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Thread started 29 Nov 2013 (Friday) 05:12
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The perfect travel kit, does it exist?

 
DocFrankenstein
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Nov 30, 2013 08:59 |  #46

stang67 wrote in post #16489597 (external link)
Micro 4/3rds isn't really there just yet IMO (it may never) simply due to the fact it's difficult to get amazing IQ (read: IQ, not pictures) out of such a small sensor. However, an E-M5 with a 12-40 2.8 (which I HOPE to get for myself as a Christmas present) will be my ideal walk-around combo (and would be my travel setup). That combo is very sharp, has a great range, is 2.8, is weather-sealed and can do an effective 0.6x magnification. To get a significant step up in IQ and ISO performance, one really needs to go to FF (although the Sigma Merrill is amazing for IQ, but it is essentially useless in every other regard). However, the four thirds sensor is still great due to the large DOF at large apertures (so you can shoot in low lit environments but still have much larger room for error DOF/focus wise).

I just think it's too difficult to come up with a 'perfect' travel kit, as one is always compromising whether it be on size, weight, IQ, lens selection, ISO performance, cost etc. I definitely see the advantage of mirrorless for travel though.

I don't know if 4/3 is relevant at this point. Sony already released full frame in mirrorless in the same size. It's just a matter of time until all others jump on the bandwagon.

4/3 was barely adequate in terms of image quality when it was released and I don't see that small of a sensor offering something competitive a year or two from now.


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masberg24
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Nov 30, 2013 09:11 |  #47

Olympus em-1 :)




  
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MotorPro
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Nov 30, 2013 11:20 as a reply to  @ post 16488224 |  #48

Simple answer......NO!




  
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Dave ­ Jenkins
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Nov 30, 2013 17:18 |  #49

The perfect travel kit is a dream which will never reach complete fulfillment, IMO. But we keep trying.

I went to Italy in 2005 with a pair of 20Ds, to Israel in 2010 with a 5D Classic and a 20D, and to El Salvador in 2013 with a pair of OMD-5s and three lenses. Photos from all were excellent, and I think the image quality from the OMDs was about even with the 5D. The OMDs are clearly the winner in the weight sweepstakes, as the whole kit of two cameras and three lenses weigh about the same as the 5D with the 24-85mm lens. However, I don't think I've reached Nirvanna yet. I may be going to the Philippines early next year to document the work of a missions team, and if I do, I'm looking at taking a 6D with the original 24mm f2.8, the 40mm f2.8, and either the 100mm f2 or the 70-210 f3.5-4.5. For backup with that kit, I would either get a 60D or take my OMD-5 with the 14-150 lens.

Anyway, that's my thinking now. We'll see how it shakes out. :grin:

The great travel photographer Gerald Brimacombe (http://www.geraldbrima​combe.com/Index.htm (external link)) told me recently that he now goes abroad with nothing but one Nikon D600 and a 24-120 lens. I'm not brave enough to travel with just one camera, but it does minimize the load!


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stang67
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Nov 30, 2013 17:57 |  #50

DocFrankenstein wrote in post #16490144 (external link)
I don't know if 4/3 is relevant at this point. Sony already released full frame in mirrorless in the same size. It's just a matter of time until all others jump on the bandwagon.

4/3 was barely adequate in terms of image quality when it was released and I don't see that small of a sensor offering something competitive a year or two from now.

It doesn't matter if Sony has released full frame mirrorless. It is still bigger, heavier, has a tiny native mount FE lens selection (adaptor is just another thing to lose on holiday) and is expensive (could get stolen etc). I would consider that far from perfect, even if IQ is undoubtedly leagues ahead.


Canon 6D - Canon 1D Mk III - 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | Σ 105mm f/2.8 | Canon 400mm f/5.6L | Σ 35mm f/1.4 | 17-40mm f/4L
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Gobeatty
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Nov 30, 2013 19:54 |  #51

Had a another reminder today of why I prefer my 6D over previous cameras. Went to the zoo in 30 degree temps and was at our zoo last year at about this time. My Fuji XE-1's battery had no tolerance for the cold and crapped out after about 69 shots. The battery was fully charged at the start and typically gave 200-300 shots per charge.

Today, we were out in the cold for several hours and with 159 shots done the battery was still at 84%. It's like the difference between a toy and a professional tool. That said, I was reviewing bubble show photos I made last year with the XE-1 and wow - very nice indeed. The battery issue can be addressed by carrying extras, but then you are trading back the weight you thought you saved.

I also see the post above on one camera/one lens. A 6D with a 24-105 could do nicely. If DOF of f4 or greater is needed anyway, then why bother lugging any additional glass unless you need 150+mm or ultrawide for your shooting style. I believe the 105 zoom could be cropped to 150 equivalent easily and longer out to 210 equivalent if you don't mind the occasional 5mp image. Multiple shots at the 24 end could be stitched for wider. Ymmv of course :-)


6D | 35 f2 | 50 1.8 | 85 1.8 | 28 - 135 f3.5 - 5.6 | 70-210 f4

  
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Hogloff
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Nov 30, 2013 20:26 |  #52
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DocFrankenstein wrote in post #16490144 (external link)
I don't know if 4/3 is relevant at this point. Sony already released full frame in mirrorless in the same size. It's just a matter of time until all others jump on the bandwagon.

4/3 was barely adequate in terms of image quality when it was released and I don't see that small of a sensor offering something competitive a year or two from now.

Yes...the AR7 is nice and compact...what about the lens. 4/3 lens are nice and small...and as far as image quality goes, it is damn good to the point that I would bet 10 photos hung up on the wall and you could not identify which photo came from which camera.




  
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Hogloff
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Nov 30, 2013 20:28 |  #53
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Gobeatty wrote in post #16491395 (external link)
Had a another reminder today of why I prefer my 6D over previous cameras. Went to the zoo in 30 degree temps and was at our zoo last year at about this time. My Fuji XE-1's battery had no tolerance for the cold and crapped out after about 69 shots. The battery was fully charged at the start and typically gave 200-300 shots per charge.

Today, we were out in the cold for several hours and with 159 shots done the battery was still at 84%. It's like the difference between a toy and a professional tool. That said, I was reviewing bubble show photos I made last year with the XE-1 and wow - very nice indeed. The battery issue can be addressed by carrying extras, but then you are trading back the weight you thought you saved.

I also see the post above on one camera/one lens. A 6D with a 24-105 could do nicely. If DOF of f4 or greater is needed anyway, then why bother lugging any additional glass unless you need 150+mm or ultrawide for your shooting style. I believe the 105 zoom could be cropped to 150 equivalent easily and longer out to 210 equivalent if you don't mind the occasional 5mp image. Multiple shots at the 24 end could be stitched for wider. Ymmv of course :-)

Put a couple of extra very small batteries into your pocket...problem solved.




  
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speedync
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Nov 30, 2013 20:54 as a reply to  @ Hogloff's post |  #54

Of course it does. As long as you are happy with it, and it does what you want. This will most likely be different for every photographer, as everyone puts different values on various attributes. And the perfect kit will most likely also change as the photographer gains more experience, ages, or acquires a family for instance. What is perfect for one particular person, may be less than perfect for another. What is perfect now, may not be in the future. Who cares? As long as it works for YOU. :)




  
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DocFrankenstein
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Nov 30, 2013 21:33 |  #55

Hogloff wrote in post #16491469 (external link)
Yes...the AR7 is nice and compact...what about the lens. 4/3 lens are nice and small...and as far as image quality goes, it is damn good to the point that I would bet 10 photos hung up on the wall and you could not identify which photo came from which camera.

I've actually shot with an olympus 4/3. I'd have to become blind not to be able to tell the difference in real world shooting.

stang67 wrote in post #16491165 (external link)
It doesn't matter if Sony has released full frame mirrorless. It is still bigger, heavier, has a tiny native mount FE lens selection (adaptor is just another thing to lose on holiday) and is expensive (could get stolen etc). I would consider that far from perfect, even if IQ is undoubtedly leagues ahead.

If you can't afford to lose the camera, you shouldn't buy it in the first place. Give sigma a few weeks and you'll have lens options. The system is was released five seconds ago.


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stang67
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Nov 30, 2013 22:15 |  #56

DocFrankenstein wrote in post #16491588 (external link)
If you can't afford to lose the camera, you shouldn't buy it in the first place.

That's ridiculous. One must be absolutely loaded to be able to lose ~$2000 and it not be a problem.


Canon 6D - Canon 1D Mk III - 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | Σ 105mm f/2.8 | Canon 400mm f/5.6L | Σ 35mm f/1.4 | 17-40mm f/4L
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DocFrankenstein
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Nov 30, 2013 22:54 |  #57

stang67 wrote in post #16491668 (external link)
That's ridiculous. One must be absolutely loaded to be able to lose ~$2000 and it not be a problem.

It depends on how you think of ridiculous.

For me, it's ridiculous to own a digital camera that's "too good to be used" or being afraid to lose it. Digital cameras are not investments. Digital rot gives them 2-3 years of useful life before I upgrade them. If I baby them, I don't get pictures which are the return on my investment.

When you buy a digital camera, you lose your 2000 bucks when you swipe your credit card. When it gets stolen or broken two years down the road, you lose a piece of electronics at the end of its useful life, not 2 grand.

To me, it seems ridiculous missing out on pictures for fear of losing your camera. Camera will become worthless. Pictures will give value.

Now, some cameras, like some Leicas, it makes no sense to bang up. But they're collectables and investment vehicles, not consumables. Sony digiwonders are not collectables.


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Gobeatty
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Dec 01, 2013 00:19 |  #58

Hogloff wrote in post #16491473 (external link)
Put a couple of extra very small batteries into your pocket...problem solved.

I agree :-)

It's a great camera - but loses out in the high ISO stakes and other areas such as usability as well. It was just an example of where the smaller (?) kit is at times outshined by the larger kit.

I am very drawn to to Fuji as their kit is closest to the now vintage kit I used to use, except Leica which I likely can't afford (but believe its well worth the price).


6D | 35 f2 | 50 1.8 | 85 1.8 | 28 - 135 f3.5 - 5.6 | 70-210 f4

  
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stang67
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Dec 01, 2013 00:43 |  #59

DocFrankenstein wrote in post #16491745 (external link)
It depends on how you think of ridiculous.

For me, it's ridiculous to own a digital camera that's "too good to be used" or being afraid to lose it.

When you buy a digital camera, you lose your 2000 bucks when you swipe your credit card. When it gets stolen or broken two years down the road, you lose a piece of electronics at the end of its useful life, not 2 grand.

Well if one fears the camera will be "too good to be used" and that would make them feel bad about purchasing it, then they just don't purchase it. Also, while you may have spent $2000, if you sell the camera you could get most of that back depending on the item (and time you've had it etc), so I wouldn't go far as to say "you lose a piece of electronics at the end of its useful life, not 2 grand."


Canon 6D - Canon 1D Mk III - 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | Σ 105mm f/2.8 | Canon 400mm f/5.6L | Σ 35mm f/1.4 | 17-40mm f/4L
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kram
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Dec 01, 2013 02:13 |  #60

I have started carrying the 6D+24-105 as my travel set. The 7D with 100-400 becomes the second set when I travel to Africa for wildlife trips....


Canon 7D , Canon 6D, 100-400 L, 24-105 F4 L, 50 F1.4, Tokina 12-24 F4, Kenko Teleplus Pro DG 1.4X Extender
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The perfect travel kit, does it exist?
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