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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 09 Mar 2014 (Sunday) 13:32
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Studio Shooting: Shoot RAW or jpeg?

 
professorman
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Mar 09, 2014 13:32 |  #1

I have always been a RAW shooter, however, I am now wondering if that is an overkill for studio usage.

What do you guys do who shoot in studio?

I know that I can get more processing options in RAW, however, I was playing around with B&W settings in my camera, saving both RAW+jpegs. I really like the processing in the camera, but now, I have to go figure out how to process them in lightroom to match my camera results. I think they are pretty good straight out the camera. Is there any major disadvantages to shooting jpeg for studio usage?


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mike_d
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Mar 09, 2014 15:04 |  #2

As long as your exposure and white balance are spot on, jpg is fine.




  
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sandpiper
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Mar 09, 2014 15:44 as a reply to  @ mike_d's post |  #3

If shooting b&w the last thing I would want to do is shoot jpeg, set to convert to b&w and throw away all the colour information. One of the most important controls in doing digital mono work is the use of the colour channels to adjust the tones of individual colours.

If you find that a blue item turns out the same shade of grey as an overlapping red item, so they seem to merge in the mono image (something you may not spot until you see the image after the shoot, as you will be seeing things in colour through the viewfinder) you need to be able to alter one or both. If your in camera jpeg conversion has thrown away the colour data you're stuck, using the raw data on a mono conversion allows you to use the red and blue channels to adjust one or both. You can make either any tone you want from very light to very dark.

Or simply adjusting the image in general. Want a darker sky to make the clouds stand out more? tweak the blue channel. Want to lighten the foliage? tweak the green channel.

OK, you are shooting in the studio, so have more contol over what you put in front of the camera, but that ability to adjust individual parts of an image is something that I just would never consider giving up, by letting the camera do a simple greyscale conversion and throw away all the colour data.

Why settle for "pretty good" out of the camera, when you can have the ability to adjust the image in so many ways, to get it just how you want it?




  
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tonylong
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Mar 09, 2014 16:28 |  #4

To me, it would all depend on what I'm trying to achieve (what my goals are for these photos), and then what my preferences are for the processing outcome.

One tool that could be useful for getting a "feel" for things is the Canon Raw processing app Digital Photo Professional. When shooting Raw, you have the ability to change to different Picture Styles (including Monochrome) so you can see what an out-of-camera jpeg would come out as. But with Raw you also have the abilities mentioned by Sandpiper to tweak the individual colors, as well as things like the White Balance and global Contrast, Saturation and Sharpness settings.

Of course, you can also make a move to shooting Raw+Jpeg. This way you can have "quick" jpegs (ones that you are happy with) and you can archive the Raw files in case you want to do more with them as time goes on.

But, that's presuming that you want to really do the digital darkroom "work" to optimize your shooting. There are people here who just shoot jpegs because they like the results and can quickly deliver pics to clients or editors without messing around with the Raw processing.


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professorman
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Mar 09, 2014 20:13 |  #5

tonylong wrote in post #16746067 (external link)
To me, it would all depend on what I'm trying to achieve (what my goals are for these photos), and then what my preferences are for the processing outcome.

But, that's presuming that you want to really do the digital darkroom "work" to optimize your shooting. There are people here who just shoot jpegs because they like the results and can quickly deliver pics to clients or editors without messing around with the Raw processing.

I have a 5D3, and I shoot RAW to the CF card and jpeg to the sd card. I have had my studio 2 months now, and I was playing around with some of the 'in camera' B&W, and I like the results. The client also liked the results. Now, I load my RAWs into lightroom, and now, I have to work on 'recreating' those same in-camera results. It has gotten me to start thinking, that since having my studio, lighting is so awesome, I dont really have a problem with exposure, nor white balance. I might be okay with shooting jpegs.

Right now, I am becoming more of a production line, rather than a hobbyist. I want to get speed up my work flow, and to be able to deliver to clients faster. I normally do heavy LR work, however, I am getting backlogged on my shoots. I need to speed up, and this 'recreation' of my B&W is going to slow me down, when I already liked what I got out the camera.

I know of one pro photographer who shoots jpeg in his studio. It just got me thinking that if everything is already good in camera, there really is not a lot of adjustments that I need.


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gonzogolf
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Mar 09, 2014 20:19 |  #6

Raw. The studio gives you control. But it still doesn't make you perfect. The flexibility of raw can still be useful. Since most of my studio work is portraits that will get post work to remove blemishes or soften skin I might as well start with the raw files.




  
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D ­ Thompson
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Mar 09, 2014 20:45 |  #7

Continue shooting RAW, but use DPP for those B&W's as it will recreate the in-camera jpeg.


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tonylong
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Mar 09, 2014 20:47 |  #8

professorman wrote in post #16746582 (external link)
I have a 5D3, and I shoot RAW to the CF card and jpeg to the sd card. I have had my studio 2 months now, and I was playing around with some of the 'in camera' B&W, and I like the results. The client also liked the results. Now, I load my RAWs into lightroom, and now, I have to work on 'recreating' those same in-camera results. It has gotten me to start thinking, that since having my studio, lighting is so awesome, I dont really have a problem with exposure, nor white balance. I might be okay with shooting jpegs.

Right now, I am becoming more of a production line, rather than a hobbyist. I want to get speed up my work flow, and to be able to deliver to clients faster. I normally do heavy LR work, however, I am getting backlogged on my shoots. I need to speed up, and this 'recreation' of my B&W is going to slow me down, when I already liked what I got out the camera.

I know of one pro photographer who shoots jpeg in his studio. It just got me thinking that if everything is already good in camera, there really is not a lot of adjustments that I need.

So, you give yourselves some reasonable reasons to go with the jpeg...

gonzogolf wrote in post #16746594 (external link)
Raw. The studio gives you control. But it still doesn't make you perfect. The flexibility of raw can still be useful. Since most of my studio work is portraits that will get post work to remove blemishes or soften skin I might as well start with the raw files.

But this is a good pre-caution to consider!

I'd say if there is any chance of doing processing on your image, Raw is the "best", although I see some good work done with jpegs...

If I was in your shoes, I might consider the DPP option, you can "see" what the in-camera jpeg would be and you can, if you wish, do a quick "batch process" of Raw to jpeg using those settings, or, if you wish, you can "tweak" things first!

But still, it's up to you, and if you are doing "assembly line" work with no personal "artistic/creative vision" involved that would benefit from the "digital darkroom", well, then!:)


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Mar 09, 2014 20:47 |  #9

I hate throwing away image data that might be useful some time in the future. I would shoot raw and then either play with some plug-ins such as Silver Efex or create presets in Lr to get the same look while keeping your workflow simple.


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professorman
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Mar 09, 2014 20:50 |  #10

bumpintheroad wrote in post #16746663 (external link)
I hate throwing away image data that might be useful some time in the future. I would shoot raw and then either play with some plug-ins such as Silver Efex or create presets in Lr to get the same look while keeping your workflow simple.

Its hard to process when I am getting 1,500 - 2,000 images in a week. I have images from so many years now, I never run out of stuff to shoot.....


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professorman
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Mar 09, 2014 21:47 |  #11

Well, I try editing and using the jpegs.... Turns out that I prefer my B&W conversions in LR from the RAW. The jpegs were great, but I prefer my conversion that I did myself :)


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Mar 09, 2014 22:10 |  #12

professorman wrote in post #16746825 (external link)
Well, I try editing and using the jpegs.... Turns out that I prefer my B&W conversions in LR from the RAW. The jpegs were great, but I prefer my conversion that I did myself :)

Well, then!:)


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Mar 13, 2014 09:12 |  #13

I always shoot RAW...


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Mar 13, 2014 09:58 |  #14

Why can't you shoot both? Further, in a studio you can shoot tethered and not worry about cards or storage - drives are inexpensive. You can have a pre-set in LR automatically convert the incoming raws into BW as you shoot, without committing your image to irreversible BW- once you find a look, that pre-set will do all of the work for you as you shoot. If you have clients on site, they can see the results in real-time and an assistant can change the look with other pre-sets. Once your shoot is finished, choose your selects and export them and you are done. If you need color images, or split-tone images, or whatever, you just make a virtual copy and apply those settings.

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professorman
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Mar 13, 2014 10:06 |  #15

kirkt wrote in post #16755431 (external link)
Why can't you shoot both? Further, in a studio you can shoot tethered and not worry about cards or storage - drives are inexpensive. You can have a pre-set in LR automatically convert the incoming raws into BW as you shoot, without committing your image to irreversible BW- once you find a look, that pre-set will do all of the work for you as you shoot. If you have clients on site, they can see the results in real-time and an assistant can change the look with other pre-sets. Once your shoot is finished, choose your selects and export them and you are done. If you need color images, or split-tone images, or whatever, you just make a virtual copy and apply those settings.

kirk

I dont like wires, but how well does those eye-fi cards work? That is an interesting setup that I might consider investigating. It sounds like it would reduce my processing time.

I do like the display on the 5D3, which is SPECTACULAR! I typically review the shots on the camera with the ability to rate the pictures in camera. When I import them into light room, I have those same ratings.


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