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Thread started 14 Apr 2014 (Monday) 11:01
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Destination Weddings to Canada and the Law

 
banquetbear
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Apr 15, 2014 14:40 |  #16

neacail wrote in post #16835896 (external link)
I would argue that a wedding photographer and/or videographer is in the media industry, though clearly not a part of a news crew.

The first point deals with media crews that are travelling with reporters, and I feel the second point is quote ambiguous.

The definition of "media" is very broad, and without the Government of Canada clearly defining what the definition of "media" is in the context they're using it, I feel the points listed are ultimately inconclusive: there appears to be "wiggle" room depending on the spin.

...when you are sitting in a tiny room being grilled by immigration officials there isn't "wiggle" room for spin. Spinning legal matters is really silly advice. A wedding photographer is not media. You can "argue" as much as you like that they are: but you will look very silly as you are turned around at the border and miss the wedding you were booked to shoot.


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Apr 15, 2014 14:46 |  #17

cory1848 wrote in post #16835931 (external link)
I would argue that a photographer traveling to Canada to shoot a wedding is in fact entering the labor market. They aren't shooting it for fun, they are shooting to make money. Money that a local could be making. Should the B&G be allowed to bring in their own catering company to serve food? DJ to play music? Officiant to marry them?

I don't think that bringing in a catering company would be logistically possible, but if it was, and the catering company had the required permits and access to kitchen facilities, I see no problem with it. I see no problem with bringing in a DJ: providing all of the paperwork was in order. The officiant could be tricky, but I have nothing against the idea.

I live in the land of "milk and honey" as far as Canada goes. This could colour my perspective a bit.


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neacail
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Apr 15, 2014 14:47 |  #18

banquetbear wrote in post #16836041 (external link)
...when you are sitting in a tiny room being grilled by immigration officials there isn't "wiggle" room for spin. Spinning legal matters is really silly advice. A wedding photographer is not media. You can "argue" as much as you like that they are: but you will look very silly as you are turned around at the border and miss the wedding you were booked to shoot.

Me? I'm a Canadian who lives in Canada. The situation being discussed doesn't apply to me.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:11 |  #19

neacail wrote in post #16836060 (external link)
I don't think that bringing in a catering company would be logistically possible, but if it was, and the catering company had the required permits and access to kitchen facilities, I see no problem with it. I see no problem with bringing in a DJ: providing all of the paperwork was in order. The officiant could be tricky, but I have nothing against the idea.

I live in the land of "milk and honey" as far as Canada goes. This could colour my perspective a bit.

"providing all ofthe proper paperwork was in order"

This is what we are talking about, a photographer entering the country, working a wedding and not "worrying" about the paperwork or permits. All I am saying to do whatever one can to make it legal, and if you can't, then don't take the job.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:12 |  #20

neacail wrote in post #16836061 (external link)
Me? I'm a Canadian who lives in Canada. The situation being discussed doesn't apply to me.

...which is precisely why you shouldn't be offering such silly advice on a message board.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:17 |  #21

banquetbear wrote in post #16836123 (external link)
...which is precisely why you shouldn't be offering such silly advice on a message board.

I haven't offered a single iota of advice in this thread. I've provided a link, a possible interpretation of it, and I've had a couple of friendly debates about the contents of said link. Perhaps you should re-read what I've posted.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:20 |  #22

cory1848 wrote in post #16836120 (external link)
"providing all ofthe proper paperwork was in order"

This is what we are talking about, a photographer entering the country, working a wedding and not "worrying" about the paperwork or permits. All I am saying to do whatever one can to make it legal, and if you can't, then don't take the job.

My apologies. My interpretation of the contents of the thread is a bit different from yours.

If permits are required, they should certainly be acquired. I'm under the impression that permits are generally quite easy to get in most situations, as we bring people up from the US every fall to work in the oil patch.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:29 |  #23

neacail wrote in post #16836138 (external link)
I haven't offered a single iota of advice in this thread. I've provided a link, a possible interpretation of it, and I've had a couple of friendly debates about the contents of said link. Perhaps you should re-read what I've posted.

neacail wrote in post #16835896 (external link)
I would argue that a wedding photographer and/or videographer is in the media industry, though clearly not a part of a news crew.

The first point deals with media crews that are travelling with reporters, and I feel the second point is quote ambiguous.

The definition of "media" is very broad, and without the Government of Canada clearly defining what the definition of "media" is in the context they're using it, I feel the points listed are ultimately inconclusive: there appears to be "wiggle" room depending on the spin.

...you don't want to call that advice? Lets just call it silly speculation based on silly assumptions. If anyone were to take your speculation seriously they would get themselves into trouble. Which is all fine and good because it "doesn't apply to you." But that is a really selfish attitude. The appropriate links on how to legally get permission to shoot in Canada have been provided by others in this thread. It would also be recommended that people approach the correct authorities/experts for their opinion. They shouldn't just try and spin things when they get to the border.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:38 |  #24

neacail wrote in post #16836143 (external link)
My apologies. My interpretation of the contents of the thread is a bit different from yours.

If permits are required, they should certainly be acquired. I'm under the impression that permits are generally quite easy to get in most situations, as we bring people up from the US every fall to work in the oil patch.

They are easy, and they aren't easy. It all depends on the industry, how large your company is, who they know, and what the skilled labour force in the region is.

If you can prove to the relevant government agencies that local Canadians are unable to meet your demands on numbers of employees and skill/experience level, then you are granted your work permits to bring them in. However if you are trying to hire someone to do something that is very common and there are lots of local workers willing to take the job, then the application is supposed to be denied.

There can be some leeway for something like a photographer in instances where they are part of an ongoing project that is being done in multiple locations, and a work permit can be granted in those cases, but either way you still need to apply and be granted a work permit.

Fill out your paperwork, and hope for the best.


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Apr 15, 2014 15:42 |  #25

banquetbear wrote in post #16836164 (external link)
...you don't want to call that advice? Lets just call it silly speculation based on silly assumptions.

It most certainly was not advice, and I made no assumptions. I clearly stated that the portion I referenced "may" apply. It might, or it might not. I'm quite surprised that you're interpreting the posts the way you are.

Nonetheless, this is the second thread where I feel you've responded to me in a rather venomous fashion. I would greatly appreciate it if you dialed things back just a touch.


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Apr 15, 2014 16:02 |  #26

neacail wrote in post #16836186 (external link)
It most certainly was not advice, and I made no assumptions. I clearly stated that the portion I referenced "may" apply. It might, or it might not. I'm quite surprised that you're interpreting the posts the way you are.

Nonetheless, this is the second thread where I feel you've responded to me in a rather venomous fashion. I would greatly appreciate it if you dialed things back just a touch.

...I'm replying to your posts: not to you. Don't take my words personally. I don't respond to user names and don't even know what thread you are talking about.

Its simply that your "not-advice" is dangerous "not-advice": especially in a thread where someone was asking for advice.


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Apr 15, 2014 16:11 |  #27

Luckless wrote in post #16833592 (external link)
The Canadian Border Services Agency takes entry into the country very seriously, and they have been stepping up inspections and whatnot in the last several years. Some of the agents are very good at what they do when it comes to questioning people and spotting triggers. Don't try to cross the border to work without the proper paperwork, and don't bring work related gear with you even if you're just visiting.

Car2n wrote in post #16833695 (external link)
There was television show just the other night. Border Security. An American photographer was trying to enter British Columbia. The border guards determined that the photographer had intentions of doing paid shoots. He did not have a work visa and was denied entry and had to return to the US.

banquetbear wrote in post #16836041 (external link)
...when you are sitting in a tiny room being grilled by immigration officials there isn't "wiggle" room for spin.

The debate can rage on, but what really matters is once you try to cross the border.

Would you want to take your chances without the proper paperwork?


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Apr 15, 2014 16:11 |  #28

Wow I am almost sorry I copied that text about media into my original post

I did not mean to insinuate that a wedding photog is media or news, rather just to illustrate that some photographers are exempt, and that you need to call to confirm if you fall into a category which is exempt or not.

Sorry for the way I worded my original post, never meant for it to derail the OP's original question

Have your friend contact CIC or the US Consulate General in their area and get the only answer that matters - the Official one.


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Apr 15, 2014 16:44 |  #29

greazyjungle wrote in post #16835989 (external link)
I'm not sure why this is so confusing; "photographer" is not on this list...:

http://www.cic.gc.ca …/apply-who-nopermit.asp#p (external link)

Just because you aren't getting the answer you want to hear doesn't make the answer any less valid.

Take the advice of the dozen or so people who have responded with the suggestion that you call the appropriate authorities in Canada...

There isn't an answer "I want to hear." I don't shoot weddings and don't plan to any time soon (if I did, I have no interest in doing them out of country.) I just want to know the law and acknowledged that calling is probably the only way to find out for sure.


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Apr 15, 2014 16:47 |  #30

cory1848 wrote in post #16835931 (external link)
I would argue that a photographer traveling to Canada to shoot a wedding is in fact entering the labor market. They aren't shooting it for fun, they are shooting to make money. Money that a local could be making. Should the B&G be allowed to bring in their own catering company to serve food? DJ to play music? Officiant to marry them?

You can't bring your own minister either? OK, not taking your word for it, but hope to find more facts on this. Thanks.


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