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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 30 Mar 2014 (Sunday) 13:14
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Poor First Shots

 
OhLook
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Mar 31, 2014 00:09 |  #16

Reservoir Dog wrote in post #16798028 (external link)
Or may be you didn't notice in the view finder, that your compensation exposure is way up to the right side, instead to be in the middle ;)

Exposure Compensation doesn't do anything in Manual.


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ThinMan
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Mar 31, 2014 04:59 |  #17

OhLook wrote in post #16798067 (external link)
ThinMan, it's easier to understand how the three elements work to create an exposure if you think about what they are, physically.

This explanation will sound elementary because it is. Please don't be offended.

When you press the button, the shutter opens and lets some light into the camera. The light hits the sensor in the back of the camera and makes a picture. If too much light comes in, the picture will be too full of light. It'll look washed out, like your scene of the barn and trees. If too little light comes in, the picture will be too dark and won't show anything.

Shutter speed is how long the shutter stays open. If it stays open a long time, more light goes to the sensor. The brighter your scene is, the faster you'll want the shutter to close. Human eyes work the same way. If you look at something too bright, like a flashlight shining in your eyes, you'll feel like closing your eyes because keeping them open longer lets in an uncomfortable amount of light.

1/60 second is too long for most ordinary shots in full daylight. It also allows blurred photos because human bodies don't hold still. Unless you use a tripod, you'll move a little before 1/60 second is up. Try briefer openings of the shutter, like 1/125 and 1/250, and see what you get.

Aperture is how wide the shutter opens. The shutter corresponds to the iris muscle of the human eye. In the dark, your irises withdraw outward from the center, making your pupils dilate to let in more light. Owls and other animals that hunt at night have great big pupils. An aperture setting of f/2 means the shutter exposes half of the lens area that it can. An aperture setting of f/4 means the shutter exposes one fourth of the lens area that it can. Aperture f/22 = 1/22 of the whole possible area is exposed; only a tiny hole is available for light to pass through. So the f/4.5 that you used for your barn scene let between 1/4 and 1/5 of the maximum possible light onto the sensor, and this was too much light. f/22 for the cat was too little light.

ISO is how sensitive the sensor is. A high number for ISO means it's more sensitive to light, like the retina of an imaginary person with superhuman vision who can see well in the dark. Most of the time, a high ISO isn't necessary. Pictures look better (smoother, less grainy) with low ISO. If there's enough light and you choose appropriate shutter and aperture settings, a normal ISO like 80 or 100 will work. Setting ISO on automatic is fine while you're learning the other settings.

Did you know that you can check a shot right after you take it? Your camera must be fancy enough to do that if it goes to f/22. Mine only goes to f/8 and I can look at a shot, make adjustments, and try again.

OK all that makes sense. But what about in the case of using a telephoto or zoom lens? How does the camera know I want to get a closer shot if its on auto? I want to eventually do macro photography so how does the camera determine how close you are? I have a 55-250mm lens but its not much as far as macro is concerned.




  
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sirquack
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Mar 31, 2014 07:44 |  #18

Thinman, the settings on the camera actually do nothing to impact focus, other than the depth of field. You still have to choose with the lens the focal length for each shot. So you have to twist the lens on the 55-250 to determine what amount of distance you want on the image. And you also will still have to focus, which for you is on the button you push to take the picture, so that is "kind of" automatic.
I know a lot of this sounds like mumbo jumbo at the moment, but as you learn more about what the camera can do, you will begin to understand what things you can change to get not just a good image, but a even a creatively good image.
If just takes time and is worth it without question when you take your first image and realize you made a good many of the decisions that make it look the way it does.


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Mar 31, 2014 07:57 |  #19

ya dslr can be a big learning curve from a point and shoot but once u get the basis of what does what and how to read a scene u will start taking better photos,I'm a totally newbie and the info i have learned on here from asking and reading and just looking at photos i like on here is so valuable,don't give up but as mentioned don't start in manual,try av or even program mode would be a good place to start,u can set up your dslr to start off like a point and shoot using auto and program mode prob the green square on your camera,the people on here are very good with help and very understanding so keep posting and keep practicing


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Mar 31, 2014 09:23 |  #20

I'm wondering if Auto focus (AF) for the lens was turned on?


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Martin ­ Dixon
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Mar 31, 2014 09:52 |  #21

" I want to eventually do macro photography"

This is a lot f fun, but is hard - 2 biggies: there isn't much light reflecting off a small object and the depth of field becomes razor thin if you use large apertures. You will probably need to use manual focus and move the camera to focus. I would advise buying a set of Kenco extension tubes (these have no glass in them) Attaching to your 55-250 will allow it to focus very close - the zoom will no longer behave as normal, but acts more like focus. You will have to take lots of shots to get the hang of it.


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Mar 31, 2014 13:02 |  #22

If grasping some of the basics is what's required - I highly recommend picking up Bryan Petersen's book "Understanding Exposure". Great resource that explains things in simple terms and will have you grasping the basics and them some in a short period of time.


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ThinMan
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Mar 31, 2014 16:56 |  #23

sirquack wrote in post #16798736 (external link)
Thinman, the settings on the camera actually do nothing to impact focus, other than the depth of field. You still have to choose with the lens the focal length for each shot. So you have to twist the lens on the 55-250 to determine what amount of distance you want on the image. And you also will still have to focus, which for you is on the button you push to take the picture, so that is "kind of" automatic.
I know a lot of this sounds like mumbo jumbo at the moment, but as you learn more about what the camera can do, you will begin to understand what things you can change to get not just a good image, but a even a creatively good image.
If just takes time and is worth it without question when you take your first image and realize you made a good many of the decisions that make it look the way it does.

Sadly I had to return that lens, damn it! But I found a great EF 28-90mm f4-5.6 macro for a pretty good price and it did not cost an arm and a leg.......




  
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Mar 31, 2014 16:57 |  #24

PhotosGuy wrote in post #16798867 (external link)
I'm wondering if Auto focus (AF) for the lens was turned on?

Yeah it was on.




  
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ThinMan
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Mar 31, 2014 16:59 |  #25

Martin Dixon wrote in post #16798909 (external link)
" I want to eventually do macro photography"

This is a lot f fun, but is hard - 2 biggies: there isn't much light reflecting off a small object and the depth of field becomes razor thin if you use large apertures. You will probably need to use manual focus and move the camera to focus. I would advise buying a set of Kenco extension tubes (these have no glass in them) Attaching to your 55-250 will allow it to focus very close - the zoom will no longer behave as normal, but acts more like focus. You will have to take lots of shots to get the hang of it.

Well like a I said in a previous post I had to return that 55-250mm and picked up a EF 28-90mm f4-5.6 macro.....What about a tripod? Regular or the short macro ones?

BigLobowski wrote in post #16799334 (external link)
If grasping some of the basics is what's required - I highly recommend picking up Bryan Petersen's book "Understanding Exposure". Great resource that explains things in simple terms and will have you grasping the basics and them some in a short period of time.

Thanks for that I will check it out.




  
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Mar 31, 2014 17:50 |  #26

Extension tubes will work on many lenses. I probably have too much stuff - just get to grips with your current lenses and camera for a good start.

Depends haow close you want to go but the 28-90 macro will get some good close-ups on its own.

+1 on Bryan Petersen's book "Understanding Exposure".


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Mar 31, 2014 18:26 |  #27

I will third Bryan Peterson's book. I had a pretty good understanding of basic exposure, but the book actually expanded my knowledge tremendously. And if you are a visual learner, you can look up Bryan on Adorama TV on youtube and see some quick hit lessons as well. He is quite an interesting guy as well as being a great teacher.


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Mar 31, 2014 21:43 |  #28

There is an exposure meter right in the center of the viewfinder directly under the image. No matter what aperture you choose you can adjust the shutter speed to get that meter right in the middle, which will give you a usable image. A small aperture (higher number) will give you a large depth of field (a lot of the image will be in focus) and a large aperture (lower number) will give you a very shallow depth of field. Simply set the aperture for what you wish to achieve in your photo and adjust the shutter to give you a centered exposure meter and you will be good! If you can't get the shutter speed an faster than 1/60th either put the camera on a tripod or up the ISO. Piece if cake!! LOL Sounds easy don't it? It actually is once you do it a few times....keep at it!


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Clean ­ Gene
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Apr 01, 2014 00:12 |  #29

OhLook wrote in post #16798327 (external link)
I thought those blades were the shutter. Has something relevant changed since the "iris in" and "iris out" (external link) of silent film?

If I got a technical point wrong, I'm not surprised. The main thing is, a wide opening lets in more light.

No, the blades form the iris.Think of the shutter more like the nuerological pathway from your eyes to your brain. Your eyes might be working perfectly, but if your brain can't receive the data then you still can't see. This is why you can press the depth-of-field-preview button without making an exposure. Press that button and the aperture (that is, the eye hole) closes, thus making the image in the viewfinder darker. But there's still no exposure, because the shutter is still closed. They're two different functions. One controls the eye, the other controls the brain. They're both incredibly important, but what you do doesn't amount to a hill of beans if the connection to the brain is lost (or in other words, if the shutter doesn't open).

Other than that, you've given an awesome explanation.




  
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Apr 01, 2014 00:20 |  #30

Clean Gene wrote in post #16800754 (external link)
This is why you can press the depth-of-field-preview button without making an exposure. Press that button and the aperture (that is, the eye hole) closes, thus making the image in the viewfinder darker.

I'm not familiar with this feature. No DSLR here, just a G.

Other than that, you've given an awesome explanation.

Thanks!


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