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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 15 Jan 2014 (Wednesday) 17:05
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3 ESSENTIAL MARKETING TACTICS FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS

 
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grahamclarkphoto
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Jan 15, 2014 21:11 |  #16

jecottrell wrote in post #16609202 (external link)
How do you deal with the customer that has received the free products and the person that has been referred having to pay? Won't the next person expect the same as the first?

You have Services and Products. The Services have a subjective value, it corresponds to your skill and the value you deliver. The Products are often times prints, and the prospect and/or customer know's the real value of it, therefore this is a bad leverage point.

The Service you provide however is again, subjective in terms of cost. Therefore you stand to gain the most leverage by charging more for the Services and giving away the Products (which cost you nothing) to get more customers that consume the Services.

There's also a justice mechanism at play here. Humans don't want to feel like they're being taken advantage of, and giving things away often elicits this emotion. It's a normal human emotion but you have to get rid of it as it's not part of the equation of selling things to humans.

If your price point of a normal shoot is $75 increase your price to $97 and "consume" the prints you give away.

As mentioned before, if you print 20x 4x6 prints at Nations Photo Lab you're really only spending $7.26 USD. But the perceived value form the customers perspective is much higher. That's where you gain real leverage.


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grahamclarkphoto
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Jan 15, 2014 21:21 |  #17

proimages wrote in post #16609200 (external link)
I'm open to ideas!! Like to offer limited editions
Canvas, Fine art paper
16 x 24
24 x 36
30 x 45

Unlimited editions: (lower cost)
pro lab prints(maybe not), Metal
8 x 12
11 x 17
16 x 24

Also have some panoramic images and giga pixels..trying to not complicate site and goals at this time. Don't want to stock too much stuff..working on some prices from my local sources. I have some custom frames to offer..

Planning to release six collections and six images each as first round.
36 images

My site is almost ready, my big question of the day..
I have store.(mysite).com for a shopping cart connected to the gallery site.
They are on same .dot com anyone see issues having a dedicated cart?
kinda a hack over a paid service..

Setting up all these options is a project. Great topic!
Nice to have some feedback!

cheers
Darrin

Hey Darrin,

I think simplicity is really the key to achieving a high conversion. Having only three sizes is great, but I'd recommend only selling limited editions as opposed to open editions or both. As it turns out, Scarcity is a powerful mental trigger that is part of human nature and if you can use that to your advantage you stand to gain huge leverage.

If there's less of something humans want more of it. If there's nothing of something humans want even more of it.

Create small editions and have a certificate that guarantees the edition scarcity. This forces the scarcity to be real. Otherwise it's a vacuous thing that people don't believe. The perceived value becomes much higher as a result of lower editions.

Canvas is an interesting medium, and in my opinion is sort of a fad. The reason I say that is because it's not archival in nature and you don't see professional galleries selling Canvas prints for this reason. The resolution is also much lower, so it's more forgiving of lower quality.

The mediums to really focus on are the mediums that galleries are using, and that consumers respond to:

- Traditional framing
- Plexiglass mounted images with taped seams (to prevent oxidization)
- Wood frame-mounted resin prints (handmade)

If you offer something that's not archival the perceived value is lower simply by not having the "archival guarantee" on the print. It increases the perceived value, not the intrinsic value.

As for selling goods online through your website, I'd recommend woocommerce (external link). It integrates with WordPress and allows you to sell physical or virtual goods through your site. It's pretty straightforward.


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Jan 15, 2014 21:46 |  #18

grahamclarkphoto wrote in post #16609225 (external link)
Hey Darrin,

I think simplicity is really the key to achieving a high conversion. Having only three sizes is great, but I'd recommend only selling limited editions as opposed to open editions or both. As it turns out, Scarcity is a powerful mental trigger that is part of human nature and if you can use that to your advantage you stand to gain huge leverage.

I tend to agree across the board..three sizes for fine art even one or two..seems best
but verticals, panorama's really toss that up. Say In your recommendation a single 20" x 60" metal..would be great to show just more than I can afford.

I've done a few shows and was told..
1. My work needed to be in more high end galleries (hard)
2. Sales went to lower priced goods..(type of show)

I did want to have some affordable stuff The box of matted prints.
$200 - $300 range seems to put people off. As for perceptions I'm here to learn.
Love to try your example...

Maybe the answer is to have specific collections for type of show, gallery your presenting in?

Trying to lock down prices this week and will share..open to suggestions leaning to 3x cost range. I'd like to move some art for a couple years then raise prices. I have a massive archive of work.
cheers
Darrin


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Jan 15, 2014 21:50 |  #19

proimages wrote in post #16609285 (external link)
I tend to agree across the board..three sizes for fine art even one or two..seems best
but verticals, panorama's really toss that up. Say In your recommendation a single 20" x 60" metal..would be great to show just more than I can afford.

I've done a few shows and was told..
1. My work needed to be in more high end galleries (hard)
2. Sales went to lower priced goods..(type of show)

I did want to have some affordable stuff The box of matted prints.
$200 - $300 range seems to put people off. As for perceptions I'm here to learn.
Love to try your example...

Maybe the answer is to have specific collections for type of show, gallery your presenting in?

Trying to lock down prices this week and will share..open to suggestions leaning to 3x cost range. I'd like to move some art for a couple years then raise prices. I have a massive archive of work.
cheers
Darrin

What about not displaying any matted artwork? The problem with matted work is that it gives the prospect a very good reason not to buy the image you're optimizing for.

What I like about 16x24, 24x36 and 40x60 is that a vertical 16x24 is exactly the same height as a 24x36 - 24" on each side.

The sizes should always be roughly double the previous or it creates a math problem inside the prospects mind.

If you offer an epic size print that's so huge and expensive that no one can afford it and you optimize the process for your 16x24, you're more likely to sell it as opposed to selling only matted prints with 16x24's.


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Jan 15, 2014 21:52 |  #20

proimages wrote in post #16609285 (external link)
I tend to agree across the board..three sizes for fine art even one or two..seems best
but verticals, panorama's really toss that up. Say In your recommendation a single 20" x 60" metal..would be great to show just more than I can afford.

I've done a few shows and was told..
1. My work needed to be in more high end galleries (hard)
2. Sales went to lower priced goods..(type of show)

I did want to have some affordable stuff The box of matted prints.
$200 - $300 range seems to put people off. As for perceptions I'm here to learn.
Love to try your example...

Maybe the answer is to have specific collections for type of show, gallery your presenting in?

Trying to lock down prices this week and will share..open to suggestions leaning to 3x cost range. I'd like to move some art for a couple years then raise prices. I have a massive archive of work.
cheers
Darrin

This is of course assuming that the work is of professional quality. Unless the craft is incredibly high none of this stuff will work.


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Jan 15, 2014 22:42 |  #21

grahamclarkphoto wrote in post #16609294 (external link)
This is of course assuming that the work is of professional quality. Unless the craft is incredibly high none of this stuff will work.

My work is constantly improving, selling and displaying is an area I need to work on! The new site is still very rough, open to early feedback. Working on 'buy now' call to action stuff..beta.darrinnupu​f.com

Finished copyrights last year and ready to move forward with the art prints This year. The main goal is to separate my nudes and landscapes into different sites.

Been debating showing anything about my photography services, printing, video and motion control on the fine art site??
Thanks for any feedback!


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Jan 15, 2014 23:08 |  #22

Graham - say you have a booth at an art walk/art fair - how many total different prints would you recommend displaying for sale?


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Jan 16, 2014 00:18 |  #23

proimages wrote in post #16609397 (external link)
My work is constantly improving, selling and displaying is an area I need to work on! The new site is still very rough, open to early feedback. Working on 'buy now' call to action stuff..beta.darrinnupu​f.com

Finished copyrights last year and ready to move forward with the art prints This year. The main goal is to separate my nudes and landscapes into different sites.

Been debating showing anything about my photography services, printing, video and motion control on the fine art site??
Thanks for any feedback!

The goal is to be seen as an authority by the prospect, and if you dilute your site with too many services or products the customer will feel less trust.

I would start simple and move more complex as you test.


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Jan 16, 2014 00:21 |  #24

Andrushka wrote in post #16609462 (external link)
Graham - say you have a booth at an art walk/art fair - how many total different prints would you recommend displaying for sale?

I've shown at a few white-tent street fairs in Seattle and in my experience selling too many different sizes is not a good idea, and selling matted clear-wrap prints is also bad. And that's common among artists to do that, so don't do it.

If the prospect wants something and they see two options they'll go for the cheaper one because there's less of a monetary commitment. They often rationalize it by thinking they'll eventually get a bigger one but they of course never do.

Sell 24x36 sized prints at very high price points, too high so people don't buy them. Then optimize and sell for the 16x24.

If you must have a third, smaller print size than the 16x24, either price it very very low so they sell and replace them with red stickers to indicate social proof, or price them very close to the 16x24 so as to provide better perceived value on the 16x24's (if that's the one you want to optimize for).


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Jan 16, 2014 02:35 |  #25

grahamclarkphoto wrote in post #16609562 (external link)
I've shown at a few white-tent street fairs in Seattle and in my experience selling too many different sizes is not a good idea, and selling matted clear-wrap prints is also bad. And that's common among artists to do that, so don't do it.

If the prospect wants something and they see two options they'll go for the cheaper one because there's less of a monetary commitment. They often rationalize it by thinking they'll eventually get a bigger one but they of course never do.

Sell 24x36 sized prints at very high price points, too high so people don't buy them. Then optimize and sell for the 16x24.

If you must have a third, smaller print size than the 16x24, either price it very very low so they sell and replace them with red stickers to indicate social proof, or price them very close to the 16x24 so as to provide better perceived value on the 16x24's (if that's the one you want to optimize for).

Thats solid info right there, I appreciate that!

Ok but say I have 18 distinct pieces (my current real life example (external link)) - in 2 sizes each - is that too many? (or too few?)


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Jan 16, 2014 04:55 |  #26

grahamclarkphoto wrote in post #16609181 (external link)
In portrait photography your success is often determined by attracting clients and doing shoots for money, in exchange for services and potentially selling prints to, right?

If so, one of the best things you can do to gain massive leverage is give away prints for free. It's also one of the most unintuitive things - giving things away.

So instead of charging for the prints give away up to twenty for free - without watermarks or anything to identify you to your brand or website.

Once you deliver the prints to the customer you've provided tangible value. Tell them that you rely on their referrals for your business. Because you've given them something that they identify with real value (real money) they're more likely to give you something in return - business. In behavioral psychology it's called reciprocity. It's one of the most powerful mental triggers to understand and use to your advantage.

Below is a video by a renowned behavior psychologist speaking about the power of reciprocity. Skip to minute 9:00.

https://app.box.com/s/​rdcgfdf5924ibc2vqe4q (external link) (300MB+)

Thanks for the video link. I will watch it when it's done downloading. :)
I recently sent my clients from 2013 a photo magnet for free. I included referral cards with the hopes of capitalizing WOM advertising. Is that in the right direction?

Edit: Just watched the video. It was great! Very eye opening for someone who doesn't have any background in sales/marketing. I guess now I owe you. ;)


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Jan 16, 2014 10:04 |  #27

Andrushka wrote in post #16609664 (external link)
Thats solid info right there, I appreciate that!

Ok but say I have 18 distinct pieces (my current real life example (external link)) - in 2 sizes each - is that too many? (or too few?)

Because your images have a 1:1 aspect ratio having more quantities of only one to possibly two sizes might work best.

But ideally you track which are your best sellers and optimize for those.

Try printing 6x6 Lustre prints mounted to styrene and make a hanger for the back. All said and done it would cost around $7.13 and you could sell them for $45 - $55.

As an upsell you could also sell 8x8 Plexi mounted metallic prints signed in limited editions of 7 for $147. Only best sellers would be printed this way


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Jan 16, 2014 10:11 |  #28

NewCreation wrote in post #16609750 (external link)
Thanks for the video link. I will watch it when it's done downloading. :)
I recently sent my clients from 2013 a photo magnet for free. I included referral cards with the hopes of capitalizing WOM advertising. Is that in the right direction?

Edit: Just watched the video. It was great! Very eye opening for someone who doesn't have any background in sales/marketing. I guess now I owe you. ;)

The photo magnet is a great idea. Ideally the photo magnet and referral cards direct the customer or prospect to a custom URL (www.website.com/2014 (external link)) so you can track how many direct hits you're getting on both of those. If they go to a standard domain URL it's nearly impossible to measure conversion.

There are services designed for wedding photographers that automate the sending of image postcards. For example you could automate three a year - Christmas, Easter and Thanksgiving. You add the addresses and images and the rest is done for you! :)


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Jan 16, 2014 15:46 |  #29

grahamclarkphoto wrote in post #16608727 (external link)
I wanted to share with you a few tactics that I've used to successfully sell photographs in galleries. These tactics can be used separately but they're meant to be integrated into one overall strategy.

...since adopting these tactics: what percentage increase in sales did you experience? You considered yourself "unsuccessful" for a long while. Do you consider yourself successful now?


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Jan 16, 2014 17:43 |  #30

banquetbear wrote in post #16611058 (external link)
...since adopting these tactics: what percentage increase in sales did you experience? You considered yourself "unsuccessful" for a long while. Do you consider yourself successful now?

I sell many more prints now than I did previous to understanding this stuff. For example, last week I sold 3x 24x36 prints, and this past monday I sold 13x prints to a company in Seattle who wanted artwork for their office. They saw the work in the SF gallery, didn't buy from the gallery but instead reached out separately (gallery commission still applies of course), so I'm seeing a much stronger 'halo effect' as well.

I do want to mention however that these tactics are always going to be changing, but the underlying human behavior that they trigger, will not. In fact that will always remain the same, so really getting under the surface of the tactics is where we want to be.


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