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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 28 Apr 2014 (Monday) 15:30
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what Is the professional photography secrets?

 
dannequin
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Apr 30, 2014 03:41 |  #16

Honestly, there are no 'secrets' -- just shoot how you see something and edit it to what you want the outcome to be. There's a vast majority of people who are going to like your unique style of work. Just keep shooting! Don't be afraid to experiment!


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marwan
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Apr 30, 2014 08:45 |  #17

dannequin wrote in post #16871736 (external link)
Honestly, there are no 'secrets' -- just shoot how you see something and edit it to what you want the outcome to be. There's a vast majority of people who are going to like your unique style of work. Just keep shooting! Don't be afraid to experiment!

i love this express "just shoot how you see something and edit it to what you want the outcome to be" thanks I'll keep that in mind




  
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hairy_moth
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Apr 30, 2014 09:03 |  #18

marwan wrote in post #16867700 (external link)
i am a beginner and i need some Variations or advice and want to know what is my mistakes for my photos,its f/stops or shot speed or control of lighting etc...

I think the secret, which is not understood by many people not heavily involved in photography, is that: it is not easy to consistently get good photographs, it requires a fair amount of study and practice. And its corollary: Having a good camera does not mean you will get good pictures.

Anyone with a camera can occasionally get a good picture, and anyone can take a lot of pictures. But to: consistently, and on demand, in various situations, be able to produce good results; it takes a lot of work and their is no short cut.

To photographers, your questions make as much sense as, for example, the question: "What's the secret to speaking Latin?" The difference is, everyone understands that there is no secret, if you want to speak Latin, you need to study and practice.


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jay125
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Apr 30, 2014 09:04 |  #19

marwan, looking at your images, they look pretty good, so you have a great base to build from. I would say first learn your camera and explore what you can do with it, and then shoot shoot shoot.
CHIMP (CHeck IMage Preview) on your lcd to see if what your results are compare with what your vision was. If not, change it up a bit and check again, and remember what you just did. But I agree that the best idea is to shoot shoot shoot, read up on your camera on this forum and other sites, and youtube videos, while sometimes dry and boring really do contain some useful tutorials.



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PhotosGuy
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Apr 30, 2014 10:35 |  #20

marwan wrote in post #16869782 (external link)
thanks for reply and for your time ,here is answers for your questions :

How many shots did you take to get it?
absolutely i take a lot of shots with different setting as possible to understand what is the suitable setting for each environment but most of them become bad darker or lighter or blurred.
for example for 50 shots at the same environment or session only 3 or 4 become acceptable

#1 was taken on Av. If the 50 shots were all in Av, Tv, or P mode, the exposures should have been about the same IF you used the same framing for the shots.
There could be several reasons for the blurring.
These are reasons why I use Manual mode when there's time, & there usually is because I try to anticipate the coming situation, & if you had time to take 50 shots, you probably had the time, too.

See if you can make sense out of this: Need an exposure crutch?

And for when you ask "Why?": Post #47

Did you try exposure compensation? (EC)
no is that adjusting meter button marked with a “+/-” icon it makes photo looks brighter or darker and makes photo lost its natural color

That sounds about right, but I don't know your camera, so check your manual.

Did you try bouncing any fill light into his face?
1-if u mean a second light source by external flash the answer is no ,all i have is built in small flash
and that's difficult part for me it makes photo looks more lighter or darker some times u don't have time to measure the space between the camera and the object or to make change to the flash setting -/+ ,however i am planing to buy external flash but not sure if it can solve this.

Again, check your manual. Sometimes you can use the built in flash for fill, & if you can "make change to the flash setting -/+ ", then you're on the right track.
As for "measure the space between the camera and the object", take a look at this: Fill light at sunset

Or...

2-if u mean the main light source like sunlight yes but sometimes the object doesn't facing sunlight
and enforce u shot in possible skylight light i think i need buy foldable reflectors or bounce but its difficult to carry and hold especially when u r alone with kids.

I understand that it could be difficult, but you popped off 50 shots, so you had time to pull a folded 12" X 12" white cardboard out of your back pocket & use it to reflect some sunlight into his face? Or the other kid could have held an even bigger one?

As for, "sometimes the object doesn't facing sunlight", most of the time when they aren't doing that & squinting is much better. I like where the light is coming from in #1. Other times on a overcast day or in the shade works pretty well, too: VERY simple "outdoor studio"
There's a step-by-step WB & exposure workflow in post #15.
And be sure to also look at the "Angelina" link.

Did you try any vertical format shots?
yes i think way of turn the camera in a horizontal or landscape depend on target or the view

True, but there's nothing to the sides of either shot that interests me, so why not use the vertical format?


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Apr 30, 2014 19:41 |  #21

CanonVsNikon wrote in post #16868761 (external link)
Shoot in good light. That in itself will bring out the best in your pictures. Light is the difference between a good picture and potentially great/epic one.

"Shoot in good light" is good advice for some, but could leave other people confused and feeling helpless.

For someone to go out and try to shoot pictures in good light can be frustrating when they don't really understand what good light is and how to recognize it when they see it. Learning to recognize "good light" is very difficult for some people. Additionally, "good light" for one type of image is often different from "good light" for another style of image.

I think what is most important is to be able to recognize the different qualities of light and then to know which types of images will work best in that particular light. In my opinion, experience is the best way to learn how to recognize the various qualities of light.


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May 01, 2014 01:10 |  #22

venom3300 wrote in post #16867891 (external link)
remember that you aren't beginning to understand much of anything until about 10k pictures into it.

That's been proven to be incorrect

http://healthland.time​.com …-make-a-master-after-all/ (external link)

OP, just keep taking photos.


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Lyle ­ Krannichfeld
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May 01, 2014 02:50 |  #23

Forget all the technical stuff for now. Next time you look at an image that you love, ask why. Why do you love it? What is it about the image that stands out? Is it the moment? Is it beautiful light? WHY something is beautiful helps you to understand what needs to be added to your own photos. I'm not saying rip off their ideas or content, I'm just saying add those elements into your own work. Good technique tends to be blend in, but it matters. Your portraits, for example are very centered. Putting their faces off center, 1/3 of the way over roughly, adds interest. Our brains are just wired that way.

Quick example from a photographer's page I was just looking at, Chris Burkard:

https://scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net …552428087843207​4368_o.jpg (external link)

Simple for me, it's not a mind blowing image, but I do love the glow of the evening light on the grass in the foreground and the drama of the mountains. So...I love good light, small details, foreground elements, sense of scale and wide angle perspectives. All of these things are important in my own work these days. At first I deliberately thought about these things when I shot, but now it just happens naturally.

So what do you like?


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May 01, 2014 04:03 |  #24

Lyle, sorry, but if you do not "own" that photo, POTN rules say don't post it, but post a link to it!


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airfrogusmc
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May 01, 2014 07:14 |  #25

There are no secrets only real knowledge and it's a LONG road....THe technical part is the easy part and that takes some time to master. The hard part is learning to see and then having the developed instinct to capture that vision. It takes years and as already been mentioned there are no shortcuts. And then after all of that you still might not have the creativity or the vision. If it were easy or everyone could do it then everyone would be a great photographer.




  
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neilwood32
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May 01, 2014 07:46 |  #26

airfrogusmc wrote in post #16874462 (external link)
There are no secrets only real knowledge and it's a LONG road....THe technical part is the easy part and that takes some time to master. The hard part is learning to see and then having the developed instinct to capture that vision. It takes years and as already been mentioned there are no shortcuts. And then after all of that you still might not have the creativity or the vision. If it were easy or everyone could do it then everyone would be a great photographer.

bw!This!

Getting from complete beginner to competent can be a quicker step however.

I think the hardest thing to develop is truly critical eye - to be able to look at a photo or setting and work out what would make it into a better image. More light, less light, better angled light or a combination of all of these? (yes it is possible to have more and less light at the same time- more in some places and blocking the light in others)
Would I get a better result from a different angle or location?
Is the shutter speed/ aperture/ ISO correct for the image I want?
Is the subject posed in the best way?
How is the composition - is the subject best in the middle, left, right, top, bottom etc? What do I want to keep in the shot and what do I want to lose?

Another question is - does this image "feel" right? I have taken some and known instantly that they are going to be keepers.


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marwan
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Jul 07, 2014 14:29 |  #27

PhotosGuy wrote in post #16872369 (external link)
#1 was taken on Av. If the 50 shots were all in Av, Tv, or P mode, the exposures should have been about the same IF you used the same framing for the shots.
There could be several reasons for the blurring.
These are reasons why I use Manual mode when there's time, & there usually is because I try to anticipate the coming situation, & if you had time to take 50 shots, you probably had the time, too.

See if you can make sense out of this: Need an exposure crutch?

And for when you ask "Why?": Post #47
That sounds about right, but I don't know your camera, so check your manual.
Again, check your manual. Sometimes you can use the built in flash for fill, & if you can "make change to the flash setting -/+ ", then you're on the right track.
As for "measure the space between the camera and the object", take a look at this: Fill light at sunset

Or...
I understand that it could be difficult, but you popped off 50 shots, so you had time to pull a folded 12" X 12" white cardboard out of your back pocket & use it to reflect some sunlight into his face? Or the other kid could have held an even bigger one?

As for, "sometimes the object doesn't facing sunlight", most of the time when they aren't doing that & squinting is much better. I like where the light is coming from in #1. Other times on a overcast day or in the shade works pretty well, too: VERY simple "outdoor studio"
There's a step-by-step WB & exposure workflow in post #15.
And be sure to also look at the "Angelina" link.
True, but there's nothing to the sides of either shot that interests me, so why not use the vertical format?

just want to thank you, i follow your tips and i become better I've learned a lot from you more than methods and best practices.you can't imagine how much i try to follow your steps in every shot
thanks again I have officially wasted your time




  
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marwan
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Jul 07, 2014 14:49 |  #28

jay125 wrote in post #16872167 (external link)
marwan, looking at your images, they look pretty good, so you have a great base to build from. I would say first learn your camera and explore what you can do with it, and then shoot shoot shoot.
CHIMP (CHeck IMage Preview) on your lcd to see if what your results are compare with what your vision was. If not, change it up a bit and check again, and remember what you just did. But I agree that the best idea is to shoot shoot shoot, read up on your camera on this forum and other sites, and youtube videos, while sometimes dry and boring really do contain some useful tutorials.

i am gratefuller to you i found youtube is great resource i download a lot of lessons
The lesson I learned from you in this regard: "Plan less, explore more!"
and should always thank anyone who has taken time from their schedule to speak with you about the position or provide you with a service
:D




  
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marwan
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Jul 07, 2014 15:00 |  #29

Tom Reichner wrote in post #16873643 (external link)
"Shoot in good light" is good advice for some, but could leave other people confused and feeling helpless.

For someone to go out and try to shoot pictures in good light can be frustrating when they don't really understand what good light is and how to recognize it when they see it. Learning to recognize "good light" is very difficult for some people. Additionally, "good light" for one type of image is often different from "good light" for another style of image.

I think what is most important is to be able to recognize the different qualities of light and then to know which types of images will work best in that particular light. In my opinion, experience is the best way to learn how to recognize the various qualities of light.

thanks and of course this maxim is true; no light equals no pho*to*graph
but it seems there is no such thing as bad light. You can achieve GREAT pho*tog*ra*phy with any light so long as that light suits the mood of the pho*to*graph




  
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marwan
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Jul 07, 2014 15:06 |  #30

elrey2375 wrote in post #16874147 (external link)
That's been proven to be incorrect

http://healthland.time​.com …-make-a-master-after-all/ (external link)

OP, just keep taking photos.

thanks thats support me at my weakest ;)




  
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