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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 24 Mar 2014 (Monday) 10:07
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Event photography: Declining personal photo requests

 
OhLook
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Mar 24, 2014 22:49 |  #16

banquetbear wrote in post #16784049 (external link)
The position held by other photographers wasn't "you couldn't do anything else with our time".

That was precisely the position held by some photographers, notably the one who basically accused me of being an unethical person just for examining the idea and asking questions. If he pays someone to cover an event for three hours, that person had better not take other pictures during those hours. It's "double dipping" (ugh!), and he'll be "blackballed" (eek!). Don't you remember? (Granted, I have more reason to remember, given that I was the one attacked. I tend to remember such incidents.)

In the other thread you suggested it would be appropriate to market images to people other than your client.

I was talking about a possible situation in which you're at an event and someone other than your client asks you for photos, which may be additional ones besides what your original assignment calls for. I'm bringing up this past discussion because that situation is similar to what the OP described, and no one so far has mentioned that agreeing on the spot to take shots for someone attending an event is frowned on by some hired photographers and those who hire them.


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sspellman
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Mar 25, 2014 03:44 |  #17

Your client should have an understanding that turning down every personal smartphone request will irritate some of their customers as rude. For my clients, I don't have any issues with taking the occasional smartphone photos. I don't encourage it, but always rejecting it will make both the photographer and event producer seem rude. You should have a discussion with your client such as "what should I do when your guests want smartphone pics?"


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CAPhotog
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Mar 25, 2014 10:36 as a reply to  @ post 16783530 |  #18

All interesting replies... My original post was intended as, "What do you say?" I was hoping to see unique responses, maybe even clever or new.

Contracts, clients and personalities vary. There might be a hundred different categories of events, large and small. So, no real point in a general debate of "should you or shouldn't you?". Each situation is different and a judgment call. Smartphones are everywhere. They get in the way. So, what have you come up with to say?




  
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CAPhotog
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Mar 25, 2014 11:06 |  #19

Recently, my common turn down is boring: sorry, I can't right now. They may still plead it will only take a second, so not wholly effective. "I'm not allowed" works, but isn't always true or they see me taking someone else's pic later.

The one that baffles me is when couples ask me to take their photo with my camera at a large event, maybe thousands of people. Then they just walk away without asking who I'm shooting for or where they might see the photo.




  
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amber ­ j2010
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Apr 09, 2014 12:00 |  #20

Wow, I've never had this issue, but never done events other than weddings. Personally, I would be offended, it just seems so rude to me. But then I grew up in a family where it was a crime to ask a favor of someone, especially a stranger. Maybe 'Sorry, I'm on the clock here." would convey the message that you are busy doing the job you were contracted for?


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peeaanuut
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Apr 09, 2014 12:03 |  #21

hairy_moth wrote in post #16782200 (external link)
I did this recently, but I felt like a real jerk afterwards:
A person asked me to take a photo of them with their i-phone. I told them "I've never used one before but that I'd be happy to try." That was a lie, I have one. When I was lining up the picture, I discreetly flipped the switch to use the front side camera and then gave them a picture of me. As I handed them the phone, I said "I don't think it worked right, but it is a beautiful picture!"

Thats sort of my SOP for anyone asking me to take a pic of them with their camera. They almost always take a few seconds to get ready so I snap a quick selfie without telling them. I let them figure it out later.


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bps
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Apr 09, 2014 15:10 |  #22

hairy_moth wrote in post #16782200 (external link)
I did this recently, but I felt like a real jerk afterwards:
A person asked me to take a photo of them with their i-phone. I told them "I've never used one before but that I'd be happy to try." That was a lie, I have one. When I was lining up the picture, I discreetly flipped the switch to use the front side camera and then gave them a picture of me. As I handed them the phone, I said "I don't think it worked right, but it is a beautiful picture!"

LOL! :lol:

That's a great story!

Bryan


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Shane ­ W
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Apr 10, 2014 05:30 |  #23

This really seems like a no-brianer! You have two options- take a photo for them.. or don't. If you have time and want to help, then do it. If you are not interested, it's as simple as saying "I can't but he/she might" and pointing to the next closest person. you really don't have to have a big contract/client/liabil​ity type of story to explain your decline of their request because if you have time to say that much, you had time to take it in the first place.


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ceegee
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Apr 10, 2014 08:34 |  #24

I agree it's probably not the type of situation in which to give a "smart" answer, which will only reflect badly on you. Either you can take the pic, or you can't/don't want to. So the answer would be "sure, give me your phone" or "sorry, I can't/have been asked not to/don't have time, maybe you can ask someone else". No explanations needed. I've photographed a few outdoor sports trials, and people have only ever approached me for personal photos during breaks between events. I've usually smiled and taken the shot for them. Nobody has ever come and tapped me on the shoulder when I've been looking through the viewfinder or tracking the action. If they had, I'd have said "sorry, I'm busy right now, can you come back at the end of the class".


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Bakewell
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Apr 10, 2014 11:09 |  #25
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CAPhotog wrote in post #16784969 (external link)
The one that baffles me is when couples ask me to take their photo with my camera at a large event, maybe thousands of people. Then they just walk away without asking who I'm shooting for or where they might see the photo.

I'm not a pro wedding photographer but do attend and bring my camera to weddings I'm invited to. People constantly ask me to take their pic...entire family groups, couples, etc. They obviously believe I'm part of the official staff and my pics will end up in an album or on FB. Like you, they never ask about where the photos will show up. Just, "Hey, take a pic of us"!


Dave

  
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scorpio_e
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Apr 10, 2014 17:00 |  #26

Can't even see why this is an issue. It take 5 maybe 10 seconds to take a picture with an IPhone or whatever. You take the pict..smile and walk away. In most cases these are guests of people holding the event. Saying no is just rude.


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Hogloff
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Apr 10, 2014 17:29 |  #27
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gonzogolf wrote in post #16782330 (external link)
My point is if you go in and make it about you, and what you will and will not do, you are setting a bad tone which will likely project. If its not convenient, I'll say grab me later, or I cant right now. If its really important to the guest they will come back, or if not let it slide with no feelings hurt.

Bingo...there are always two ways to handle a situation...the right way and the wrong way.




  
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Event photography: Declining personal photo requests
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