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Thread started 14 Apr 2014 (Monday) 11:01
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Destination Weddings to Canada and the Law

 
MattPharmD
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Apr 15, 2014 18:24 |  #31

YankeeMom wrote in post #16836374 (external link)
You can't bring your own minister either? OK, not taking your word for it, but hope to find more facts on this. Thanks.

I would say that this is less likely than not being able to bring a photographer. The minister is still working in Canada, but isn't taking away from Canadian jobs as there is probably a specific reason you are bringing a minister. For example, a Canadian minister might not be able to sign a marriage certificate for your state. Thus, I imagine it would be fairly easy for the minister to get a temporary work visa for Canada. Also, technically a minister might not be "working" as many do weddings for free for their congregation or do it in exchange for a donation to the church. In this case they might not be different than the other members of your wedding party.

I would say that a couple "could" be allowed to bring anyone they wanted; Photographer, DJ, caterer, videographer, etc. However, they would be working in Canada, require a visa and Canada would not be obligated to issue such a VISA. This is about the laws of the place you are going and not what you think is reasonable. It is also about if you are willing to risk the consequences of not getting a VISA (e.g. your photographer getting stopped at the border or deported).


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cory1848
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Apr 15, 2014 19:38 |  #32

YankeeMom wrote in post #16836374 (external link)
You can't bring your own minister either? OK, not taking your word for it, but hope to find more facts on this. Thanks.

You missed the point I was trying to make. I hope you don't take anyones word for it but rather verify yourself by the links provided or calling the embassy. The only "facts" are the ones that Canada provides and you have to go to the source for that. Doesn't seem like you want to do that though.


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cory1848
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Apr 15, 2014 19:40 |  #33

MattPharmD wrote in post #16836618 (external link)
I would say that this is less likely than not being able to bring a photographer. The minister is still working in Canada, but isn't taking away from Canadian jobs as there is probably a specific reason you are bringing a minister. For example, a Canadian minister might not be able to sign a marriage certificate for your state. Thus, I imagine it would be fairly easy for the minister to get a temporary work visa for Canada. Also, technically a minister might not be "working" as many do weddings for free for their congregation or do it in exchange for a donation to the church. In this case they might not be different than the other members of your wedding party.

I would say that a couple "could" be allowed to bring anyone they wanted; Photographer, DJ, caterer, videographer, etc. However, they would be working in Canada, require a visa and Canada would not be obligated to issue such a VISA. This is about the laws of the place you are going and not what you think is reasonable. It is also about if you are willing to risk the consequences of not getting a VISA (e.g. your photographer getting stopped at the border or deported).

Does Canada not have religion? I was being a little sarcastic when I said the Officiant part but now that I think about it, what is so special that a Canadian minister or officiant couldn't do that would require one to be flown in from the US?


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Apr 16, 2014 01:48 |  #34

YankeeMom wrote in post #16835428 (external link)
Dan, the info. in those links indicate the regulations for being a Canadian employee. I am talking about American photographers NOT employed by a Canadian/in Canada. Where are you getting the information in your post?

And I am talking about exactly the same people - foreigners who don't have a work permit and travel to a country and work (regardless of how long for or for who) are doing so illegally.

I'm getting my information from Canadian government, specifically the immigration dept.


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fontanka
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Apr 16, 2014 02:53 |  #35

cory1848 wrote in post #16835490 (external link)
It works similarly in the States working from state to state. You live in NH, if you want to work in MA, then you must apply for the proper MA permit and pay appropriate taxes in MA. Even though you are not a MA resident.

What are you talking about!? This is complete absurd.
Have you ever filed taxes in US?


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MattPharmD
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Apr 16, 2014 06:31 |  #36

cory1848 wrote in post #16836813 (external link)
Does Canada not have religion? I was being a little sarcastic when I said the Officiant part but now that I think about it, what is so special that a Canadian minister or officiant couldn't do that would require one to be flown in from the US?

First, Some states have requirements on who can sign a marriage certificate and it be valid. So, unless you want to be "legally" married and "ceremonially" married by two different people you have to follow those rules.

Second, not all faiths have international equivalents. Where a canadian DJ, caterer, or photographer might be able to do the same job as an american counterpart, a minister is more likely to be irreplaceable. It's also possible they could be more of a participant than someone working (the bridesmaids don't require work VISAs for example).


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tickerguy
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Apr 16, 2014 07:23 |  #37

You guys are amusing, really.

A sovereign nation does not have to let you in. You're a guest in that nation, and it's their discretion as to whether you may enter or not, and if so on what terms.

MOST countries have rather-strict rules on who may work within their borders. The United States claims to have them but the fact that millions of illegal Mexicans come here and work unmolested doesn't change this; it simply means that their employers successfully BRIBED Congress and the Executive to prevent prosecution of both the workers and themselves. What they are doing, and the workers are doing, remains illegal.

The correct way to work in a foreign nation is always to apply for a visa to do so and present whatever documentation they wish sufficiently far in advance along with whatever fee is required. You will either be given an approval or a denial. If you're approved then you are, and you may work there.

If you attempt to cross the border under false pretense you're risking arrest and prosecution at the outside, although what usually happens is that you're refused entry and black-balled by the nation in question for some period of time, which may be permanent. Again this is at their discretion.

What part of a nation being sovereign do you have a problem with and exactly why is it that you think you're so special as to be able to march in and demand that a foreign government allow you to do what you want, rather than asking permission to undertake an action on THEIR soil while respecting THEIR sovereignty?


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cory1848
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Apr 16, 2014 07:54 |  #38

fontanka wrote in post #16837478 (external link)
What are you talking about!? This is complete absurd.
Have you ever filed taxes in US?

Yes and I have even worked in MA when I was younger. Please educate me why it is so absurd. If you live in one state while working in another, each state wants it share. It is pretty common. Similarly with work permits.


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cory1848
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Apr 16, 2014 08:03 |  #39

MattPharmD wrote in post #16837663 (external link)
First, Some states have requirements on who can sign a marriage certificate and it be valid. So, unless you want to be "legally" married and "ceremonially" married by two different people you have to follow those rules.

Second, not all faiths have international equivalents. Where a canadian DJ, caterer, or photographer might be able to do the same job as an american counterpart, a minister is more likely to be irreplaceable. It's also possible they could be more of a participant than someone working (the bridesmaids don't require work VISAs for example).

I just find it highly unlikely a couple would pay to have their minister travel to a foreign country to perform a ceremony. Maybe if they are very well off but unlikely at best.

I see your point though with the minister. I probably shouldn't have used the officiant as an example.


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Hogloff
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Apr 16, 2014 08:21 |  #40
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neacail wrote in post #16836143 (external link)
My apologies. My interpretation of the contents of the thread is a bit different from yours.

If permits are required, they should certainly be acquired. I'm under the impression that permits are generally quite easy to get in most situations, as we bring people up from the US every fall to work in the oil patch.

Permits are not very easy to get and we utilize a labour lawyer when we try to send people to work in the US or bring people from the US to work in Canada.

Now these people we try to get to work in the different countries are part of our company...it just takes a lot of paper work and basically proof that a US / Canadian cannot do the job in their own country.

This is work to do on our own proprietary equipment. A general job like shooting a wedding will be much harder to prove that no one in Canada is qualified to shoot that wedding.




  
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Apr 16, 2014 08:33 |  #41

To the OP - Do you have any intention of calling an official source for the correct answer? Or are you content to allow the debate here to go on endlessly?


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cory1848
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Apr 16, 2014 08:51 |  #42

jwhite65 wrote in post #16837850 (external link)
To the OP - Do you have any intention of calling an official source for the correct answer? Or are you content to allow the debate here to go on endlessly?

What....you don't like a good debate? :razz:


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YankeeMom
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Apr 16, 2014 09:04 |  #43

fontanka wrote in post #16837478 (external link)
What are you talking about!? This is complete absurd.
Have you ever filed taxes in US?

Again, if I am employed and paid in NH, but take some photos in MA, I do not have to apply for any forms or pay taxes to MA.

tickerguy wrote in post #16837741 (external link)
You guys are amusing, really.

A sovereign nation does not have to let you in. You're a guest in that nation, and it's their discretion as to whether you may enter or not, and if so on what terms.

What part of a nation being sovereign do you have a problem with and exactly why is it that you think you're so special as to be able to march in and demand that a foreign government allow you to do what you want, rather than asking permission to undertake an action on THEIR soil while respecting THEIR sovereignty?

No one is saying any of those things nor disputing the sovereignty of a nation. I am just looking for facts about photographing destination weddings. Unfortunately, most responses address people who are seeking to become Canadian employees. I am talking about people who are NOT employed in Canada or by a Canadian employer.

jwhite65 wrote in post #16837850 (external link)
To the OP - Do you have any intention of calling an official source for the correct answer? Or are you content to allow the debate here to go on endlessly?

I realize that this is necessary to get the facts. I am not a wedding photographer and have no intention of shooting weddings in Canada or any other foreign nation. This question was spurned on by another photographer in a discussion we were having and I became curious about the issue. That is all. I have already advised her that the only way she will get an accurate answer is to call the officials. Otherwise, I have no reason or power to stop a debate or discussion on the matter (which I think is a good and important question and should be addressed for reasons already stated.)


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Apr 16, 2014 09:15 |  #44

cory1848 wrote in post #16837896 (external link)
What....you don't like a good debate? :razz:

I have no problem debating something which has a reasonable expectation to come to some conclusion. Without a ruling from someone authorized to make such a ruling, this subject does not fall into that category. :)

YankeeMom wrote in post #16837930 (external link)
I realize that this is necessary to get the facts. I am not a wedding photographer and have no intention of shooting weddings in Canada or any other foreign nation. This question was spurned on by another photographer in a discussion we were having and I became curious about the issue. That is all. I have already advised her that the only way she will get an accurate answer is to call the officials. Otherwise, I have no reason or power to stop a debate or discussion on the matter (which I think is a good and important question and should be addressed for reasons already stated.)

I will take that as a "no".


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Apr 16, 2014 09:47 |  #45

A semi related topic, but is anyone familiar with how fine-art photography is handled in most countries? If I employ myself by selling prints to my own local markets, do most places still count it as 'employment' if I travel on vacation with the goal of touring places I haven't been while taking photographs that would later be processed and sold?

YankeeMom wrote in post #16837930 (external link)
I am talking about people who are NOT employed in Canada

Except you are 'employed' in Canada if you are doing work for which you are paid. If this wasn't the case then all the illegal farmers employed in the US could simply be hired outside of the country, legally brought in, then legally leave the country and collect their pay cheque.


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