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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Motorsports Talk 
Thread started 09 Sep 2013 (Monday) 06:45
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How do I get a sharp FULL image

 
aphphoto
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Sep 10, 2013 18:00 |  #16

DC Fan wrote in post #16283908 (external link)
Focus settings and equipment don't matter. All that counts is a photographer's skill in smoothly tracking a subject and the will to keep working at slower and slower shutter speeds until a frame works.

Repeating your little mantra does not make it true. A few tweaks may make a world of difference to the ease and repeatability of obtaining good results.


who gives a rat crap how much gear you can list?

  
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330cic
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Oct 03, 2013 10:55 |  #17

I had the same question:

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1331682


SteveH
Canon 7D, Sigma 10-20, Canon 50 f1.8, Canon 18-135 IS, Sigma 70-200 f2.8, Sigma 150-500

  
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OneJZsupra
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Nov 16, 2013 05:01 |  #18

aphphoto wrote in post #16286083 (external link)
Repeating your little mantra does not make it true. A few tweaks may make a world of difference to the ease and repeatability of obtaining good results.

I would like to say (Going on to what he is saying) that knowing the correct focus settings and such would help quite a bit. If he doesn't know what settings are the normal settings for panning photos and what not than he might not good the correct results he is after.

IMAGE: http://www.christopherrhoadsphotography.com/Events/Daytona-Coke-Zero-400/i-3QQL4c2/0/L/CRR_9145_1-L.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.christopher​rhoadsphotography.com …Coke-Zero-400/i-3QQL4c2/A  (external link)

Camera Canon EOS 7D
ISO 100
Focal Length 200mm (320mm in 35mm)
Aperture f/8
Exposure Time 0.005s (1/200)
Name CRR_9145_1.jpg
Size 5184 x 3456


Here I used my 7D and 70-200 in mode 2 (For IS which is meant for panning). I used AI servo with center cross point to help track him while he was making his hot laps.

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DC ­ Fan
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Nov 16, 2013 09:57 as a reply to  @ OneJZsupra's post |  #19

One of the oddities of the slow shutter speed panning technique is that as you develop and advance your skills with the method, you get fewer usable images.

After you find that a given slow shutter speed provides something resembling consistent results, it's time to use an even slower shutter speed and see what happens.

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D
Lens: EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM
Image Date: 2013-08-16 17:38:05 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 170.0mm
Aperture: f/13.0
Exposure Time: 0.033 s (1/30)
ISO equiv: 100
Exposure Bias: +1.00 EV
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)

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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 60D
Lens: EF-S18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS
Image Date: 2011-09-18 10:52:36 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 200.0mm
Aperture: f/16.0
Exposure Time: 0.025 s (1/40)
ISO equiv: 100
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)
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Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
Lens: EF70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
Image Date: 2008-07-20 13:26:41 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 150.0mm
Aperture: f/40.0
Exposure Time: 0.077 s (1/13)
ISO equiv: 200
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)
White Balance: Auto
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Comment:

As the shutter speed drops, the number of so-called "keepers" will decrease, but the few usable images will likely have an even more effectively blurred background. As already noted, this technique is not for those who judge photographic success by standards of efficiency. It's for the adventuresome photographer and the artist who enjoys the surprises of coincidence.


Another interesting factor: while many sports photographers teach the concept of having a clean background, a cluttered background is most useful for the panning technique, to provide something to create the illusion of motion blur.



  
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330cic
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Nov 20, 2013 19:16 |  #20

I'm finding 1/80 to 1/100 give me some nice shots with a great keep rate. Any slower and I just can't seem to hit the mark.


SteveH
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Picturesports
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Jan 04, 2014 11:19 |  #21

This question comes up a lot ... Klippe had a wonderful diagram and explanation of the physics involved. I did a quick search but couldn't find it - looks like he took the images down .

So ....

Start with 1/320 of a second and adjust the ISO so that you get something between F5.6 and F10 (point the camera at the track and take a reading)

At 1/320 you will get wheel blur and a sharp car.

How low you need to go to get the pan effect is a question of how far away the car is, how long a lens you are using and the state of the background you are trying to blur..

If you are using a 70-200 and Tv mode then 1/80 will give you a good blur. 1/60 and you will start to get parallax error unless the centre of the car is directly square to the sensor when the shutter closes.

As the shutter speed gets lower the more accurate you need to be to get the whole car in focus, but why bother? The objective of the pan is blur background. If it is blurred then - Cool never mind going lower.

All the guys who talk 1/20 or 1/10 of a second and show you a crisp pan shot will have taken hundreds and kept one (trust me on this!!)

The shot below was taken at 600mm, F13 and 1/160 of a second. The background blurred & car sharp.

IMAGE: http://www.picturesports.co.uk/img/s10/v110/p1884040367-5.jpg

In the next one you can see parallax error creeping in (nose and tail of the car) 1/60 @ F11 focal length 120mm, however the background is "diirty" and so a greater level of blur is required.

IMAGE: http://www.picturesports.co.uk/img/s9/v96/p2013488496-5.jpg


The objective is the shot you want not the numbers. F14 tops - F8 even better. The side of the car is flat, so you don't need massive depth of field, in fact if the background is OOF then all the better - it blurs better :-)

www.picturesports.co.u​k (external link)

  
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jj_glos
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Jan 20, 2014 05:02 |  #22

DC Fan wrote in post #16455931 (external link)
One of the oddities of the slow shutter speed panning technique is that as you develop and advance your skills with the method, you get fewer usable images.

After you find that a given slow shutter speed provides something resembling consistent results, it's time to use an even slower shutter speed and see what happens.

snipped

As the shutter speed drops, the number of so-called "keepers" will decrease, but the few usable images will likely have an even more effectively blurred background. As already noted, this technique is not for those who judge photographic success by standards of efficiency. It's for the adventuresome photographer and the artist who enjoys the surprises of coincidence.


Another interesting factor: while many sports photographers teach the concept of having a clean background, a cluttered background is most useful for the panning technique, to provide something to create the illusion of motion blur.

Oh yes indeed, the eternal quest for ever slower shutter speeds is a painful one! :D

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8546/8620614808_8fb0f0ab65_o.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/jj_glos/8620614​808/  (external link)
Prescott Speed Hill Climb (external link) by jj_glos (external link), on Flickr



  
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How do I get a sharp FULL image
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