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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 24 Feb 2014 (Monday) 16:37
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Some rookie questions...

 
Xerxes
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Feb 24, 2014 16:37 |  #1

OK...For sure these are dumb questions.

I just picked up the sigma 18-35 I'm trying to learn the proper operation with a T5i. You can't adjust the focus manually while in autofocus, but you can adjust the focal length anytime from the lens itself, correct? Is there a way to quickly adjust focal length zoom from the camera body like on the Canon S3is?

Is it safe to rest the body and lens on a flat surface for a few days or should the lens be removed and put away after every use?

This is going to be the main walkaround lens. Do you have any recommendations for a compact carrying bag that will snugly fit this combination? Preferably waterproof.

What solid, compact tripod do you recommend for travel?

Also wondering, while playing with the 50mm 1.8, I adjusted focus manually while in AF a couple times, what are the odds that the lens or camera focus motor were damaged?


-thanks in advance,
1kgcoffe




  
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gnome ­ chompski
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Feb 24, 2014 16:43 |  #2

I will touch on a few points:

-the sigma should be full time manual over ride.
-its ok to leave lens attached. That said, I like to pack mine up when I know it wont be in immediate use just to protect against random events.
-I like Induro tripods, but they might be a bit heavy duty for what you are seeking.


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maverick75
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Feb 24, 2014 16:48 |  #3

The 50mm 1.8 is not full time manual override, for some reason it's listed incorrectly as so on many online reviews and youtube videos.

It could be damaged, but as long as it's working right it should be good. If it were me I'd list that information in for sale ad, if you're selling it that is.


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Snydremark
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Feb 24, 2014 16:54 |  #4

So:

You can adjust focus manually while in AF with the Sigma. The HSM motor on that allows for full time manual focus (usually referenced as FTM). Yes, you can zoom at any time, using the zoom ring on the lens only; SLRs do not control zoom from the body. Just remember that modern lenses will require you to refocus after you zoom; they do not maintain focus after changing focal length.

Lenses do not need to be removed for storage. Assuming no children, pets or stupid friends, you could leave the camera/lens combo sitting on the table for years, just fine.

The next two I don't have suggestions for.

As for the 50, if you can still focus with it normally it's fine. Just don't make doing that a habit with that lens; and pay attention to any new lenses as to whether they support FTM or not.

Welcome to a whole, new world with the SLR :)


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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MalVeauX
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Feb 24, 2014 19:33 |  #5

Xerxes wrote in post #16714335 (external link)
OK...For sure these are dumb questions.

I just picked up the sigma 18-35 I'm trying to learn the proper operation with a T5i. You can't adjust the focus manually while in autofocus, but you can adjust the focal length anytime from the lens itself, correct? Is there a way to quickly adjust focal length zoom from the camera body like on the Canon S3is?

Is it safe to rest the body and lens on a flat surface for a few days or should the lens be removed and put away after every use?

This is going to be the main walkaround lens. Do you have any recommendations for a compact carrying bag that will snugly fit this combination? Preferably waterproof.

What solid, compact tripod do you recommend for travel?

Also wondering, while playing with the 50mm 1.8, I adjusted focus manually while in AF a couple times, what are the odds that the lens or camera focus motor were damaged?


-thanks in advance,
1kgcoffe

Heya,

1. Stop thinking like Point & Shoot. This will be the biggest, biggest advice for a life long experience with photography. That means you have to actually learn photography now. Please don't take this as a rude comment, I have no idea of your background experience. But the questions you asked make me think you have little experience with SLR and it makes me think you've only ever used point & shoots or phones with optical/digital zooms that are done via a button--this doesn't exist in SLR lenses, you zoom manually by twisting or pumping depending on design.

2. You should be able to focus manually even while in autofocus. Read your manual that came with the lens to understand how.

3. Yes you can move the focal length at any time. You do this yourself, manually. No dSLR camera will move the lens's focal length for you. This is point & shoot mentality I was speaking of earlier. Buying a $900 lens, I would think you looked into that first. Again, not trying to be rude, just an observation and hopefully a motivator to start researching this equipment and learning photography instead of buying stuff blindly.

4. I recommend this tripod. (external link)

5. As for a bag, look at some thinktank stuff, or just hit up amazon and search for waterproof camera bag. Remember to consider the size of the 18-35mm lens, it's a very big lens for it's focal lengths due to aperture, so you have to measure it out with the camera attached for a good fit.

6. You can leave the lens attached forever and set it on flat surfaces just fine. Taking it on and off often will only introduce dust and other stuff anyways. If you don't have a reason to take off the lens, such as putting on a different lens, I would leave it on and not take it off unless you absolutely had to. You don't have to have a silk foam bed to rest it on every day.

7. The Nifty Fifty doesn't allow safe manual focus while autofocus is enabled. Doing so will possibly damage the gears. You'll know when it breaks, it will not autofocus correctly, if at all, eventually.

Very best,


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melcat
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Feb 25, 2014 03:03 |  #6

Xerxes wrote in post #16714335 (external link)
Is there a way to quickly adjust focal length zoom from the camera body like on the Canon S3is?

The location of the zoom control, on the lens, makes sense if you know how to hold a DSLR. This is the #1 thing I see random strangers doing wrongly. You do not hold a DSLR with a hand on each "shoulder" of the camera. Your left hand should be underneath the body and rear of the lens, palm up. This allows your thumb and one or more fingers to push-pull the zoom and focus rings on the lens. Does the location of the zoom ring make sense now? It is actually always at hand.

(For very long lenses, there's a different grip. But this doesn't apply to the kit zoom.)




  
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oxygen45
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Feb 25, 2014 04:32 |  #7

If you are manually changing focus and have the shutter button set to AF it will automatically readjust focus. To utilise FTM switch to BBF.


Canon 60D ~ Sigma 10-20 | Sigma 17-50 F2.8 OS | Canon 55-250 IS II | Sigma 150-600 C

  
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Snydremark
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Feb 25, 2014 06:07 |  #8

oxygen45 wrote in post #16715596 (external link)
If you are manually changing focus and have the shutter button set to AF it will automatically readjust focus. To utilise FTM switch to BBF.

FTM works fine without adding BBF into the mix, you just use it after you've achieved your focus with the half-press of the shutter button. The poor guy's gonna have enough to work on to start without throwing another acronym at him.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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oxygen45
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Feb 25, 2014 06:11 |  #9

Snydremark wrote in post #16715670 (external link)
FTM works fine without adding BBF into the mix, you just use it after you've achieved your focus with the half-press of the shutter button. The poor guy's gonna have enough to work on to start without throwing another acronym at him.

Yes, just found BBF a lot easier. Suspect you are right on with your second sentence there.


Canon 60D ~ Sigma 10-20 | Sigma 17-50 F2.8 OS | Canon 55-250 IS II | Sigma 150-600 C

  
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Xerxes
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Feb 25, 2014 10:15 as a reply to  @ oxygen45's post |  #10

Thanks for all the responses. How do you guys feel about side grip straps or is it better to use the standard left hand underneath?

MalVeauX wrote in post #16714780 (external link)
Heya,

1. Stop thinking like Point & Shoot. This will be the biggest, biggest advice for a life long experience with photography. That means you have to actually learn photography now. Please don't take this as a rude comment, I have no idea of your background experience. But the questions you asked make me think you have little experience with SLR and it makes me think you've only ever used point & shoots or phones with optical/digital zooms that are done via a button--this doesn't exist in SLR lenses, you zoom manually by twisting or pumping depending on design.

No offense taken. My previous camera was a canon S3is left 100% in auto mode- an slr used as a point and shoot. Photography is all I have been thinking about 24/7 for the last week since getting the 700D and seeing what can be done.




  
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Phototeacher
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Feb 25, 2014 10:51 |  #11

You need to support the camera/lens with your left hand while you use your right hand for support and to fire the shutter. For best support of the camera/lens, your left hand should be positioned to hold the lens from underneath this way you are ready to adjust the zoom control ring while also holding onto the equipment. In other words, if you let go with your right hand, the left should be cradling the lens. Don't hold the lens with your hand over the top of it; there is not enough support that way. This becomes more important as you zoom out to telephoto, where camera shake will be more magnified.

Xerxes wrote in post #16716224 (external link)
Thanks for all the responses. How do you guys feel about side grip straps or is it better to use the standard left hand underneath?

No offense taken. My previous camera was a canon S3is left 100% in auto mode- an slr used as a point and shoot. Photography is all I have been thinking about 24/7 for the last week since getting the 700D and seeing what can be done.




  
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JeffreyG
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Feb 25, 2014 13:28 |  #12

I have a Gitzo Traveler carbon fiber tripod that I like for travel. It's a reasonable combination of cost, low weight and stability in a tripod with decent height in my opinion.


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I use a Canon 5DIII and a Sony A7rIII

  
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Snydremark
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Feb 25, 2014 13:35 |  #13

Xerxes wrote in post #16716224 (external link)
Thanks for all the responses. How do you guys feel about side grip straps or is it better to use the standard left hand underneath?...

Even when using a hand strap you still want to have your supporting hand under the lens. That grip is a key part of your body positioning for holding the camera steady and avoiding camera shake. The form and weight distribution of an SLR makes that area near the lens mount your primary point of balance; the farther you get from that point the harder it is to hold the camera up properly.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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