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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 14 Jan 2014 (Tuesday) 05:54
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markisclueless
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Jan 15, 2014 14:11 |  #16

Sirrith wrote in post #16607216 (external link)
I don't think I saw this in the replies above, so a small tip specific to the 10-22 at around 10-12mm:
To get virtually everything in focus, set the aperture to f11 or f13 (or f16 if you have something REALLY close to the camera and something REALLY far away), then turn the MF ring so that the marker on the distance scale is just between the last number (I think it was 1m?) and the horizontal "L" shaped line that is in front of the infinity symbol.

Thanks Tom - images were much sharper at f13 that and f18 - appreciate the advice


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Eddie
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Jan 15, 2014 14:15 |  #17

GoHokiesGo wrote in post #16607318 (external link)
I learned something great from this thread to start practicing on my landscapes too- Great info!

There are apps for both android and ios for dof calculations. I have one on my Samsung called dof master. Takes literally seconds to dial in the focal length and aperture to get the relevant info. handy when you are out and about


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markisclueless
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Jan 16, 2014 00:02 |  #18

xpfloyd wrote in post #16608263 (external link)
There are apps for both android and ios for dof calculations. I have one on my Samsung called dof master. Takes literally seconds to dial in the focal length and aperture to get the relevant info. handy when you are out and about

I have Samsung S4 so will download this app as well - thanks


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Jan 16, 2014 04:57 |  #19

markisclueless wrote in post #16609532 (external link)
I have Samsung S4 so will download this app as well - thanks

Just realised its actually called dof calculator not dof master. Here is a screen shot of the one I use. Just remember to change it from 35mm at the top to crop if your using a crop body -


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markisclueless
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Jan 16, 2014 23:46 |  #20

Thanks Eddie


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Snydremark
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Jan 17, 2014 00:43 as a reply to  @ markisclueless's post |  #21

Great stuff here; I want to address one of your initial questions that I didn't see addressed, exactly. Don't use Spot AF when shooting a subject that isn't obscured by other things.

The AF system needs to have contrast to focus, and using spot focus reduces the area of the AF sensor used to detect that focus. This works well to pick a subject out of a tree or something, but reduces the camera's ability to lock focus on an unobstructed subject.


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markisclueless
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Jan 17, 2014 05:10 |  #22

Snydremark wrote in post #16612242 (external link)
Great stuff here; I want to address one of your initial questions that I didn't see addressed, exactly. Don't use Spot AF when shooting a subject that isn't obscured by other things.

The AF system needs to have contrast to focus, and using spot focus reduces the area of the AF sensor used to detect that focus. This works well to pick a subject out of a tree or something, but reduces the camera's ability to lock focus on an unobstructed subject.

Thanks Eric, I am shooting in manual focus now with better results.


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markisclueless
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Jan 17, 2014 05:14 |  #23

Another newby question, how to I prevent sun flare when shooting during a setting sun?
I had a nice location (at least to my eye) with a rock in foreground and a rock +- 10 feet behind and to the right - I had the sun setting between these rocks so the rocks kinda leads your eye into the frame. Problem is I got sun flare in all shots except for when the sun was almost gone and the colours were not as vibrant in these ?
Have a feeling it has to do with use of filters etc (next learning step) ?


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Lowner
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Jan 17, 2014 05:34 |  #24

markisclueless wrote in post #16612494 (external link)
Another newby question, how to I prevent sun flare when shooting during a setting sun?

You cannot, the sun, if in shot, will always show glare. Filters only make the problem worse, because its yet more glass.


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Jan 17, 2014 05:36 |  #25

Some lenses have better flare control than others but like Richard says it cant be prevented fully. Lens hoods can help. Embrace the flare is what I say though :)


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Jan 17, 2014 05:41 as a reply to  @ Eddie's post |  #26

http://digital-photography-school.com/how-to-prevent-lens-flare (external link)


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Jan 17, 2014 05:42 |  #27

markisclueless wrote in post #16612494 (external link)
Problem is I got sun flare in all shots except for when the sun was almost gone and the colours were not as vibrant in these ?
Have a feeling it has to do with use of filters etc (next learning step) ?

Bright sunlight can cause flat contrast, especially if shooting landscapes in the middle of the day when the sun is high. when shooting sunsets or sunrises I always use a graduated ND filter (either soft edge or hard edge). My filters are 3 stop so they cut out 3 stops of light from the sky to allow the foreground to be exposed brighter. They dont help with flare but allow contrast and exposure to be brought back. I have recently purchased a 3 stop reverse grad ND filter which darkens the horizon where the sun is but effects the sky less than the GND but havent had a chance to give it a try yet due to the weather.

Filters can be expensive depending on the brand. Most people start with the cheap ones and after wasting money buying and selling end up with something better like a Lee setup (me included, started with Cokin filters that had a horrible colour cast) If you go down that road expext to pay out the same amount you would for a lens to get the full "kit". I use a big stopper, square CPL, 3 stop hard GND, 3 stop soft GND and a 3 stop reverse GND (Hitech) which adds to over £600


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markisclueless
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Jan 17, 2014 06:19 |  #28

xpfloyd wrote in post #16612527 (external link)
Bright sunlight can cause flat contrast, especially if shooting landscapes in the middle of the day when the sun is high. when shooting sunsets or sunrises I always use a graduated ND filter (either soft edge or hard edge). My filters are 3 stop so they cut out 3 stops of light from the sky to allow the foreground to be exposed brighter. They dont help with flare but allow contrast and exposure to be brought back. I have recently purchased a 3 stop reverse grad ND filter which darkens the horizon where the sun is but effects the sky less than the GND but havent had a chance to give it a try yet due to the weather.

Filters can be expensive depending on the brand. Most people start with the cheap ones and after wasting money buying and selling end up with something better like a Lee setup (me included, started with Cokin filters that had a horrible colour cast) If you go down that road expext to pay out the same amount you would for a lens to get the full "kit". I use a big stopper, square CPL, 3 stop hard GND, 3 stop soft GND and a 3 stop reverse GND (Hitech) which adds to over £600

Thanks for detailed feedback - all I can hear is the bank breaking! Time to do some research! thanks


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Jan 17, 2014 06:28 as a reply to  @ markisclueless's post |  #29

If you want to make a cheap start with ND Filters, i own a Haida 10-stop which i chose after doing a lot of research, they are comparable to Lee and B+W, at a much cheaper price :)
Sometimes it's good to buy cheap just to see if that's what you want to do rather than shell out a fortune.


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Jan 17, 2014 09:53 |  #30

For a cheap start at long exposure ND filters you can use welding glass. It costs almost nothing and is attached to the lens with rubber bands. Depending on the glass depends on how many stops of light it cuts out but many people use it as a 10 stop filter. If you search on here and on flickr there is a group and a thread with people using this to with surprisingly good results. Colour cast is the main problem but I believe this can be removed in lightroom. Its just harder to fully remove with things like welding glass.

EDIT - flickr here - http://www.flickr.com …s/weldingmaskgl​assfilter/ (external link)
and the POTN thread - https://photography-on-the.net …2&highlight=wel​ding+glass


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