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Thread started 04 Nov 2013 (Monday) 02:41
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Balance heavy tripod (gimbal) on backpack - hiking

 
roger1234
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Nov 04, 2013 02:41 |  #1

May I ask how does super-telephoto users strap their heavy duty tripod during hike? I tried that at the center of the back (most popular orientation), but it tired me our rather too fast!

The backpack I have is thinktank that has slot at the back and the side. The weight of the combo (everything include tripod) is approximate 20 lbs (8~9 lbs belong to super-telephoto).

I'm specifically refer to the duration of "hiking to the spot", where everything isn't suppose to be taken out during the hike unless opportunities come. This could take more than an hour.

I'm guessing the position of the tripod makes the center of gravity of the backpack much further than my body's center of gravity, hence reduce the balance provided by hip belt. I'm also worry tighting it to the side since I have a curved spin, but in that position the tripod is closer to the body.

Any suggestions?




  
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Miki ­ G
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Nov 04, 2013 02:59 |  #2

I just carry mine under my arm (with the tripod head facing down) whilst holding the adjustment knob as a grip. It's easy to change hands if you feel any tiredness. The tripod is comfortable to carry, even over long distances, but may be awkward on rough ground if you need your hands to be free.




  
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nordlysBW
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Nov 04, 2013 10:48 as a reply to  @ Miki G's post |  #3

Tripod with gimbal, lens not mounted for me when on the move. I wade a lot in salty water.

Lowepro 500AW with two tripod leg ends in the flap-out tripod holding pouch at the bottom of the Lowepro, Lowepro tripod strap in the middle + extra strap (or 2 for rugged terrain) threaded through the Lowepro carrying handle at the top and the neck of the gimbal. I of course block free rotation of the gimbal for that.




  
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roger1234
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Nov 13, 2013 18:51 |  #4

Wow thanks for the replies! So few of us who willing to carry it to the wild (contrast to driving, etc).

Miki G I tried (without gimbal just ballhead) don't think I can carry that for such a long distance, maybe I need to work out first. :o




  
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airdima
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Nov 14, 2013 04:18 |  #5

i'm not a wildlife shooter but i do landscapes and that also involves carrying heavy gear and hiking
the last thing i would recommend is using the tripod straps that are located on the front of the back (further away from the body). that will mess up your CG completely and kill both your shoulders and the lower back. in fact i never understood the logic behind such designs

if your bag has additional attachment points on the sides or underneath you should use them.
best thing would be to attach tghe tripod horizontally underneath the bag. second best is attaching on the side of the bag while counterbalancing it from the other side with either a water bottle or a hydration bladder

if you have no attachment points i would just carry the tripod in the hand or over the shoulder

hell you could even figure out a way to strap it to your chest, which would help you counter balance the bag


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badams
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Nov 14, 2013 16:34 |  #6

I hand-hold the majority of my time so I can't really comment. I try not to hike that far (1 mile or less, one way) while carrying the 500.


Everyday use: 7D2, 1.4x v3 Canon TC (sometimes the 2x v2 Canon TC), Canon 500mm f4 L IS USM; 6D, 24-105L
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johnf3f
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Nov 14, 2013 17:53 |  #7

roger1234 wrote in post #16422729 (external link)
May I ask how does super-telephoto users strap their heavy duty tripod during hike? I tried that at the center of the back (most popular orientation), but it tired me our rather too fast!

The backpack I have is thinktank that has slot at the back and the side. The weight of the combo (everything include tripod) is approximate 20 lbs (8~9 lbs belong to super-telephoto).

I'm specifically refer to the duration of "hiking to the spot", where everything isn't suppose to be taken out during the hike unless opportunities come. This could take more than an hour.

I'm guessing the position of the tripod makes the center of gravity of the backpack much further than my body's center of gravity, hence reduce the balance provided by hip belt. I'm also worry tighting it to the side since I have a curved spin, but in that position the tripod is closer to the body.

Any suggestions?

Just my 2p
I don't go hiking with my full wildlife gear - but that is because it weighs around 20 Kilos!
Anyway a few days ago I was taking out my wildlife kit and decided to put my tripod (Gitzo GT3530LS) on the back of the pack instead of it's normal position on the side. After a few hundred yards I commented that my pack felt heavier than usual. I moved it back to the side of the pack and it promptly felt lighter?! It must be something to do with weight distribution but the effect was quite noticeable.


Life is for living, cameras are to capture it (one day I will learn how!).

  
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Balance heavy tripod (gimbal) on backpack - hiking
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