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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 09 Mar 2014 (Sunday) 21:15
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Top quality circular polarizer

 
Craign
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Mar 10, 2014 15:36 |  #16

$40.00 here: http://www.ebay.com …lters&hash=item​1e6ae2c635 (external link)


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kachadurian
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Mar 10, 2014 15:58 |  #17

After years of using polarizers I've come to a few conclusions, which I'm going to give you even though you didn't ask.

First, they are not all the same in rendering, beyond clarity. B&W filters are quite cold in their rendering. And amazingly difficult to clean.

When you use a polarizer you will almost always have the sun or light at your back, which means flare resistance is not important as it is in other instances.

With any wide angle lens (and let's be honest that's where most polarizing is done) a circular polarizer will give you a strange arc-like gradient in the sky if the sun is the least bit off axis. One side will be darker than the other. This is not the case with linear polarizers, which give you an even sky. Also, you only need a circ polarizer for the AF systems to work accurately, and that again is not much of an issue with wide angle lenses and f8 or f11.

For the last several years I have gone with only linear polarizers and haven't ever had a focus shift.

I have also found that I like the color rendering of the Tiffen filters the best.

Before you shell out the big bucks for an expensive coated circ polarizer buy a $15 Tiffen Linear polarizer and try it. If it distorts your image in any way then try something else. If it will make you feel more secure buy a hard to clean Multicoated filter, but as I said before, flare is almost never an issue with photos employing a polarizer.

I see a lot of money wasted on filters. Your mileage my vary.

Tom


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VirtualRain
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Mar 10, 2014 16:10 |  #18

As far as buying filters... Is maxsavers.net still in business?... I just tried visiting their site and see it's gone.


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Boone13
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Mar 10, 2014 16:26 |  #19

I'm using B+W ones, and not just because it's B+W. I had the fortunate opportunity to try quite a few different brands, some cheap, some not, and after reviewing images on the PC, I liked my B+W images. The Marumi filters were good as well. The reality is it depends on what you like. Someone could use a Tiffen filter and like it.


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dpds68
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Mar 10, 2014 16:37 |  #20

kachadurian wrote in post #16748753 (external link)
When you use a polarizer you will almost always have the sun or light at your back, which means flare resistance is not important as it is in other instances.


Is it not that the sun should be at 90° to the lens when using a CP ??


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Mar 10, 2014 16:43 |  #21
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dpds68 wrote in post #16748823 (external link)
Is it not that the sun should be at 90° to the lens when using a CP ??

Yup. I was mystified by that statement as well.


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Boone13
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Mar 10, 2014 17:28 |  #22

dpds68 wrote in post #16748823 (external link)
Is it not that the sun should be at 90° to the lens when using a CP ??

Having spent an entire day using CPL's, I too can say this is the case. The results were negligible if not nonexistent any other way.


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Sirrith
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Mar 10, 2014 20:01 |  #23

dpds68 wrote in post #16747719 (external link)
Tiffen are on the low end in quality as far as I know .

Generally, perhaps. But these ones cost more than B+W Kaesemann's!


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kachadurian
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Mar 10, 2014 21:09 |  #24

dpds68 wrote in post #16748823 (external link)
Is it not that the sun should be at 90° to the lens when using a CP ??

The filter needs to be rotated so the index mark is at 90deg to the sun, but the sun, relative to the camera can be pretty much anywhere as long as it is in a plane behind the camera that is parallel with the sensor plane.

You should never have the light source hitting the front element of the lens or filter in the sort of shot you want polarized.

I may not be explaining this well, but this is 25 years of professional landscape experience I'm drawing on.

Tom


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dpds68
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Mar 10, 2014 21:38 |  #25

^^^ Okay , I think this is the thread that I read when I was getting my first CPL so this is what I learned and used , thank you for your input I will be testing .

David


https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=507287


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Alveric
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Mar 10, 2014 21:44 |  #26
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kachadurian wrote in post #16749416 (external link)
The filter needs to be rotated so the index mark is at 90deg to the sun, but the sun, relative to the camera can be pretty much anywhere as long as it is in a plane behind the camera that is parallel with the sensor plane.

You should never have the light source hitting the front element of the lens or filter in the sort of shot you want polarized.

I may not be explaining this well, but this is 25 years of professional landscape experience I'm drawing on.

Tom

I think this is incorrect, sir. Unfortunately, I do not have the sun available right now to run a quick test to confirm, but shall do so to-morrow and post pics with my findings.


'The success of the second-rate is deplorable in itself; but it is more deplorable in that it very often obscures the genuine masterpiece. If the crowd runs after the false, it must neglect the true.' —Arthur Machen
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gnome ­ chompski
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Mar 10, 2014 21:52 |  #27

B and W and marumi are great


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Dillan_K
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Mar 10, 2014 23:34 |  #28

A note on Kaesemann polarizers, if you're tempted to spend the big bucks: all it means is that it's sealed for use in humid conditions. If you're living in Florida it's a good idea. If you're from Nevada, it's not so important--unless, of course, you wish to travel to humid places. They're useful when you want to avoid a fungal infection of your polarizer.


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melcat
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Mar 11, 2014 03:24 |  #29

kachadurian wrote in post #16748753 (external link)
With any wide angle lens (and let's be honest that's where most polarizing is done) a circular polarizer will give you a strange arc-like gradient in the sky if the sun is the least bit off axis. One side will be darker than the other. This is not the case with linear polarizers, which give you an even sky.

This is incorrect. A circular polariser is nothing more than a linear polariser stacked with a plate that makes the polarisation vector rotate about the axis (so delivering all polarisations equally at any realistic shutter speed). As such, the shading will be the same. It is due to the physics of the atmosphere.

And polarisers are useful at other focal lengths. I have them for my 100mm, 180mm and 300mm lenses.

Also, you only need a circ polarizer for the AF systems to work accurately, and that again is not much of an issue with wide angle lenses and f8 or f11. For the last several years I have gone with only linear polarizers and haven't ever had a focus shift.

I think you have this backwards. It's the reflected component of the (polarised) light that has its polarisation altered, so it's the metering that would be screwed up. The AF module sees the transmitted component via the submirror, which isn't half-silvered.

OP: I like the B+W Käsemann. The Hoya "digital multicoated" ones are harder to clean. Also beware some brands which have the knurling on the rotating part of the filter instead of the part that screws on - they can be very hard to get off the lens. I have a Hoya like that.




  
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jimmyt
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Mar 17, 2015 16:50 |  #30

Is this the good filter
Marumi DHG Super Circular Polarizer CPL PL.D 77

http://www.amazon.com …izer-Filter/dp/B003QSG0HK (external link)

what is this ( CPL PL.D) stand for?


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Top quality circular polarizer
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