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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 26 Feb 2014 (Wednesday) 16:50
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B&W In Camera?

 
Ruggo
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Feb 28, 2014 16:48 |  #16

tonylong wrote in post #16722895 (external link)
To the OP, you say you shoot Raw, have you ever tested this out for yourself? Take your camera and set it to shoot monochrome/B&W, take a shot(s), what do you get?

If you look at the LCD preview, you will see the B&W image. This is because the camera creates and stores a jpeg in the Raw file, using the in-camera settings, so that it and the histogram can be viewed and evaluated.

Then download and open the Raw file in your Raw processor. What do you see?

If you use the Canon Raw processor DPP, you will see virtually the same B&W rendering that you saw in the camera LCD, as a "starting point" in your Raw processing (all those settings can be changed with Raw in DPP).

If you use another Raw processor then you will not see a B&W/monochrome image, except for the very start of when the image first shows up in your software. In that case your software may show the embedded jpeg while it is rendering the Raw data into an RGB image. Then, quickly, the Raw/RGB rendering should show, and lo, it will be the "standard" rendering that your software applies to all your Raw images, full color but ready and waiting for your creative efforts!

Please try it out and get back to us with your results and if you have any questions...otherwise we are wasting bandwidth by repeating the same stuff over and over again!

This ^^^. I shoot in B&W raw in camera so I can see roughly how the picture will look in B&W.




  
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Feb 28, 2014 17:14 |  #17

I will say one thing about shooting in B&W. Before I switched to digital I was into Ansel Adams and the zone system. I had a 4 by 5 field camera and all the B+W colour filters - red, yellow, green, etc. It just happens those filters fit my lens the year I went digital. I did shoot in B&W and those filters just happened to fit my lens. I have to say 9 years ago there was nothing like the actual colour filter on the end of the lens compared to converting it later. Digital filters are very good but I did not think it was near the same thing as the real thing.

Of course tech has leap frogged since then. Personally I shoot in colour and see what I can do with it in B&W at home. Actually I don't want to know. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Since giving up the darkroom it is the only bit of mystery left in the instant feedback digital world. Kinda like being in the darkroom and watching the print appear before your eyes.


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TooManyShots
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Feb 28, 2014 21:49 |  #18
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Shoot it in color because many BW conversion programs would need to read off the colors in order to apply the proper color filters. I generally shoot the real deal, BW film...hehehe...:)


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TooManyShots
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Feb 28, 2014 21:54 |  #19
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digital paradise wrote in post #16725117 (external link)
I will say one thing about shooting in B&W. Before I switched to digital I was into Ansel Adams and the zone system. I had a 4 by 5 field camera and all the B+W colour filters - red, yellow, green, etc. It just happens those filters fit my lens the year I went digital. I did shoot in B&W and those filters just happened to fit my lens. I have to say 9 years ago there was nothing like the actual colour filter on the end of the lens compared to converting it later. Digital filters are very good but I did not think it was near the same thing as the real thing.

Of course tech has leap frogged since then. Personally I shoot in colour and see what I can do with it in B&W at home. Actually I don't want to know. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Since giving up the darkroom it is the only bit of mystery left in the instant feedback digital world. Kinda like being in the darkroom and watching the print appear before your eyes.


Digital BW can never replace BW film. Digital BW fails in the high light miserably. White puffy clouds would never look white enough. A bright sunny scene would never be able to convey that bright illumination (or the glow effect).


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Feb 28, 2014 22:17 |  #20

TooManyShots wrote in post #16725563 (external link)
Digital BW can never replace BW film. Digital BW fails in the high light miserably. White puffy clouds would never look white enough. A bright sunny scene would never be able to convey that bright illumination (or the glow effect).

I would agree with that. Film was always far more forgiving in many areas. I've seen seen amazing B&W digital work but when you walk into a B&W film gallery especially photogs working in 8 by 10 and maintaining the old craft it is jaw dropping.


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tkbslc
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Feb 28, 2014 22:29 |  #21

I like desaturating a split toned image for best B+W results. It really lets me fine tune contrast in all areas of the photo. In camera mono always seems a bit flat.

So I guess that's a big NO for in camera from me.


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B&W In Camera?
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