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Thread started 09 Jan 2014 (Thursday) 19:56
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RED hot pixels

 
creanzworld
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Jan 09, 2014 19:56 |  #1

So as you can see with the attached photo (if you zoom in) i have alot of hot pixels. Granted, this was taken with very high ISO and lens cap on though, so it's not really that bad for long exposures as this photo makes it appear. But however, I do have a few very noticeable 1-3 red pixels when i do the long exposures. I have done the sensor cleaning, but nothing changed (haven't done manual cleaning yet). Any suggestions?

P.S. I previewed the post and the picture is massive, along with stretched text; so in advance i apologize if that is how it appears to you.

http://fc07.deviantart​.net …_by_steve1098-d71k1xi.jpg (external link)

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Frodge
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Jan 09, 2014 20:06 |  #2

I've never done this test, and dont plan to because of my ocd condition. How do your actual long exposures look? If they have spots they can be mapped out. Has nothing to do with cleaning the sensor.


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“It's kind of fun to do the impossible.” - Walt Disney.
Equipment: Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 40mm 2.8, Tamron 17-50 2.8 XR Di, Canon 18-55mm, Canon 50mm 1.8, Tamron 70-300VC / T3I and 60D

  
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creanzworld
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Jan 09, 2014 20:20 |  #3

Frodge wrote in post #16592556 (external link)
I've never done this test, and dont plan to because of my ocd condition. How do your actual long exposures look? If they have spots they can be mapped out. Has nothing to do with cleaning the sensor.

Yeah i wouldn't advise it if you have OCD. As far as the actual picture, there are roughly 1-5 (depending on the exposure) which are always in the same spots




  
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Frodge
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Jan 09, 2014 20:21 |  #4

You can map them out with the camera function.


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creanzworld
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Jan 09, 2014 21:03 |  #5

Frodge wrote in post #16592585 (external link)
You can map them out with the camera function.

Not really familiar with that function. Can it get rid of the few hot pixels?

Also sorry to change the subject, but i have another question. This i also noticed recently with the long exposure at night. For nighttime long exposures in the past, i used a Canon 17-85mm f/4-5.6, and before that, a 18-55. Both gave pretty good pictures while using low ISO and about 20-30secs was great for a bright, night sky. My 50mm 1.8 is also fantastic obviously due to the wide aperture. However, ironically, my Sigma 17-70 2.8 is terrible. Im sure its a setting on the camera that i mistakenly pushed. I mean its at 2.8 (more than enough light to come in the lens) and it was at 30secs at 200iso. Even at those settings, the sky should be adequately bright; but the night sky was terribly dim. My 18-55 did better, ha. So is there some custom function i might've turned on or something which is preventing me from getting a brightly lit up night sky?




  
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emu248mafia
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Jan 09, 2014 21:12 |  #6

you should make your picture bigger next time.


60D Gripped | Sigma 10mm 2.8 | Canon 17-55mm IS USM 2.8 | Sigma 70-200 OS 2.8 | Sigma 2x teleconverter
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Frodge
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Jan 09, 2014 21:22 |  #7

lol


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the ­ flying ­ moose
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Jan 09, 2014 21:53 |  #8

Large picture is large.

If you squint and zoom in slightly in the top right corner, you can see Jupiter.




  
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davidc502
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Jan 09, 2014 22:10 |  #9

I went to the Dr. and told him it hurts when I hold my arm a certain way. He told me to stop holding my arm that way (and proceeded to charge me a large sum of money). So, if you don't want to see all the hot pixels, don't take shots at high ISO's with the lens cap on (free advise).

cheers,


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adza77
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Jan 10, 2014 00:20 |  #10

creanzworld wrote in post #16592692 (external link)
Not really familiar with that function. Can it get rid of the few hot pixels?

Long Exposure Noise Reduction is what you're chasing.

Basically - it takes a normal photo, and then it takes a second photo without opening up the shutter immediately after. It subtracts any light it sees in the second photo from the first photo, so should significantly reduce the amount of hot pixels you see.

Getting your fair share of hot pixels on long exposures (esp with higher ISO) is expected, which is why the camera's come with this built in feature. :)

Also sorry to change the subject, but i have another question. This i also noticed recently with the long exposure at night. For nighttime long exposures in the past, i used a Canon 17-85mm f/4-5.6, and before that, a 18-55. Both gave pretty good pictures while using low ISO and about 20-30secs was great for a bright, night sky. My 50mm 1.8 is also fantastic obviously due to the wide aperture. However, ironically, my Sigma 17-70 2.8 is terrible. Im sure its a setting on the camera that i mistakenly pushed. I mean its at 2.8 (more than enough light to come in the lens) and it was at 30secs at 200iso. Even at those settings, the sky should be adequately bright; but the night sky was terribly dim. My 18-55 did better, ha. So is there some custom function i might've turned on or something which is preventing me from getting a brightly lit up night sky?

Sorry - you must start a new thread for a new question, lest this one goes off topic. ;)

Did you leave a filter on your Sigma. (I've been known to have accidently done silly things like that, leaving CPL's on and stuff for night photography before. ;-)a.


Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln

  
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creanzworld
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Jan 10, 2014 08:03 |  #11

davidc502 wrote in post #16592840 (external link)
I went to the Dr. and told him it hurts when I hold my arm a certain way. He told me to stop holding my arm that way (and proceeded to charge me a large sum of money). So, if you don't want to see all the hot pixels, don't take shots at high ISO's with the lens cap on (free advise).

cheers,

Touche, lol. But i also did say "Granted, this was taken with very high ISO and lens cap on though, so it's not really that bad for long exposures as this photo makes it appear"




  
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creanzworld
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Jan 10, 2014 08:03 |  #12

the flying moose wrote in post #16592799 (external link)
Large picture is large.

If you squint and zoom in slightly in the top right corner, you can see Jupiter.

lol




  
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creanzworld
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Jan 10, 2014 08:05 |  #13

adza77 wrote in post #16593054 (external link)
Long Exposure Noise Reduction is what you're chasing.

Getting your fair share of hot pixels on long exposures (esp with higher ISO) is expected, which is why the camera's come with this built in feature. :)

Sorry - you must start a new thread for a new question, lest this one goes off topic. ;)

Did you leave a filter on your Sigma. (I've been known to have accidently done silly things like that, leaving CPL's on and stuff for night photography before. ;-)a.

Ah i see! So there's no way to get rid of them unless you're in post processing?

and yeah true, that is a different subject... & no, no filter. I'll mess around with it again some night and check back if it gives have any more issues




  
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RED hot pixels
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