation given the same outdoor temperature wher it was used.

Personally I feel it doesn't hurt to "bag it" anytime I have been outdoors for an extended period (perhaps over an hour) and the outside temperature is less than 40°. I also have a rule of thumb of a 1/2 hour in the bag for every hour outdoors, up to about 2 to 3 hours. In other words if I've been outdoors for three hours I leave the camera bagged for about 1-1/2 hours. If I've been outside for 8 hours I still only bag it for about 2 hours.




  
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MalVeauX
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Nov 13, 2013 08:01 |  #5

Heya,

I find that condensation/fog is not an issue except at transition points (like going from indoors to outdoors, and vise verse, if the temperature difference is large). Kind of slows you down if you're inside, it's warm, and outside is cold, and you see a moment (sky shot for example?) and jump up and go outside thinking you're going to start doing exposures of stars, only to realize, your lens is fogged due to the temperature change. So you have to give it time for the temperature to balance out and the fog will go away. Takes time though.

Happens a lot to me when I'm inside (68 f) and go outside for macro shots in 95 f (Florida) weather. Instant fog. Gotta let my equipment "warm up."

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John ­ from ­ PA
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Nov 13, 2013 08:12 |  #6

Using MalVeauX numbers one can see why condensation can occur. Using his outdoor temperature of 95° and a relative humidity of 70% the dewpoint is 84°. So the camera, at the indoor temperature of 68° is well below the dewpoint of 84° so condensation forms.

That happened on one occasion to yield me a great picture. Many years ago I was at Parris Island for a Marine Corps Basic Training graduation. I got out of an air conditioned car and quickly fired off some pictures of the Iwo Jima memorial. They all uniformly exhibited quite a bit of fog giving an eerie effect to the pictures.




  
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sandpiper
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Nov 13, 2013 08:13 as a reply to  @ MalVeauX's post |  #7

"Never" for me as well. If the lenses fog up I just wait for them to clear before I start shooting.




  
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I ­ Love ­ Cats
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Nov 13, 2013 09:36 |  #8
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I couldn't resist the title for this one. I thought it had something to do with the pot-smelling 7D.

I take my cameras from 75 degree A/C in the summer to 100+ temperature and 95%+ humidity in the summer. Also from 74 degree humidified house to below zero outside in winter. I've shot swim-meets in winter, where it is hot and humid indoors and below freezing outdoors. I've never had a problem with cameras and condensation.

One question, though. Do you also put your watch, cell phone and laptop in plastic bags? The electronics are similar. This reminds of people who unplug their coffee pot before leaving the house. When I ask if they also unplug the refrigerator, they look at me like I am the nut-case.




  
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dpds68
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Nov 13, 2013 09:48 |  #9

Never and I live in the Caribbean , I used to have a problem with a bit of fog on my Gear coming from my A/C Room to the hot outside I used to have it out in the heat still in my bag for about 1/2 Hour before shooting for temps to equalize but have solved that by now storing my Gear outside in a non A/C Room .


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Sparky98
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Nov 13, 2013 10:17 |  #10

I keep my camera in a backpack which offers some insulation and allows for some gradual warming or cooling when I move from one environment to another. I rarely go directly from inside to outside or vice versa so it has never been a problem for me. I have had my sunglasses fog up when getting in or out of my truck and that makes me aware of potential fogging problems on my camera.


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Kanye
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Nov 13, 2013 13:19 |  #11

It's a good idea to probably keep a couple of rice or silicone gel bags in your gear bag, to absorb any humidity.




  
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dexy101
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Nov 13, 2013 16:33 |  #12

I shoot a lot outside late at night, its always good to carry a bag for when you get in and stick it in a bag regardless. A few people have said it doesn't bother them, but I'm sure it will once the corrosion sets in and starts frying components.




  
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sandpiper
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Nov 13, 2013 17:52 |  #13

dexy101 wrote in post #16449309 (external link)
I shoot a lot outside late at night, its always good to carry a bag for when you get in and stick it in a bag regardless. A few people have said it doesn't bother them, but I'm sure it will once the corrosion sets in and starts frying components.

You say that as though it were a certain consequence, not an "if", and that those of us "foolish" enough to not bag the camera are just living on borrowed time before they fail.

My old 20D and 5Dc were first exposed to this sort of thing about 8-9 years ago, going from cold outside temperatures into tropical rainforest heat and humidity at butterfly houses and walk through tropical exhibits at zoos etc. They would fog up and take 45 minutes to defog before I could shoot. This has happened on many occasions, they have also been used in the rain quite often too, as have their replacements over the years.

So far, the corrosion hasn't fried anything, none of my cameras has died yet. I have had cameras shut down (or start showing random wierd crap on the LCDs) on a couple of occasions because water has got in, but the next day after drying out they were fine.

I'm not saying that water cannot get in and damage them, there has been some degree of luck involved I presume, but I am not about to worry that letting them fog up in high humidity conditions is
going to corrode the components some time in the future.

You may be "sure" that it will bother me when that corrosion finally sets in (after 8-9 years) and fries my components, but I can assure you that it won't. The 20D was passed on to a friend a couple of years back after I upgraded to a newer crop body, and the 5Dc now sits in the bag most of the time as a backup while I use my 5DIII. If the corrosion finally kills it after about 8 years of serious abuse, I may mourn its passing as a faithful old sidekick, but I doubt that I will be particularly concerned about losing an aging, old camera that I rarely use and can be replaced quite cheaply these days (and is insured against all damage anyway).

I'm not saying that there is no risk in exposing cameras to such conditions as sudden tropical humidity or shooting in the rain, but equally many, many people overly nanny there gear and miss out on potentially great shots because they don't want to risk what is, essentially, a tool.




  
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goldboughtrue
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Nov 13, 2013 17:56 |  #14
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Frodge wrote in post #16447797 (external link)
What kind of bags do you use to fit a camera with the lens attached?

Any plastic bag will do. I use one I got at the store.


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dexy101
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Nov 13, 2013 18:32 |  #15

sandpiper wrote in post #16449521 (external link)
I'm not saying that there is no risk in exposing cameras to such conditions as sudden tropical humidity or shooting in the rain,


So why waste all that time typing out something to try and ridicule me? I don't care what your cameras have been through, you even say yourself it can happen.

Just because its not happened to you doesn't mean it does not happen. And then you say..

" I have had cameras shut down (or start showing random wierd crap on the LCDs) on a couple of occasions because water has got in"

.. so that further backs up what I say, just because its not fried doesn't mean its not setting in, you are a bit delusional to think that water is just going in and drying up without any damage happening what so ever.

sandpiper wrote in post #16449521 (external link)
many people overly nanny there gear and miss out on potentially great shots because they don't want to risk what is, essentially, a tool.

But you are happy to wait for 45 minutes to let fog clear off lens, LOL

Don't worry though, I don't mind how you treat your gear as I'm sure you don't care how mines been treated.




  
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At what temp do you start using plastic bags?
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