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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 03 Mar 2014 (Monday) 09:10
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Photographing in Bear and Cougar Country

 
Sparky98
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Mar 23, 2014 16:24 |  #106

If you happen to see a bear and can't tell whether it's a black or a grizzly bear, there is a surefire way to determine which it is. Sneak around behind the bear and find a tree close by that you can climb. Creep up and slap the bear on the rump. The startled bear will initially run away from you giving you time to run climb the nearby tree before the bear turns to pursue you. If it is a black bear it will climb the tree and eat you. If it is a grizzly bear it will push the tree over and eat you.


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eriet30
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Mar 23, 2014 17:15 |  #107

20droger wrote in post #16740967 (external link)
Always take you wife with you when you go into the wild, or someone else who runs slower than you do.


When I lived in the NW my wife and I bought Mt Bikes and went to Mt Spokane hit a trail and coming around a corner saw something BIG move to the left and down the hill.. As it was going down small trees were shaking and there was a lot of growling...... I turned to tell the wife lets go back and she was gone....... 1 mile later up the hill she turns and says .... "I thought you were with me"... yeah right she just wanted to be faster then me so I would get eaten.


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digital ­ paradise
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Mar 23, 2014 17:17 |  #108

You can never trust them, especially if they have been checking your insurance policy :p


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*Jayrou
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Mar 24, 2014 09:21 |  #109

ejenner wrote in post #16741677 (external link)
I started reading that (I think after my bear encounter) and couldn't finish it. I still hike in bear country and wouldn't hesitate to go back out to Denali, even the same location, but I'm not sure I can recommend the book. It certainly wouldn't have helped me, probably just freaked me out more.

I still stick with the 'stay calm and figure out what the bear is doing/wants/is trying to tell you' mantra. What how he/she reacts to what you do and be aware of your surroundings.

Like they say 'stand your ground'. Might be good advice in some cases, but not in others, same with 'play dead', 'make noise' etc..


Well having read the majority of this book Edward.. Id have to agree with you.

Basically it included all types of attacks and what preventative measures worked for one , got another killed... there are some horrendus attacks in it.

I dont get those who go camping in Bear country .. wow!.. one in the book she was camping on her own.. ON HER OWN! ,she was dragged from her camp and partially eaten..:(


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20droger
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Mar 24, 2014 10:48 as a reply to  @ *Jayrou's post |  #110

The trouble with books or advice on bear attacks is that all bears are different, just like people. And none of them are like Yogi or Boo-Boo.

If your luck is like mine, the "harmless" black bear you run across will have just lost to Mrs. Bear's "headache" and been gored in the butt by an angry stag. Trust me, playing dead won't help you.




  
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20droger
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Mar 24, 2014 10:50 |  #111

*Jayrou wrote in post #16782064 (external link)
Well having read the majority of this book Edward.. Id have to agree with you.

Basically it included all types of attacks and what preventative measures worked for one , got another killed... there are some horrendus attacks in it.

I dont get those who go camping in Bear country .. wow!.. one in the book she was camping on her own.. ON HER OWN! ,she was dragged from her camp and partially eaten..:(

According to Gary Larson's "The Far Side," bears love sleeping bags: they're soft on the outside and crunchy in the middle.




  
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skilsaw
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Mar 25, 2014 16:44 as a reply to  @ 20droger's post |  #112

Pack your bag with all your heaviest camera gear,
Rub a raw steak on the outside of the bag.
Hire an assistant to carry the bag,
Carry an axe.

In the off chance you are confronted by an angry bear, tell your assistant to "Grab the bag and run". Then hit him in the knee with the axe so that you will be sure to be faster than him.




  
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skilsaw
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Mar 25, 2014 16:53 |  #113

Hikers in bear country have been advised to tie bells to their rucksack so that the bears will hear them coming and leave them alone.
If you see bear poo on the trail, you will know it is Grizzly poo because it has little bells in it.




  
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ejenner
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Mar 25, 2014 23:16 |  #114

20droger wrote in post #16782284 (external link)
According to Gary Larson's "The Far Side," bears love sleeping bags: they're soft on the outside and crunchy in the middle.

Ooooh. I like it. Larson's funny.

Although it brings back memories of my bear encounter where I was separated from my wife who was hiding in her sleeping bag (in a tent, griz was literally 5ft from her though) and all I could do was hope the bear didn't go for the 'snack'.

But that's still hilarious.


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20droger
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Mar 26, 2014 01:35 |  #115

ejenner wrote in post #16786751 (external link)
Ooooh. I like it. Larson's funny.

Although it brings back memories of my bear encounter where I was separated from my wife who was hiding in her sleeping bag (in a tent, griz was literally 5ft from her though) and all I could do was hope the bear didn't go for the 'snack'.

But that's still hilarious.

Thank God for bear-proof tents! Oh, wait....




  
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skilsaw
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Mar 26, 2014 02:09 as a reply to  @ Sparky98's post |  #116

Pepper spray is available if you are going into an area where the bears like spicy food.




  
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badams
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Mar 28, 2014 09:59 |  #117

Sparky98 wrote in post #16780354 (external link)
If you happen to see a bear and can't tell whether it's a black or a grizzly bear, there is a surefire way to determine which it is. Sneak around behind the bear and find a tree close by that you can climb. Creep up and slap the bear on the rump. The startled bear will initially run away from you giving you time to run climb the nearby tree before the bear turns to pursue you. If it is a black bear it will climb the tree and eat you. If it is a grizzly bear it will push the tree over and eat you.

Since you are here typing this, you haven't put this theory to a test yet?


Wish I could have thought up this, I love it.


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Photographing in Bear and Cougar Country
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