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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 29 Jan 2014 (Wednesday) 13:09
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I am a beginner, and I am stuck!

 
gonzogolf
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Feb 04, 2014 13:10 |  #46

DigitalDon wrote in post #16662579 (external link)
Thanks for the post architect.delhi

I had a waking moment yesterday that I will never forget, All day yesterday I read about perspective, looked at pictures, and a few videos, I guess I did it so much that when I was watching one of those murder shows on the ID channel, All of the perspective, leading lines, vanishing points, thirds, etc. stood out like a sore thumb. On tv things move along so fast that it hard to see leading lines, vanishing points,thirds, etc. but watching the mudrer shows while they are talking they will show about 5 seconds of video of the court house, the streets of the small town etc. and with the pause button I can look at them as long as I like. So now I am going to pay more attention to the shows that has to be re-enacted to tell a story.

Start looking at the lighting ratios and direction and you wont be able to follow the story line for a week or so. In doing so you will realize why a movie set needs to many people. The amount of large fill sources on many outdoor shots is amazing.




  
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Ilovetheleafs
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Feb 04, 2014 13:34 |  #47

Here's something that might help you a bit. Check out DigitalrevTV and Froknowsphotos both are really good learning tools that are found on youtube and both are presented in a fun and silly manner. I actually put those on while I work on my college assignments.

Also why not try picking up street photography, that is generally pretty fun!


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DigitalDon
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Feb 04, 2014 13:34 |  #48

gonzogolf wrote in post #16663130 (external link)
Start looking at the lighting ratios and direction and you wont be able to follow the story line for a week or so. In doing so you will realize why a movie set needs to many people. The amount of large fill sources on many outdoor shots is amazing.

"Start looking at the lighting ratios and direction and you wont be able to follow the story line for a week or so"

Thats where I am now, sure makes it easier getting through the commercials. :D



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Clean ­ Gene
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Feb 08, 2014 00:43 |  #49

SkipD wrote in post #16657336 (external link)
The key to my statement is the fact that some folks recommend simply shooting lots of pictures as a way to learn. Regarding that, I stated that "That, IN ITSELF, cannot do much for the learning process". Simply doing something over and over again does not necessarily make the results better. In order to learn about how to do anything well, one must be cognizant of what he/she is doing and how his/her actions (or lack thereof) affect the outcome of whatever is being done. Then, changes in the process need to be thought about and applied followed by further analysis to determine if the results are improved by the changes in the process.

Ah, I gotcha. In that case, I agree entirely.




  
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Clean ­ Gene
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Feb 09, 2014 01:26 |  #50

OhLook wrote in post #16657920 (external link)
Advice seems to divide into two kinds: the top-down approach (learn the theory first and then apply it) and the bottom-up approach (shoot a lot and consult the theory if necessary). Why such polarization? Does it come only from posters' personalities and their various learning styles?

Heh, this is an interesting thing to think about. So I'll give my feedback on my situation. It might not be helpful to anyone else, but writing down my thoughts may help me (I find that putting things to pen and paper or type often helps me to remember it by cementing it in my mind).

Personally, I think I've been taught BOTH ways simultaneously. The focus was always shooting LOTS of images, but there was an equal emphasis on SIMULTANEOUSLY learning theory and thinking about creative ways to solve problems and push the envelope with independent study. Again, that's how I was TAUGHT. Neither took precedence over the other, they went hand in hand.

In PRACTICE, though, that's not what I do. My personal method is more along the lines of not shooting until I have an idea or a plan.And I spend a buttload of time formulating plans and ideas without shooting. Then when I finally do try applying those ideas and plans to actual shoots, I typically end up throwing them out the window anyway. The shoot either modifies the plan or renders it irrelevant, then I make up a new or modified plan on the fly.

So there's a disconnect between what I've been taught to do, and what I do. That's worth noting, and it's worth thinking about how that's working out for me.

Well, recently a class assignment had us bring in all of our best work from EVER for an informal classroom critique. And that's where I really got to see the comparison. We weren't being graded on the quality of our images, the whole point was to see where we were going with our work. And it was painfully clear. The people with the best work were the ones who shot a LOT. Many of their images were cliches, but they were GOOD cliches and they looked fantastic. And they had a LOT of good work.

By contrast, I had some cool stuff too. In all of the class, my work was probably the strangest and the most controversial and the most interesting (in terms of inviting discussion). But a lot of it was also ROUGH or looking half-finished, because I either started on an idea without enough pre-shooting, or I got some great images and then didn't follow through with them and refine the idea. And the actual VOLUME of my work was embarassing. There was definitely some really cool stuff in my catalogue. My teacher actually publicly said that my M.O. was that I don't show anyone a damn thing and then blow everyone away at the end (which he shouldn't freaking say in such a public setting, but that's another rant entirely). But it's kind of true. I'm just starting to come to accept that I've got serious freaking potential, which is a damn shame when I look over my work and see how LITTLE content I've got to show for it. And being fair to myself, much of it is freaking awesome. But awesome enough to justify such little content? Hell no. The biggest thing I learned when viewing my final images was "damn, there should be a LOT more of this stuff here."

Or to put it another way...several people in the class were actually making money on their photography on a consistent basis. Who were those people? That's right, the ones who shoot a LOT. Some of it was wedding stuff, which I never want to do, but they were actually selling quite a bit of images that were solely things that they shot just for the sake of shooting. Granted, most of it wasn't selling, but they were shooting enough to guarantee that some of their images were marketable to someone. Me? I've never sold a single print. Why? Because I only shoot when I have an idea, and that kind of self-serving attitude sort of entails "shooting only for me". When combined with a limited total output, it's no surprise that (cool images or not) I don't have a whole lot to offer in terms of things that would be of monetary value to someone else.

So, that's how my shooting style influences my outlook. I've been shooting long enough to identify my shooting style, and comparing my style and work to that of my peers provides a point of comparison by which I can determine how well my shooting style is working for me. And through self-reflection I can say this: I'm doing some stuff right, I'm just not doing nearly enough of it. I need to take what I'm doing and then do a lot more of it, because my primary problem is that I don't do nearly enough work.




  
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OhLook
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Feb 09, 2014 10:55 |  #51

Clean Gene, that's an interesting response. (Thank you for showing that at least one person thought seriously about my question.) I do believe that both study and practice are important. When I was a student, the better science courses had two phases: lecture and lab. There was also homework. So we'd listen, and we'd read, and we'd do. Passive and active ways of learning the same material alternated. I think this mixed approach is good at getting something into one's brain.


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architect.delhi
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Feb 09, 2014 11:16 |  #52

Clean Gene wrote in post #16675244 (external link)
So there's a disconnect between what I've been taught to do, and what I do. That's worth noting, and it's worth thinking about how that's working out for me....I'm doing some stuff right, I'm just not doing nearly enough of it. I need to take what I'm doing and then do a lot more of it, because my primary problem is that I don't do nearly enough work.

Clean Gene, maybe you won't believe that your current problem and its description is faced not only by you by many creative professionals (and even architects like me). We do good work, but either we are only half-way through in realising our potential, or we are doing too little of it. The only way to remedy this is to do a lot more work, but unfortunately, we are limited by (a) lack of clients or assignments which allow us to work in this direction, (like in case of architectural work) or plainly (b) having a living to earn doing something else (like in case of photography being just a hobby).


https://www.flickr.com​/photos/siddharthamish​ra/ (external link)

  
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