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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 27 Mar 2014 (Thursday) 02:51
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EF Bayonet mount fatigued/breaking under stress of super-telephotos

 
Adharr
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Mar 27, 2014 02:51 |  #1
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Hello everyone! Over the weekend, I was shooting sports with my Canon 1D X and had it mounted to a 400mm f/2.8 IS II, handholding and sometimes using the monopod.

A friend was at the game, so I walked away for a minute to get a drink, and told him he could handhold it and shoot some photos if he wanted to. When I came back, I saw him holding the entire setup by the camera body alone while he was looking through the menus on the back of the camera! I jogged up to him to tell him not to hold the body and lens by the camera body alone, and to support the lens at all times so the bayonet mount doesn't deform or break.

My main worry was whether anyone had heard of this kind of treatment resulting in an actual EF mount on the camera or lens breaking, or warping so that lenses are loose or there are light leaks, or somewhere down the line I have a bayonet mount that needs replacement from fatigue. Any experiences or eyewitness accounts are appreciated.

I've heard some people say that the bayonet mounts are rock solid, both on the lens and the camera bodies, but I just wanted to hear from some people in here.


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Nick_Reading.UK
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Mar 27, 2014 02:54 |  #2

good question....


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ZoneV
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Mar 27, 2014 03:03 |  #3

I do lens mount conversions, and I am eager for knowledge.
So one day I set up an old Canon EOS 500n camera with my converted Canon FD 300/2.8L.
The lens weights 2.3kg. And it was no problem holding the assembly horizontal - only gripping the camera. This camera has a "cheap" plastic mount.

But a 400mm/2.8 weights more.
I sometimes had a Canon FD 400/2.8 (5.5kg) hanging down from my Canon EOS 5D camera. No problem with manual focussing a 58/1.2 or 85/1.2 lens widopen afterwards. Images are sharp where I have focussed.
This is probably not reccomended use, but my experiences are not bad.


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MalVeauX
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Mar 27, 2014 03:11 |  #4

Adharr wrote in post #16789638 (external link)
Hello everyone! Over the weekend, I was shooting sports with my Canon 1D X and had it mounted to a 400mm f/2.8 IS II, handholding and sometimes using the monopod.

A friend was at the game, so I walked away for a minute to get a drink, and told him he could handhold it and shoot some photos if he wanted to. When I came back, I saw him holding the entire setup by the camera body alone while he was looking through the menus on the back of the camera! I jogged up to him to tell him not to hold the body and lens by the camera body alone, and to support the lens at all times so the bayonet mount doesn't deform or break.

My main worry was whether anyone had heard of this kind of treatment resulting in an actual EF mount on the camera or lens breaking, or warping so that lenses are loose or there are light leaks, or somewhere down the line I have a bayonet mount that needs replacement from fatigue. Any experiences or eyewitness accounts are appreciated.

I've heard some people say that the bayonet mounts are rock solid, both on the lens and the camera bodies, but I just wanted to hear from some people in here.

Interesting to know.

But on a side note, while we wait for some poor soul who has bad news for you, if any, it goes to show that you better think twice about handing the keys to your house to someone and not leaving them a list of house rules!

Very best,


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FlyingPhotog
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Mar 27, 2014 03:36 |  #5

I set my rigs down on their hoods (1DMkIV + 300mm f/2.8L IS and 1DMkIV + 500mm f/4L IS) and pick them up by the body only on a regular basis without worry. I wouldn't hold them at an angle for long periods of time or waive them up and down by only the body, but picking them straight up, setting them straight down or holding them vertically while chimping is not an issue.


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Staszek
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Mar 27, 2014 03:59 |  #6

Damage comes from sudden jolts that cause the mounts to flex, such as falls of being hit by a football player on the sideline. I've carried my big lenses (300 2.8 - 600 4) by the body only for several years without issue or second thought.


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notastockpikr
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Mar 27, 2014 06:34 |  #7

I always have the lens strap on both my big lenses and would never pick them up without the camera strap and the lens strap around my neck. I'm the second owner of my Canon 500mm f/4 IS and the previous owner did handhold this lens. I need to replace the lens mount as it has some play from the weight of the lens when attached to any camera. My advice is to not baby the thing, but be mindful that there is some flex at the mount from the weight of these lenses.




  
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gasrocks
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Mar 27, 2014 08:09 |  #8

I often use big lenses, heavier than your 400. No issues. Canon made those mounts strong. I have never put a strap on a lens, only the body. Handholding or monopod use is fine.


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Luckless
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Mar 27, 2014 12:55 |  #9

Two points strongly suggest that it is really a non issue, assuming you're not doing something that would cause foolishly excessive forces to things.

1. Far larger and heavier pieces of equipment are frequently supported by similar materials with similarly sized mounts than camera lenses.

2. Even the manual for the 800mm lens does not specify additional cautions when handling. If picking it up by the body was an excessive risk to the camera or lens, then Canon would be all over it in their manuals just to cover themselves from potential lawsuits and claims of shoddy products.


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koala ­ yummies
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Mar 27, 2014 13:32 as a reply to  @ Luckless's post |  #10

If you are really concerned replacing the mount on the lens is pretty simple and straightforward with a good set of small (jeweler's) screwdrivers. The lens mounts generally cost around $30 from Canon (I was told last time I replaced a mount that the most expensive one is around $36) and they'll ship right to your home, the phone number for Canon parts USA is somewhere on this site. Replacing the mount on the camera body is a whole other story though.


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Mar 27, 2014 14:38 |  #11

I'm careful with the 500 mounted but will pick up the camera & lens by the body but shoot holding the lens.
I did have an accident where my 1D4 & 500/1.4x fell and broke the extender in half. No damage to the mount(s)


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Mar 27, 2014 15:09 |  #12

Adharr wrote in post #16789638 (external link)
My main worry was whether anyone had heard of this kind of treatment resulting in an actual EF mount on the camera or lens breaking, or warping so that lenses are loose or there are light leaks, or somewhere down the line I have a bayonet mount that needs replacement from fatigue. Any experiences or eyewitness accounts are appreciated.

I've heard some people say that the bayonet mounts are rock solid, both on the lens and the camera bodies, but I just wanted to hear from some people in here.

I use a 400 f2.8 IS as my main, everyday lens. The "old" IS version, which is much, much heavier than the new version 2. From much experience, I can say that regular, normal handling of such a heavy lens will and does cause the mounts to wear out, if you use it on an everyday basis. But it's really not a big deal. CPS will typically replace the mounts on both the lens and body - for free - as a regular part of the annual check & clean maintenance. Or you can just order new mounts and install them yourself - it only takes a couple minutes to swap 'em out. Just be sure to use Loctite on the threads of the screw when installing the new mounts.


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Sirrith
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Mar 27, 2014 20:15 |  #13

You don't have to worry about the mount itself:
https://pbs.twimg.com/​media/BfBuKeTCcAAIhlC.​jpg (external link)


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Mar 27, 2014 20:48 as a reply to  @ Sirrith's post |  #14

I'd assume your friend had the lens close to vertical.
In that scenario I can't imagine a 1200 5.6 stressing the mounts enough to be a worry. Force x no distance.
If you were in a foot pursuit with a 70-200 mounted, holding camera body with lens swinging around that's when force x distance could cause problems.


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vengence
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Mar 27, 2014 20:54 |  #15

Given most people have never heard of one breaking like that, even on the internet, I wouldn't worry about it too much.




  
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EF Bayonet mount fatigued/breaking under stress of super-telephotos
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