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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 30 Mar 2014 (Sunday) 13:14
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Poor First Shots

 
Woolburr
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Apr 06, 2014 13:34 |  #61

Lighten up gang. The OP came here seeking help and advice. There were a couple of good suggestions posted and there was a lot of unnecessary guff. If you don't have any constructive input, find a new place to play.

For the OP...try some of the suggestions that OhLook and Vetteography made. Post your results along with the shooting data and we will try to get you on the right track. Contrary to what some have posted, we were all new at this game once and I don't recognize any of the names or faces of the wise-crackers from any big gallery shows.


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kurrious
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Apr 06, 2014 14:42 |  #62

just wondering if the camera is in the back button focus mode ( bbf), easy enuff mistake for someone who isnt used to a new camera. just a stab in the dark ,as Im a newb too.


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DigitalDon
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Apr 06, 2014 14:42 as a reply to  @ post 16813704 |  #63

Hi ThinMan
I tried to send you a Private Message but you don't Private messaging turned on.



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CanonVsNikon
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Apr 06, 2014 19:18 |  #64
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ThinMan wrote in post #16813250 (external link)
Constructive criticism don't bother me so I guess you know me better than I do huh? Some here most likely complain that the color of their turds is not right.

You sound very defensive. Not sure what is going on with you.




  
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tmoore323
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Apr 06, 2014 20:33 |  #65

ThinMan wrote in post #16813250 (external link)
Constructive criticism don't bother me so I guess you know me better than I do huh? Some here most likely complain that the color of their turds is not right.

Mine turn greenish when I eat Fruity Pebbles, does this count?

You truly are a Troll, or can't take advice - I'm still on the fence on which - but you did hit 5 pages!




  
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ThinMan
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Apr 07, 2014 17:41 |  #66

tmoore323 wrote in post #16814689 (external link)
Mine turn greenish when I eat Fruity Pebbles, does this count?

You truly are a Troll, or can't take advice - I'm still on the fence on which - but you did hit 5 pages!

Short piers are made for long walks take one.




  
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OhLook
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Apr 07, 2014 18:41 |  #67

ThinMan wrote in post #16816916 (external link)
Short piers are made for long walks take one.

If you respond to hostile posts by getting hostile yourself, the well-meaning people who've been willing to help you with technical issues won't stay so willing to donate their time anymore. Me, for example.


PRONOUN ADVISORY: OhLook is a she. | A FEW CORRECT SPELLINGS: lens, aperture, amateur, hobbyist, per se, raccoon, whoa, more so (2 wds.), shoo-in | IMAGE EDITING OK

  
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dbeugel
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Apr 07, 2014 18:42 |  #68

ThinMan wrote in post #16797054 (external link)
As a side note I took a picture of my cat same everything as above except I used ISO 400 and f/22 this was indoors and all I got was a black box with no picture!!

See here's what sways me to think this is all a wind up! You obviously understand ISO and Aperture hence selecting it in manual yet took the time to roll the aperture all the way to f/22 to take a shot indoors of your cat. :lol:


I own a DSLR, some lenses and some lights.

  
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kfreels
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Apr 07, 2014 23:37 |  #69

Josh_30 wrote in post #16798260 (external link)
I mostly agree with the above explanation, with the exception of the "shutter" opening wider as an explanation of aperture. The shutter (the flap that covers the sensor) always opens the same amount, to completely expose the full sensor area.

This is wrong. The shutter is a focal plane shutter with a front and rear curtain. The front curtain opens then the rear curtain slams shut. As the shutter speed increases, the time between the two shrinks. At around the flash sync speed the rear curtain begins to close before the front curtain has fully traversed the sensor. At higher speeds this results in little more than a small slit sliding across the sensor. Here's a nifty video in slow motion. https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=ptfSW4eW25g (external link)

Josh_30 wrote in post #16798260 (external link)
For now, my advice is to start on green box or "P" mode, and read some about the exposure triangle and basic DSLR shooting techniques. YouTube is a great resource as well. It won't be long before you're moving up to Av, Tv, or M modes as needed.

Despite that correction, this is good advice. Photography isn't "easy". If it were, everyone would be a great photographer. It takes years to develop the skills to be great but that doesn't mean you can't get great photos along the way. Practice and experimentation are what it's all about. One of the greatest things about photography is the learning and mastering of new techniques. There's always something new to learn no matter how long you've been doing it!

Josh_30 wrote in post #16798260 (external link)
What's the purpose of manual, you ask? Once you know what you're doing, and want something different than what the camera automatically calculates for you, then you can override what the camera thinks is best and use your own creativity to purposely over or underexpose a shot (from the camera's point of view) for a desired result. Once you learn how the camera "sees" you'll be able to anticipate what it's going to give you as an exposure, and from there you can tweak things up or down. You can also use manual mode to "lock in" an exposure so it doesn't change, which is useful in situations like shooting panoramas, or composites where you'll want your exposures to match later on in photoshop.

Right on the money here. Manual is there for people who know better than the computer what they want their settings to be. But it takes time to get smarter than the computer. Even then, we often still rely on the computer in certain situations because the computer is still faster than our brains and our ability to make settings changes. Sometimes we want the computer to do most of the work but we still want a little control so we'll choose modes like Av and Tv.


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pwm2
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Apr 08, 2014 00:47 |  #70

OhLook wrote in post #16817043 (external link)
If you respond to non-hostile posts by getting hostile yourself, the well-meaning people who've been willing to help you with technical issues won't stay so willing to donate their time anymore.

I corrected it for you.


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CanonVsNikon
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Apr 08, 2014 08:27 |  #71
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Shooting manual for the sake of shooting manual is not the correct way of doing it. If you shoot manual to only zero out the meter than there is no reason to shoot manual.




  
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OkieGentleman
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Apr 08, 2014 20:55 |  #72

I am not trying to be tacky. I am trying to be helpful.

Download a copy of the manual for your camera from the internet. Put it into a three ring binder and get some high liters. Start on page one and READ everything about the camera controls with the camera in you lap, while you do so and examine the camera as you read about each control. High lite the areas as you read thru them, make notes in the margin.and DO NOT SKIP A PAGE. If you hit something that is not clear, go to the internet for clarification. This will take several evenings to work your way through all the controls and what they do. You will want to save this as a reference book to refresh your memory every few months or just before you go some place and you know you are going to take photos. Keep the small manual that came with the camera in the camera bag. Get a nice note book to keep notes about what you shot and where. All kinds of information is stored with the information that makes the photograph.

Yes it is a bit of a pain, but when you are done working you way thru the manual, you will know about 5 times a much as the average person that may have owned that model camera for years.

Also cameras are as bad as automobiles with placement of some controls, so when picking up a different model some controls will be in a different spot. But you will be happily surprised at how much of it you recognize and understand what it does.

Taking photographs is like playing golf, you have to study the game. You will never play a perfect game, but you will make a hole-in-one every now and then.

The local colleges have short evening classes on photography if you want to know more.




  
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DigitalDon
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Apr 08, 2014 21:38 |  #73

OkieGentleman wrote in post #16820234 (external link)
I am not trying to be tacky. I am trying to be helpful.

Download a copy of the manual for your camera from the internet. Put it into a three ring binder and get some high liters. Start on page one and READ everything about the camera controls with the camera in you lap, while you do so and examine the camera as you read about each control. High lite the areas as you read thru them, make notes in the margin.and DO NOT SKIP A PAGE. If you hit something that is not clear, go to the internet for clarification. This will take several evenings to work your way through all the controls and what they do. You will want to save this as a reference book to refresh your memory every few months or just before you go some place and you know you are going to take photos. Keep the small manual that came with the camera in the camera bag. Get a nice note book to keep notes about what you shot and where. All kinds of information is stored with the information that makes the photograph.

Yes it is a bit of a pain, but when you are done working you way thru the manual, you will know about 5 times a much as the average person that may have owned that model camera for years.

Also cameras are as bad as automobiles with placement of some controls, so when picking up a different model some controls will be in a different spot. But you will be happily surprised at how much of it you recognize and understand what it does.

Taking photographs is like playing golf, you have to study the game. You will never play a perfect game, but you will make a hole-in-one every now and then.

The local colleges have short evening classes on photography if you want to know more.

Thanks OkieGentleman
The larger type is soothing to my eyes, I have to view my laptop zoomed to 125% , at 100% view, the type looks like fine print on a contract to me and at 125% it is still a strain, but what you wrote and my still viewing at 125% is perfect with no eye strain at all.
Thanks I think you just solved another one of my problems, My eye sight is hendering me from learning also.



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hiketheplanet
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Apr 16, 2014 00:12 |  #74

Numenorean wrote in post #16835244 (external link)
I nearly always shoot manual. Very rarely where I don't.

You typically aren't going to start learning by shooting manual. I'd recommend Shutter Priority or Aperture Priority if you want a little control, but Green Box it if you're having a hard time getting good shots. Learn exposure by looking at what the camera chooses. But the camera will not always be correct in what it chooses depending on the scene, metering mode, etc.

Get a book and read also - Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is a good start.

I'm with you on shooting Manual exclusively. With a little button customization and the option of auto ISO (with a reasonable cap set) makes Av/Tv no *easier* to properly expose. One thing I've been working in lately is utilizing the different metering modes, but I tend to meter on a lightest/darkest area and take an educated guess by adjusting shutter speed/ISO. I dont find myself changing aperture much as I have a good idea of what aperture I want going into a situation (usually wide open for indoors/selective focus, or stopped down to f/8-f/11 for landscapes).

That little bar on the meter in your viewfinder is invaluable. I do second all the notions here about reading up on the "exposure triangle." It's really easy to get a basic understanding of it, and thats enough to get you started playing around in manual or Av/Tv. Sure there's lots of other areas of photography to learn too, some complicated, some not. It's definitely a discovery process. Everytime I go out to shoot, I learn something. I go home, I read something, go out and try to apply it whenever I can. Most of the time I throw all of my shots away, but I don't care, I had a damn good time getting those shots. Every once in awhile, I get a shot I like. Thats how it goes.

Theres all different kinds of photography too! Each genre presents its own challenges. I find that fascinating. I've pidgin-holed myself a bit into landscapes, but its what makes my jaw drop when I see an awesome landscape shot online or elsewhere. Plus I'm intrigued by the locations and how the photographer got to that spot, and what the struggle was to get the shot. And even though I think I suck, I love that I can also go out on a similar journey. Some people would rather be fishing, I'd rather be posted up in the mountains, on some scenic perch fiddling with my camera gear. Even if I blow the shoot, I had fun, and I will learn from my mistakes and maybe have a new trick added to my bag.




  
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genesimmons
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Apr 16, 2014 06:48 |  #75

pwm2 wrote in post #16817830 (external link)
I corrected it for you.

i don't think it needed to be corrected,i believe he was stating u won't get replies if u respond hostile to the hostile responses,the op hasn't responded hostile to the good replies only the ignorant ones,the post didn't need to be corrected,the guy had it right.


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Poor First Shots
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