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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 12 Mar 2014 (Wednesday) 11:31
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Q regarding the tilt of a TS-E lens

 
pstyle1
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Mar 12, 2014 11:31 |  #1

I recently acquired a 45mm TS-E and have a couple of questions regarding the tilt.
I haven't had enough time to go out and find out for myself so I'm asking for your expertise.

When using the tilt feature to get the miniature effect, does it matter which way the lens is tilted when shooting a wide scene? Does that effect the top or bottom bokeh?

Also, does the aperture make a difference in the amount of tilt bokeh? I.e, if I shoot a wide scene with full tilt at f2.8 and then at f11, will the 2.8 shot have more tilt bokeh?

Thanks for your help.


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gasrocks
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Mar 12, 2014 12:37 |  #2

There is indeed a long learning curve for using a T/S lens. Have you tired a Google? "Amount of tilt bokeh..." a phrase I have never heard before. Hope you did not spend that much just to get the "minature effect." T/S is about so much more.


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PixelPusher
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Mar 12, 2014 15:30 |  #3

Had my 45 T/S for a couple of years, never used it for the miniature effect. Mostly just to either fix the tilt/lean of buildings for architectural shots (outdoor) or for getting product shots straight that were long and linear. Fun lens, but a learning curve for sure. Just experiment with it and see where it puts the focus plane.

One thing that helped me a lot was to put your camera in live view tethered up to a laptop so you can see how the tilt and shift effects your image in real time while adjusting the T/S knobs.


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coogee
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Mar 12, 2014 16:35 |  #4

I found this pretty useful to get a handle on visualising the tilt/shift outcome
http://www.cambridgein​colour.com …ls/tilt-shift-lenses1.htm (external link)




  
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pstyle1
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Mar 12, 2014 17:10 |  #5

Thanks.. I did in fact get it mainly for the "tilt bokeh" although I understand that a T/S is about more than that. Mainly interested to use it for creative portrait work, but I'm sure I'll come in handy for other stuff too.

Coogee, I lived in Sydney for 2 years and miss it immensely!


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coogee
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Mar 12, 2014 19:45 |  #6

Raining here in Sydney today if it makes you feel any better! :)

The 'miniature effect' generally comes from being above a scene looking down, and tilting the lens up to reduce the focal plane to a slice.

Generally, you would tilt up to reduce the focal plane to a slice of what's in front of you, and tilt down to extend it from your feet towards the horizon. Obviously it's more involved than that once you move the camera off the horizontal/change DoF/have a more complex scene in front of you.

This page explains things properly:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_p​ages/using_tilt.html (external link)

Exactly the same as if you had a normal lens with a (relatively) flat perpendicular focal plane, the more you reduce your aperture, the longer your focal plane becomes -> exactly the same on a TS lens.
So f/2.8 will give a far more pronounced effect than f/11. Use your DOF button or Liveview to see it in action.

FWIW the 45mm sounds perfect for what you want, I used to have one, but sold it to fund a 24mm.
Here's a (not particularly good) example from the 45mm that has the focal plane running horizontally across the middle of the image, so above and below will provide your OOF areas. Manipulate the angle/amount/direction of tilt to taste.

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7402/10503974166_544966a8ae_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/dylansworld/10​503974166/  (external link)
Cafe Lounge (external link)

My tip is to call it 'selective focusing', then everyone gets far more comfortable than when you say 'miniature effect' :lol::lol: - extreme tilt won't necessarily make things look smaller anyway depending on your relationship to the subject (ie; being above etc.)

Have fun!



  
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pstyle1
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Mar 20, 2014 19:31 |  #7

cheers mate!


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Mike ­ K
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Mar 20, 2014 21:55 |  #8

pstyle1 wrote in post #16753170 (external link)
When using the tilt feature to get the miniature effect, does it matter which way the lens is tilted when shooting a wide scene? Does that effect the top or bottom bokeh?

Also, does the aperture make a difference in the amount of tilt bokeh? I.e, if I shoot a wide scene with full tilt at f2.8 and then at f11, will the 2.8 shot have more tilt bokeh?

watch this short 3 part tutorial on some introduction to T/S lens use, including miniature scenes and increased bokeh with portraits, Yes just like normal photography wider apertures result in less dof and greater out of focus blurring.
http://www.learn.usa.c​anon.com …ift_laforet_gal​lery.shtml (external link)

Mike K


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bogeypro
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Mar 21, 2014 10:26 as a reply to  @ Mike K's post |  #9

There's a link to a "tilt shift" series of articles on the Fred Miranda home page, might be worth taking a look




  
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Mar 21, 2014 12:40 |  #10

Go here:
https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1045907


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Q regarding the tilt of a TS-E lens
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