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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Astronomy & Celestial Talk 
Thread started 03 Jan 2014 (Friday) 19:25
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how so clear photo with all the Co2

 
waynesplash
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Jan 03, 2014 19:25 |  #1

Hi there,

I was wondering with all the Gases up in the Sky, how come I can get so good of a clear photo of the Moon, I thought with all the 1000000s of Ton of all different Gases up there, it would be like Heat Haze from say a CAR, or on a hazing Day when you cant get a shot.

Wayne




  
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hollis_f
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Jan 04, 2014 06:37 |  #2

Do a Google on what makes stars twinkle.


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Nighthound
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Jan 05, 2014 12:25 |  #3

The quality of the shot will vary depending on the elevation of the moon as well as atmospheric stability. Radiational cooling and winds aloft are just a couple of issues that will affect image quality. Low elevation shots suffer from atmospheric distortion due to density of thousands of miles of the aforementioned problems. Think of this as a sheet of glass. Look straight through the sheet and it's clear, turn the sheet on its edge and the mass/density of the sheet impairs visibility. The more atmosphere you're looking through, the more negative visibility issues are compiled in your field of view. My best lunar shots were all taken with the moon at or above 45 degrees up. In the warmer months it helps to shoot well after dark to allow the radiational cooling to subside. There are nights that even the ideal time or elevation won't help, sometimes the seeing conditions just don't improve to acceptable. There are some nights when clarity comes and goes and you can get lucky with repeated exposures.


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grayline
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Jan 08, 2014 09:31 |  #4

hollis_f wrote in post #16576530 (external link)
Do a Google on what makes stars twinkle.

Ha ! I see we somewhat share a field. I have a degree in metroligy !
I measured stuff and matter and you measured light and the effects.
I specialized in metalurgy content and the ageing of metals under sunlight and time


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waynesplash
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Jan 12, 2014 17:51 |  #5

hollis_f wrote in post #16576530 (external link)
Do a Google on what makes stars twinkle.

Yes I get that, but still with all those Gases in the Sky, or are there really that much; I don't think so, as how can I get a crystal clear photo of the Moon.

Wayne




  
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waynesplash
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Jan 12, 2014 17:54 |  #6

Nighthound wrote in post #16579683 (external link)
The quality of the shot will vary depending on the elevation of the moon as well as atmospheric stability. Radiational cooling and winds aloft are just a couple of issues that will affect image quality. Low elevation shots suffer from atmospheric distortion due to density of thousands of miles of the aforementioned problems. Think of this as a sheet of glass. Look straight through the sheet and it's clear, turn the sheet on its edge and the mass/density of the sheet impairs visibility. The more atmosphere you're looking through, the more negative visibility issues are compiled in your field of view. My best lunar shots were all taken with the moon at or above 45 degrees up. In the warmer months it helps to shoot well after dark to allow the radiational cooling to subside. There are nights that even the ideal time or elevation won't help, sometimes the seeing conditions just don't improve to acceptable. There are some nights when clarity comes and goes and you can get lucky with repeated exposures.

Ok thank you. Just gets to me when there is supposed to be so much up there, why cant we see it in shots and why does not shots get distorted, like they would with heat haze. Maybe there is not that much Human stuff up there after all, or all the stuff that's goes up get dissntergrated some how.

Wayne




  
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SteveInNZ
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Jan 12, 2014 18:12 |  #7

The gases you are looking through are transparent. That includes CO2 which is only 0.04% of the atmosphere. The majority of the atmosphere is Nitrogen, then Oxygen, etc which are all also clear.
It's just like looking through glass. It's not until the atmosphere starts to move that you get distortions that blur your image.
Of course, that doesn't include clouds which are formed when someone buys a new part for their telescope.

Steve.


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sandpiper
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Jan 12, 2014 18:32 |  #8

waynesplash wrote in post #16600173 (external link)
Ok thank you. Just gets to me when there is supposed to be so much up there, why cant we see it in shots and why does not shots get distorted, like they would with heat haze. Maybe there is not that much Human stuff up there after all, or all the stuff that's goes up get dissntergrated some how.

Wayne

Well, yeah, there isn't that much human crap in the atmosphere, once you clear the initial layer of pollution that hangs around down low.

You talk about "all the CO2" as if the atmosphere is full of the stuff, it just isn't. The proportions of the gases that make up the atmosphere have changed significantly over billions of years, but little has changed since man started to walk the earth. Whilst it is true that we are releasing millions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere, it is still a very small drop in a very large ocean, so to speak.

Our atmosphere is only about 0.035% CO2 (thats about 1 part in 3000) so it is spread pretty thin. 78.1% is nitrogen and 20.9% is oxygen, with the remaining 1% made up mostly of Argon (0.9%). The remaining 0.1% comprises several gases which are present as trace elements. CO2, despite the media hype about our changing atmosphere and the rapid increase in the stuff, is still just a trace element.

You have, I presume, grown up being able to see through the air. Why do you suddenly question that you are able to do so? The gases that make up the air we live in are clear and transparent, you can't see them unless they are acted upon and you see something such as a heat shimmer (not much of that once you get any distance above the planet surface.




  
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waynesplash
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Apr 17, 2014 17:16 |  #9

Hi all,

A very big sorry for not saying thank you to the above posters, that’s very interesting.

Wayne




  
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smasraum
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Apr 18, 2014 16:31 |  #10

I would say the simple answer to your problem is that you aren't magnifying enough to see the distortion.

Get a telescope and try to zoom in on something at 300-400x magnification, especially the moon. You'll see exactly the effect that you're asking about. I've got an 8" Newtonian telescope and if I go for the really high mag on the moon, it looks exactly like I'm looking at it over a hot street. I believe the effect has more to do with temperature differentials in different layers of the atmosphere than it does the different gasses in it.

If you search for astronomy and "seeing" you'll probably get a lot more info too.


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how so clear photo with all the Co2
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