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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 11 Apr 2014 (Friday) 13:37
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Finally detaching myself from taking "technically perfect" shots

 
xravexboix
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Apr 11, 2014 13:37 |  #1

IMAGE: http://thejeffchangexperience.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/IMG_1329-1024x682.jpg

IMAGE: http://thejeffchangexperience.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/IMG_2249-682x1024.jpg



Thoughts?

I started by doing static automatic photography. In that respect, it was usually about obtaining the right DOF and bokeh. Composition took a back seat and artistic expression was non-existent. To be clear, in no way am I saying was taking technically perfect shots, but that was my goal-- haha.

Now, I'm on my third Canon body and moved on to people and capturing the moment. It's much more fun.

Thank you

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theantiquetiger
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Apr 11, 2014 13:47 |  #2

Both great shots!!!

Like my saying, "Just because everyone eats McDonald's, doesn't make it gourmet, shoot what you like!"

I know you said you are trying to getting away from "the perfect" image", but still keep it in mind. #2 has a couple things that bother me, his dead center frame position, cropped off foot, and tilt of the pole.

#1 is amazing, don't change a thing.


(BTW, is that Brenda Song in #1?)


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xravexboix
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Apr 11, 2014 13:54 |  #3

theantiquetiger wrote in post #16826670 (external link)
Both great shots!!!

Like my saying, "Just because everyone eats McDonald's, doesn't make it gourmet, shoot what you like!"

I know you said you are trying to getting away from "the perfect" image", but still keep it in mind. #2 has a couple things that bother me, his dead center frame position, cropped off foot, and tilt of the pole.

#1 is amazing, don't change a thing.


(BTW, is that Brenda Song in #1?)

Thank you :D

Yea, #2 has a few things. The cropped out foot and I should've been a step over to my right to capture the full word up top. That would've also fixed the dead center staging haha.

#1 is an Australian model that was here a few weeks back at a shoot with Steve Bitanga @ Illest store in Costa Mesa. Rosie Ly. She told me to do some behind the scenes. Done and done :)


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planet5D
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Apr 11, 2014 16:38 |  #4

theantiquetiger wrote in post #16826670 (external link)
#1 is amazing, don't change a thing.

Will disagree with you in that the entire left side of the image can be cropped and her face is dead center (same complaint you had about #2 ;)


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thedcmule2
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Apr 11, 2014 17:12 |  #5

Detaching yourself from taking technically perfect shots is a bad idea. In these two examples they didn't help you at all, you are still left with very dull, static images where the subjects are dead center and the balance is off. So if your goal was to be artistic and have stronger composition, I can't say you achieved this.

What you should be aiming for is technically perfect AND well composed shots. With practice the technicalities become second-hand and you can focus on composition. You should not sacrifice one for the other.




  
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xravexboix
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Apr 11, 2014 19:05 |  #6

planet5D wrote in post #16827000 (external link)
Will disagree with you in that the entire left side of the image can be cropped and her face is dead center (same complaint you had about #2 ;)

I actually only crop photos if they need to be sized to fit something. If I were to crop it, should I stick to a specific aspect ratio or freely crop to whatever may look best ?


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xravexboix
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Apr 11, 2014 19:09 |  #7

thedcmule2 wrote in post #16827063 (external link)
Detaching yourself from taking technically perfect shots is a bad idea. In these two examples they didn't help you at all, you are still left with very dull, static images where the subjects are dead center and the balance is off. So if your goal was to be artistic and have stronger composition, I can't say you achieved this.

What you should be aiming for is technically perfect AND well composed shots. With practice the technicalities become second-hand and you can focus on composition. You should not sacrifice one for the other.

I meant in context of redoing shoots until I get the desired outcome. The BW was a somewhat staged photo but he wanted to pose in the Osaka smoker squat instead. I can see where the composition goes wrong in that one. In the color photo, how would you crop it to give it more life?


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thedcmule2
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Apr 11, 2014 19:40 |  #8

I would not have cropped it at all, but if I was forced to use that angle with the model staring in that exact direction (im assuming shes looking at a mirror), I would recompose and position her on the left hand side of the frame and give her eyes space to look into, and I would also angle the camera down so there isn't so much space above her head (it's almost 1/3 of the photo worth of negative space).

By doing this, you remove the distracting black blob on the bottom left corner along with the slit of window at the edge that's not helping the picture at all. It also lets us see more of the store inside, perhaps more sneakers, clothes and skate decks. Then, we'll know exactly where she is, and we can see more of the environment shes in. Photography is the art of limitation, remove what isn't useful and add what detail is. Ask yourself if that entire left hand side of the photo is helping at all. That is how you step away from only focusing on technicalities and start focusing on creating strong moods in your work. Good luck.




  
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xravexboix
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Apr 11, 2014 20:32 |  #9

thedcmule2 wrote in post #16827285 (external link)
I would not have cropped it at all, but if I was forced to use that angle with the model staring in that exact direction (im assuming shes looking at a mirror), I would recompose and position her on the left hand side of the frame and give her eyes space to look into, and I would also angle the camera down so there isn't so much space above her head (it's almost 1/3 of the photo worth of negative space).

By doing this, you remove the distracting black blob on the bottom left corner along with the slit of window at the edge that's not helping the picture at all. It also lets us see more of the store inside, perhaps more sneakers, clothes and skate decks. Then, we'll know exactly where she is, and we can see more of the environment shes in. Photography is the art of limitation, remove what isn't useful and add what detail is. Ask yourself if that entire left hand side of the photo is helping at all. That is how you step away from only focusing on technicalities and start focusing on creating strong moods in your work. Good luck.

Got it. I'll take note as I have a shoot on Sunday and keep these things in mind. My mind is still locked in a virtual point and shoot cycle as that was all "event coverage" photography in relations to cars was for me. Have to shift gears when photographing people-- Thank you.


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theantiquetiger
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Apr 11, 2014 22:28 |  #10

planet5D wrote in post #16827000 (external link)
Will disagree with you in that the entire left side of the image can be cropped and her face is dead center (same complaint you had about #2 ;)

You and your rule of thirds! I feel the image works very well with her in the center because of all the stuff in the BG. It works in this image. Actually, in the second image, his face falls right on the cross hairs of the RoT's, but it still doesn't work. RoT's is a very good rule to follow when starting out, keeping your images well composed, but the rule is not set in stone.


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planet5D
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Apr 12, 2014 07:51 |  #11

theantiquetiger wrote in post #16827560 (external link)
You and your rule of thirds! I feel the image works very well with her in the center because of all the stuff in the BG. It works in this image. Actually, in the second image, his face falls right on the cross hairs of the RoT's, but it still doesn't work. RoT's is a very good rule to follow when starting out, keeping your images well composed, but the rule is not set in stone.

I agree that the rule should not be set in stone - but the vast majority of the time it works and it works for pros as well as those starting out.

for the first image, please tell me what is redeeming about the blank white wide pillar on the left.. and the black bag in the bottom of the frame and the little protrusion of the counter... those things are useless to tell the story of this young lady and in fact, they detract a whole bunch.

Sure, the stuff to image right tells a big part of the story and is valuable, but the left is just a total distraction.


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planet5D
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Apr 12, 2014 07:52 |  #12

thedcmule2 wrote in post #16827063 (external link)
Detaching yourself from taking technically perfect shots is a bad idea. In these two examples they didn't help you at all, you are still left with very dull, static images where the subjects are dead center and the balance is off. So if your goal was to be artistic and have stronger composition, I can't say you achieved this.

What you should be aiming for is technically perfect AND well composed shots. With practice the technicalities become second-hand and you can focus on composition. You should not sacrifice one for the other.

AMEN!


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Bianchi
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Apr 12, 2014 09:46 |  #13

Nothing to comment about, as you achieved your goal, as neither are "technically perfect"


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breal101
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Apr 12, 2014 10:24 |  #14

thedcmule2 wrote in post #16827063 (external link)
Detaching yourself from taking technically perfect shots is a bad idea. In these two examples they didn't help you at all, you are still left with very dull, static images where the subjects are dead center and the balance is off. So if your goal was to be artistic and have stronger composition, I can't say you achieved this.

What you should be aiming for is technically perfect AND well composed shots. With practice the technicalities become second-hand and you can focus on composition. You should not sacrifice one for the other.

I couldn't disagree more. You would tell Earnst Haas to shoot at a faster shutter speed so the bullfighter pictures showed no motion blur? Then they would be just another pic of a bullfighter.

Same here the OP achieved what he wanted to, something different. I like #1, the background lines support the center composition.


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thedcmule2
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Apr 12, 2014 10:48 |  #15

breal101 wrote in post #16828297 (external link)
I couldn't disagree more. You would tell Earnst Haas to shoot at a faster shutter speed so the bullfighter pictures showed no motion blur? Then they would be just another pic of a bullfighter.

Shutter speed is a completely personal and creative choice. Did I ever say no motion blur was technically correct thing to do? NOPE! You are disagreeing with something I never even said or implied.

breal101 wrote in post #16828297 (external link)
something different.

Not really. Let's stop sugar coating it.




  
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Finally detaching myself from taking "technically perfect" shots
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