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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 14 Jan 2014 (Tuesday) 05:54
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StayFrosty
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Jan 18, 2014 02:07 |  #31

In addition to using filters as mentioned above, if the sun is just out of frame you can shade the lens, with a lens hood or just shadow the lens with your hand, this will improve contrast and help reduce flare.

Alternatively when the sun is in frame you could do several exposures and blend them together in Photoshop. ( i.e. if you under expose the sky the sun will glow/flare less)


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markisclueless
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Jan 19, 2014 09:28 |  #32

Thanks all for your helpful comments - loads of great advice that I will put to the test


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markisclueless
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Jan 27, 2014 12:59 |  #33

I am happy to report that my landscape shots over the weekend improved dramatically due to the advise received in this thread - THANKS
I could not resist and bought a Hoya NDx400 filter for my 10-22mm, now I need to work on my exposures.
I have read the various threads, saying I need to expose for the shot without ND filter, then put the filter on and the step back the SS to compensate for darkness.
So, for example my shot was as follows without ND filter:
20mm
ISO 100
F11
SS 1/125

What would I change to compensate for the loss in F stops (I obviously want ISO as low as possible and F11 - F13) ?

thanks


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Eddie
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Jan 27, 2014 15:49 |  #34

markisclueless wrote in post #16641492 (external link)
I am happy to report that my landscape shots over the weekend improved dramatically due to the advise received in this thread - THANKS
I could not resist and bought a Hoya NDx400 filter for my 10-22mm, now I need to work on my exposures.
I have read the various threads, saying I need to expose for the shot without ND filter, then put the filter on and the step back the SS to compensate for darkness.
So, for example my shot was as follows without ND filter:
20mm
ISO 100
F11
SS 1/125

What would I change to compensate for the loss in F stops (I obviously want ISO as low as possible and F11 - F13) ?

thanks

Try and keep your ISO and f stop the same and increase your shutter speed by the number of stops your filter is. Once you go past 30 seconds you will need to switch to bulb mode and use a shutter release. So if you set your dial on your camera to be 1/3 stop increments then 3 clicks on the shutter speed dial is one stop. If you haves 10 stop nd filter click it 30 times etc. (Or click it as many stops as you can until you reach 30 secs and then do the calculation in your head for the remaining stops and use bulb mode)

Edit - I just googled your filter and saw it is a 9 stop filter so 27 clicks of the dial. For your example above 1/125 becomes 64 seconds (1/125 doubled 9 times). A bit of trial and error will tell you if it is 9 stops or not (my big stopper is 11 stops)


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markisclueless
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Jan 27, 2014 23:52 |  #35

xpfloyd wrote in post #16641967 (external link)
Try and keep your ISO and f stop the same and increase your shutter speed by the number of stops your filter is. Once you go past 30 seconds you will need to switch to bulb mode and use a shutter release. So if you set your dial on your camera to be 1/3 stop increments then 3 clicks on the shutter speed dial is one stop. If you haves 10 stop nd filter click it 30 times etc. (Or click it as many stops as you can until you reach 30 secs and then do the calculation in your head for the remaining stops and use bulb mode)

Edit - I just googled your filter and saw it is a 9 stop filter so 27 clicks of the dial. For your example above 1/125 becomes 64 seconds (1/125 doubled 9 times). A bit of trial and error will tell you if it is 9 stops or not (my big stopper is 11 stops)

Awesome - thanks a million - your explanations are always so detailed


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Eddie
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Jan 29, 2014 04:10 |  #36

No probs. One more thing is that sometimes keeping your ISO low and your aperture where you want it for dof ends up giving you a very long shutter speed when you apply the 9 stop filter (i.e. a 2 second shot becomes a 1024 second shot). At this point you would make the decision to stand around for 17 minutes or increase your ISO a bit (or open your aperture). Generally I dont mind standing for 8-10 mins when doing night photography to keep the ISO low and minimize noise but any longer than that and I normally get bored and/or cold. Same would apply for long exposure ND shots


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Phrasikleia
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Jan 29, 2014 08:15 |  #37

xpfloyd wrote in post #16641967 (external link)
Try and keep your ISO and f stop the same and increase your shutter speed by the number of stops your filter is. Once you go past 30 seconds you will need to switch to bulb mode and use a shutter release. So if you set your dial on your camera to be 1/3 stop increments then 3 clicks on the shutter speed dial is one stop. If you haves 10 stop nd filter click it 30 times etc. (Or click it as many stops as you can until you reach 30 secs and then do the calculation in your head for the remaining stops and use bulb mode)

Edit - I just googled your filter and saw it is a 9 stop filter so 27 clicks of the dial. For your example above 1/125 becomes 64 seconds (1/125 doubled 9 times). A bit of trial and error will tell you if it is 9 stops or not (my big stopper is 11 stops)

Or you can just use one of the many mobile apps that calculate the new exposure for you and provide a timer if that exposure exceeds 30 seconds. Very handy!


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Eddie
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Jan 29, 2014 09:02 |  #38

Phrasikleia wrote in post #16646652 (external link)
Or you can just use one of the many mobile apps that calculate the new exposure for you and provide a timer if that exposure exceeds 30 seconds. Very handy!

good point! I use a phone app for dof tables but never thought of using a phone app for this - doh!


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markisclueless
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Jan 29, 2014 09:57 |  #39

xpfloyd wrote in post #16646774 (external link)
good point! I use a phone app for dof tables but never thought of using a phone app for this - doh!

That sounds like a plan! thanks


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Jan 30, 2014 02:06 as a reply to  @ markisclueless's post |  #40

A note on flare when the sun is in the frame. Sometimes relatively small changes in composition can make dramatic differences to the flare, particularly with wide angle lenses. So although you may not be able to get rid of it, you can sometimes minimize it, or put it somewhere where you can clone/heal it out but adjusting the composition slightly.

Sounds like with the rocks you just didn't have a choice. Flare was one of the main reasons I replaced my 18-55 kit with a 17-40 and then got the 10-22 instead of the cheaper options.


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Phrasikleia
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Jan 30, 2014 10:05 |  #41

ejenner wrote in post #16649171 (external link)
A note on flare when the sun is in the frame. Sometimes relatively small changes in composition can make dramatic differences to the flare, particularly with wide angle lenses. So although you may not be able to get rid of it, you can sometimes minimize it, or put it somewhere where you can clone/heal it out but adjusting the composition slightly.

Sounds like with the rocks you just didn't have a choice. Flare was one of the main reasons I replaced my 18-55 kit with a 17-40 and then got the 10-22 instead of the cheaper options.

Better still, just use the finger trick to prevent flare entirely. Then you can compose however you like, with the sun as much in the frame as you like. While you're shooting, include a shot with your finger blocking the sun from the camera. That will give you one frame with no flare at all that you can layer over the main shot wherever flare is appearing.


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Jan 30, 2014 10:18 |  #42

xpfloyd wrote in post #16612518 (external link)
Some lenses have better flare control than others but like Richard says it cant be prevented fully. Lens hoods can help. Embrace the flare is what I say though :)

I use the Flare Buster to remedy that. Gone are the days of using my hand or a hat! :)

http://www.flarebuster​.com (external link)




  
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Phrasikleia
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Jan 30, 2014 10:43 |  #43

jdizzle wrote in post #16649864 (external link)
I use the Flare Buster to remedy that. Gone are the days of using my hand or a hat! :)

http://www.flarebuster​.com (external link)

How can that possibly work when the sun is actually IN the frame (which is the scenario under discussion here)?


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Jan 30, 2014 14:52 |  #44

I realize this is a question that comes out of ignorance so my apologies in advance.

When using a film SLR, manual focusing was easy: it had a split focus circle in the focus screen. I was younger then and had no issues with it whatsoever.

I'm now 60 and am now wearing glasses so I worry about manual focus. Exactly how does one focus to infinity on a DSLR? Through the view finder? Using the infinity sign on the little focus window on the lens itself?

As I said, I know this is an ignorant question but I'm not following along. I guess I trust the auto focus more than I do my own eyes.... so that's also part of the problem.


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Phrasikleia
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Jan 30, 2014 15:06 |  #45

Phoenixkh wrote in post #16650614 (external link)
I realize this is a question that comes out of ignorance so my apologies in advance.

When using a film SLR, manual focusing was easy: it had a split focus circle in the focus screen. I was younger then and had no issues with it whatsoever.

I'm now 60 and am now wearing glasses so I worry about manual focus. Exactly how does one focus to infinity on a DSLR? Through the view finder? Using the infinity sign on the little focus window on the lens itself?

As I said, I know this is an ignorant question but I'm not following along. I guess I trust the auto focus more than I do my own eyes.... so that's also part of the problem.

I typically use Live View and zoom in 10x wherever I want to focus. I also sometimes just go by the markings on the lens, especially when I'm focus bracketing. It's important to test just how accurate the infinity marking is on any recent model of lens because the markings these days aren't what they used to be.


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