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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 12 Mar 2014 (Wednesday) 02:15
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24L II vs 24 TS-E II

 
bberg
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Mar 12, 2014 23:00 as a reply to  @ post 16753997 |  #16

Definitely not an easy decision here by any stretch. I've actually had both as well and ended up selling the 24 TS-E II. I know you guys are going to think I'm crazy, but I needed the flexibility of AF and the low-light capabilities of f1.4.

If you have the money to have another more flexible lens in the same focal range, the TS-E II is an easy decision. In my case, I wanted the capability to take indoor shots of my son and other family members at events. The 24 TS-E doesn't excel in this area - it's just too slow for indoor use in dim lighting without a tripod and the need to manually focus means a lot of missed shots unless your subject is static.

One note on size, the 24 TS-E II seems gigantic compared to the 24 f1.4. For travel I'd definitely prefer the latter as it's more discreet and the weather sealing is a bonus. I took my TS-E to Hawaii last year and I was constantly worried about getting water or sand inside the lens. No question the 24 TS-E is a better 'pure landscape/architecture​' lens, but it's lack of flexibility will mean a lot of missed shots if you intend to use it as a general purpose 24mm.

Good luck with your decision!

-Brandon


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bberg
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Mar 12, 2014 23:01 as a reply to  @ bberg's post |  #17

I meant to add... You can see photos I've taken with both lenses on my Flickr site, which is linked in my signature. You'll definitely find the bokeh and OOF areas very different between the two lenses, as one poster alluded to earlier.


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Mike ­ K
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Mar 12, 2014 23:54 |  #18

The version II of the 24 TSE has remarkably little CA, which results in a very clear image. Love it! At extremes of tilt or shift it will degrade in the corners. The version I had the extremes of tilt and shift marked in red on the lens barrel, as the image quality would really suffer at the tilt and shift extremes. Even in the center it wasn't anywhere hear as crisp. In my hands a big difference.

The 17 and 24II TSE lenses have been an enormous creative inspiration to my landscape photography. It really challenged me to look at my compositions from a different angle.
Mike K


Canon 6D, 1DmkII, IR modified 5DII with lots of Canon L, TSE and Zeiss ZE lenses

  
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melcat
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Mar 13, 2014 04:35 |  #19

ejenner wrote in post #16753921 (external link)
I've hear Roger at Lensrentals say it happens to their rentals, but I've never felt like I was going to do that with my 17mm.

I don't think they are that flimsy, just don't force anything - all the tilt/shift actions should be as smooth as butter. I think it is purely a 'rental vs. own' mentality.

There was a long and inconclusive thread about this on Fred Miranda. It is clear the two new TS-E's have had a lot of failures of the TS mechanism, and it's expensive to fix. My personal theory was that some people are misusing the lock as a tension control and applying tilt/shift with it half on and half off.

If you buy this lens, read the instructions!




  
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davidfarina
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Mar 13, 2014 05:47 |  #20

Mike K wrote in post #16754734 (external link)
The version II of the 24 TSE has remarkably little CA, which results in a very clear image. Love it! At extremes of tilt or shift it will degrade in the corners. The version I had the extremes of tilt and shift marked in red on the lens barrel, as the image quality would really suffer at the tilt and shift extremes. Even in the center it wasn't anywhere hear as crisp. In my hands a big difference.

The 17 and 24II TSE lenses have been an enormous creative inspiration to my landscape photography. It really challenged me to look at my compositions from a different angle.
Mike K

But honestly, even at max shift my 24 tse is sharper than my 16-35 compared center/center and corner/corner


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nburwell
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Mar 13, 2014 12:43 |  #21

I've owned both lenses (not at the same time). I primarily used the 24 II for astrophotography work, but I ended up selling it because I realized I wanted to shoot a bit wider than 24mm. I still have the TS-E 24mm II, and it's honestly my workhorse lens. Whether it's for cityscape or landscape work. Sadly, I will be selling it since I'm putting all my gear for sale, but if I were sticking with Canon, I absolutley would not get rid of it. This is coming from someone who's lens lineup changes frequently. It's that good of a lens.

-Nick




  
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texshooter
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Mar 13, 2014 22:45 as a reply to  @ post 16753997 |  #22

24mm tilt/shift without question. For correcting barrel distortion and for panorama stitching.




  
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melcat
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Mar 14, 2014 03:59 |  #23

texshooter wrote in post #16757163 (external link)
For correcting barrel distortion...

Probably you just made a slip and meant to say "perspective distortion" (which of course isn't actually distortion). But for the benefit of others: the 24mm f/3.5 TS-E Mk II does in fact have 0.9% barrel distortion at typical testing distances, which is visible. Sometimes I correct it, and sometimes I don't bother. It may or may not be possible to correct it in Lightroom if the lens is shifted. I only have Photoshop, and the procedure there is manual if the lens was shifted, since the EXIF does not record the amount or direction of shift.

For comparison, the same testing site (www.photozone.de (external link)) which gave the 0.9% figure for the TS-E gives 1.4% for the 24mm f/1.4, and describes that as "pretty bad".




  
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Adharr
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Mar 15, 2014 00:34 |  #24
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VirtualRain wrote in post #16752380 (external link)
Anyone go through this decision making process for landscape or cityscape type photography? What did you choose and why?

Obviously they are very different... AF vs MF, f/1.4 vs f/3.5, no TS vs TS, $1300 vs $1700 (refurb), small vs large, etc... In fact, about all they have in common is focal length. But that does mean they can both be used effectively for landscape and cityscape type shots which is what I'm considering.

For landscape and architecture work, absolutely go for the 24mm f/3.5 II tilt shift. You are unlikely to shoot below f/8, so the wide aperture isn't going to do anything for you. You will always use precision manual focus by determining your near and far focus distances, so again autofocus isn't going to do anything for you. You will use shift almost every time you take an architectural photograph, so you will need the shift function to get maximum resolution images for production instead of stretching and squeezing pixels in Photoshop or Lightroom.

The reason you would get the 24mm f1.4 II is if you wanted to take advantage of bokeh effects or handhold shoot in low light at low ISO and you didn't mind a kind of narrow depth of field if you're focusing on stuff less than 15 feet in front of the camera.

But you didn't say that is one of your applications, so definitely buy the tilt shift because you aren't going to take advantage of anything the 24 f/1.4 II is offering.

I own both for two separate applications. I would never use the 24 f/1.4 II for architectural or landscape work, and the reason I bought the 24 f/3.5 II is because I needed production quality for my architectural business that was lacking when I was trying to use a 16-35 f/2.8 II. It was a night and day difference in terms of production value once I got the tilt shift.


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24L II vs 24 TS-E II
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