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Thread started 18 Sep 2009 (Friday) 14:40
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Is a Photography Degree Worth It?

 
airfrogusmc
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Oct 05, 2009 12:54 |  #16

yogestee wrote in post #8764677 (external link)
What has being formally trained has taught me besides teaching me the technical aspects of photography is discipline.. The discipline to work to deadlines and layouts,,and to decypher clients' needs..

Four years at college were tough.. Every assignment either written or pictorial had to be followed to the letter.. Pictorial assignments your teacher became your client.. If you missed a deadline or waivered from the layout or written job discription by the nth degree you got a big fat red F..

There are many brilliant amateur photographers who are technically perfect and artistically creative but give them a layout or job description they'd fall apart..

Yep and it made me realize that consistency is one of the key ingredients to success.Its much easier to not be under a dead line or any pressure to get great images than to have to be creative on demand and the assignments and deadlines in college to help prepare you for that. CONSISTENCY is a key element to success. And your work needs to be on a high level along with a high degree of consistency. You are only as good as your last job. Screw it up or don't come back with what the client is looking for you'r probably not going to get another call from that client. And its a much smaller world out there than one might think.




  
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yogestee
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Oct 05, 2009 13:05 |  #17

airfrogusmc wrote in post #8764878 (external link)
Yep and it made me realize that consistency is one of the key ingredients to success.Its much easier to not be under a dead line or any pressure to get great images than to have to be creative on demand and the assignments and deadlines in college to help prepare you for that. CONSISTENCY is a key element to success. And your work needs to be on a high level along with a high degree of consistency. You are only as good as your last job. Screw it up or don't come back with what the client is looking for you'r probably not going to get another call from that client. And its a much smaller world out there than one might think.

We are going a bit off topic here but I agree with you.. Setting a high standard and maintaining that consistency is the key for success for any business..


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airfrogusmc
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Oct 05, 2009 16:19 |  #18

yogestee wrote in post #8764922 (external link)
We are going a bit off topic here but I agree with you.. Setting a high standard and maintaining that consistency is the key for success for any business..

Not sure we drifted to far because if you go to the right school all of that ground work is laid there and having the visual and technical skills are key to consistency giving a greater chance for success.




  
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yogestee
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Oct 05, 2009 20:21 as a reply to  @ airfrogusmc's post |  #19

One thing I forgot to mention.. When I was studying photography there was a notice board where prospective clients would advertise freelance jobs for students.. I managed to get a few gigs out of this which paid quite well..


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benesotor
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Oct 06, 2009 12:41 |  #20

Thanks everyone for the interesting responses. I'm just collating advice from various sources about various degree's right now.
For the time being, I've been offered a job with a wedding/events photography company, so who knows how that'll work out. Early days though, I be only 16 :P




  
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MikeFairbanks
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Oct 06, 2009 17:38 |  #21

For what it's worth: I, like MOST people on this planet, did NOT follow my passion, and I often regret it.

Sure, I have a good job that I like, and it pays well and has good benefits, but if I could poof myself back to 1986 (the year I finished high school), I'd have the confidence to be both of the things I dreamed of doing: professional surfing and becoming a rock star.


FOLLOW YOUR PASSION WHILE YOU'RE YOUNG.


Or doubt yourself for the next ten years and get an office job that pays the bills.


My advice:

1. Don't incur debt. No matter how tempting it is, do NOT borrow money (unless it's for school and you're following your dream).

2. Don't get married or have kids until AFTER you are in the career of your dreams.

3. Travel to the places you want to see before you get married and have kids.

4. Give your life to Christ. Heck, that's actually number one. It costs nothing and doesn't ruin any dreams (unless your dream is to be a professional hitman or something).


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heyimnick
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Oct 06, 2009 19:27 |  #22

MikeFairbanks wrote in post #8773383 (external link)
4. Give your life to Christ. Heck, that's actually number one. It costs nothing and doesn't ruin any dreams (unless your dream is to be a professional hitman or something).

Amen to that!

Follow your dreams, don't let barriers get in the way. You will find that there is much more benefits in learning photography in a classroom environment than doing it by yourself. You get to play with LF/MF/35mm cameras, learn the history behind them, develop shots in a darkroom and best of all, collaborate. Going on the same homework assignment with two or three other classmates is much more fun than doing it by yourself and it keeps your motivation up.

When its all said and done, even if the naked eye doesnt really care about educational experience, you will still have enough knowledge and discipline in your head to put any self-taught photographer behind you.


"Be yourself, everyone else is already taken." --Unknown

  
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yogestee
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Oct 06, 2009 20:23 |  #23

MikeFairbanks wrote in post #8773383 (external link)
For what it's worth: I, like MOST people on this planet, did NOT follow my passion, and I often regret it.

Sure, I have a good job that I like, and it pays well and has good benefits, but if I could poof myself back to 1986 (the year I finished high school), I'd have the confidence to be both of the things I dreamed of doing: professional surfing and becoming a rock star.

FOLLOW YOUR PASSION WHILE YOU'RE YOUNG.

Or doubt yourself for the next ten years and get an office job that pays the bills.

My advice:

1. Don't incur debt. No matter how tempting it is, do NOT borrow money (unless it's for school and you're following your dream).

2. Don't get married or have kids until AFTER you are in the career of your dreams.

3. Travel to the places you want to see before you get married and have kids.

4. Give your life to Christ. Heck, that's actually number one. It costs nothing and doesn't ruin any dreams (unless your dream is to be a professional hitman or something).

I knew what I wanted to do before I left school.. I didn't follow my dream at first but a few years later after leaving school went that direction..

I worked hard during my studies (photography) and made a damn good living out of photography for 28 years.. And I didn't follow Christ..

Retired from pro photography in July '07, although I still shoot the odd paid gig now..

I now class myelf as a hobbyist but I still have the passion for photography I had when I was 17..


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benesotor
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Oct 07, 2009 10:32 |  #24

Well my plan before anything is to travel, and build up an amazing portfolio from around the world :)




  
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airfrogusmc
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Oct 07, 2009 13:34 |  #25

benesotor wrote in post #8777759 (external link)
Well my plan before anything is to travel, and build up an amazing portfolio from around the world :)

College was also one of those life changing WONDERFUL experiences and some of the friendships I made there have lasted and will last a lifetime. Being in a full time creative environment and being around other creative people was a an experience that I will always treasure.




  
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PMCphotography
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Oct 07, 2009 17:53 |  #26

the college experience itself is a great experience to have..Learning to be self motivated, to meet deadlines, break complex problems into manageable pieces...

But taking photography as a major, if you're planning on opening your own small business isn't necesarily the best choice, in my opinion. You have to take a lot of general art history classes (which is cool if you're into that sort of thing), and you spend a lot of time talking, thinking, and writing about photography as it fits into the fine art world. You will look at pictures of shattered glass and asked to write a 3,000 word essay on the intended meaning the photographer was trying to convey, and it's place in the neo-modern conciousness and philosophy.

If you are interested in running a photography business, i think you'd be much better off taking business and accounting classes.


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heyimnick
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Oct 07, 2009 18:54 |  #27

Also, as a photography student you get insane discounts on alot of stuff like Adobe software and equipment. Just a perk, but paying $300 for Creative Suite instead of $1000 is a huge deal :)


"Be yourself, everyone else is already taken." --Unknown

  
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benesotor
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Oct 08, 2009 07:44 |  #28

heyimnick wrote in post #8780733 (external link)
Also, as a photography student you get insane discounts on alot of stuff like Adobe software and equipment. Just a perk, but paying $300 for Creative Suite instead of $1000 is a huge deal :)

True, but already got the creative suite :P




  
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rks221
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Mar 15, 2014 11:02 |  #29

There's pros and cons to the degree. If you want to enter the industry and start your own business it can be looked at as money wasted. However having the degree does open up the possibility of teaching art and photography in an academic setting as a means of making an income so if you think that you might wanted be involved in the academia of art then the degree is a must.




  
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Clean ­ Gene
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Mar 20, 2014 14:51 |  #30

I;m not necessarily saying it's worth it, but one perk is getting to use the school's equipment. Depending on where you go, they may have cool stuff that the average person is likely to never be able to afford to buy on their own.




  
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