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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 09 Feb 2014 (Sunday) 08:31
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Some photographers can do wildlife & bird photograph with 70-200mm?

 
5D3ismydream
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Feb 09, 2014 08:31 |  #1
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Some photographers can do wildlife & bird photograph with 70-200mm? Can I do wildlife & bird photograph without 400mm or 600mm focal length, (just 200mm)?




  
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katodog
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Feb 09, 2014 08:44 |  #2

Focal length is only an issue with distance, if you can get close enough anything will work.


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StillCrazy
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Feb 09, 2014 09:05 |  #3

Use what lenses you have, don't worry about not having a super zoom. When you get shots that you like, crop them and resize if necessary. That will appear to bring the subject in closer, and enlarge it as if you had a longer lens. The pixel density of most modern DSLRs will allow for cropping, and still give great results for printing.


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PH68
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Feb 09, 2014 09:33 |  #4

The closer you can get to the bird/wildlife the less range you need.


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Feb 09, 2014 09:33 |  #5

Bird photography in general can be tough but if you shoot in the highest possible resolution you can still get reasonable images by resizing. Same applies to wildlife although t times it isn't quite so critical as the critters are naturally larger. Danger of course can keep you at a respectable distance.

A technique useful for birds, especially at a feeder, is use of a remote. I use a Satechi and clamp my 60D a few feet from a feeder and get stunning images. It uses "radio" and i can be 60 feet away from the camera. Just remember to cover the camera with a plastic bag since birds will perch on your camera.

Don't forget crop factor can help if you are shooting a cropped sensor camera.




  
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TJays
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Feb 09, 2014 09:38 |  #6

You can use whatever lens you wish, the end results will help you decide if you need a longer focal reach.


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Feb 09, 2014 09:44 |  #7

5D3ismydream wrote in post #16675631 (external link)
Some photographers can do wildlife & bird photograph with 70-200mm? Can I do wildlife & bird photograph without 400mm or 600mm focal length, (just 200mm)?

As has been said, distance to the subject is the determining factor.

This was at 200mm (on a crop sensor) from a distance of approx 15 ft, shot through a window in my house, and it still required a crop. If you can be reasonably close to small birds/wildlife at a feeder in a backyard, then 200 can get the job done.

IMAGE: http://ct1co2.smugmug.com/2013-Random-Pics/i-zSKPc4L/0/M/house%20sparrow-M.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://ct1co2.smugmug.​com/2013-Random-Pics/i-zSKPc4L/A  (external link)

If you are trying to shoot birds/wildlife that is going to be at a distance, then yes, then an extender on your 70-200 at minimum will be needed, but may still come up short. This is at 300mm (on a crop sensor), but still required a moderate crop. It was shot at a distance of approx 100yds.
IMAGE: http://ct1co2.smugmug.com/2014-Random-Pics/i-dBJ4n5x/0/M/Whitehead-M.jpg
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JeffreyG
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Feb 09, 2014 09:51 |  #8

If you are good at taxidermy, you can shoot birds with a macro.


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sandpiper
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Feb 09, 2014 10:04 |  #9

5D3ismydream wrote in post #16675631 (external link)
Some photographers can do wildlife & bird photograph with 70-200mm? Can I do wildlife & bird photograph without 400mm or 600mm focal length, (just 200mm)?

Yes, you can, when you are able to get close enough to your subject. I have taken bird pictures with wide angle lenses, because I was so close that I needed a lens that wide. If you visit a seabird colony, you will find many opportunities to take shots, of relatively large birds, from 3 feet away. 200mm will be sufficient for photographing larger birds and animals from a hide near a food or water source, or just near a bird feeder in the garden. The birds where I live are so used to me putting food out for them at my feeder, I can shoot out in the open just a few feet from the feeder with many species, although some are less trusting. The feeder is next to a hedge and has branches placed around it to allow natural looking shots. The birds in a local park, particularly the waterfowl, will often be sufficiently used to human presence that they will allow you quite close. Squirrels are often so used to people that they will come to you hoping to be fed, again they can easily be photographed with a 70-200.

The fact is though, a longer lens will allow you more opportunities. Whilst there are always going to be some situations where you can manage with a shorter lens, there are going to be many more where you need more reach. Whatever length you have, will not be enough at times (and that includes 800mm with teleconverters) but the longer lens you have, the more times you will have enough reach for that skittish bird perched in a tree some distance away.

200mm is too short for most bird photography away from areas where they are relatively trusting, it will work for larger animals more (as they can be further away and still fill enough of the frame) but again expect them to be just too far away much of the time. You can improve the odds by learning how to approach stealthily, or building hides / blinds and wait for them to come near, but in this genre of photography bigger really is better.




  
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DreDaze
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Feb 09, 2014 10:37 |  #10

if you don't already have a 70-200mm, i wouldn't buy one over a longer lens


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peeaanuut
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Feb 09, 2014 10:55 |  #11

It can be done. As an example. Shot this with a 70-200 in Zion. @200mm. But as others have said, if you are buying a lens and its specifically for wildlife and birding, I would start at 400mm.

IMAGE: http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2821/12412819863_310ca0f9e3_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/peeaanuut/12412​819863/  (external link)
IMG_9702 (external link) by peeaanuut (external link), on Flickr

and this at 50mm on a 17-50

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3740/12413202474_f5e6d02bb4_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/peeaanuut/12413​202474/  (external link)
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Feb 09, 2014 13:00 |  #12

You can also improve your situation with a teleconverter.


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treaks
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Feb 09, 2014 13:09 |  #13

Sometime you get lucky:) 70-200 2.8

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3083/3179740298_5f399217e7_b.jpg



  
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Feb 09, 2014 13:11 |  #14

5D3ismydream wrote in post #16675631 (external link)
Some photographers can do wildlife & bird photograph with 70-200mm? Can I do wildlife & bird photograph without 400mm or 600mm focal length, (just 200mm)?

Some photographers can shoot some birds and animals under some conditions with 200mm. The same photographers will be able to shoot more birds and animals under more conditions using longer lenses.


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Feb 09, 2014 13:14 |  #15

StillCrazy wrote in post #16675708 (external link)
Use what lenses you have, don't worry about not having a super zoom. When you get shots that you like, crop them and resize if necessary.

In the bad old days camera manufacturers used to try to make a big thing of the huge values of 'digital zoom' on their products. Users soon realised it was hogwash. It was then and it is now.


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Some photographers can do wildlife & bird photograph with 70-200mm?
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