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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 05 May 2014 (Monday) 12:11
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Studio lights freezing movement

 
LensNV
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May 05, 2014 12:11 |  #1

Hi,

I need to photography some young children in a couple of weeks against a white background. Children don't seem to sit still for long so could some one advise on what camper and off camera flash settings I should use,

I'm using a canon 5d mkiii and elinchrom D-Lite 400 RX lights.

Any info would b great.

Thanks

Simon




  
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gonzogolf
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May 05, 2014 12:19 |  #2

As long as your arent getting any significant ambient light contribution in your studio then the lights should freeze the motion. Unless you have the kids jumping or some other motion where you try to freeze them in full active motion you shouldnt have to worry at all. The duration on studio strobes is enough to freeze the fidgets and casual motions. But if you are wanting to freeze motion, here are a few thoughts. Shutter speed doesnt really matter as the flash duration becomes your effective shutter speed (for proof google freezing bullets in midair). Most studio strobes have their shortest duration at full power (unlike speedlites and the einstein from PCB). So if you wanted to freeze someone jumping full power would be best.




  
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pyrojim
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May 05, 2014 13:37 |  #3

gonzogolf wrote in post #16883615 (external link)
As long as your arent getting any significant ambient light contribution in your studio then the lights should freeze the motion. Unless you have the kids jumping or some other motion where you try to freeze them in full active motion you shouldnt have to worry at all. The duration on studio strobes is enough to freeze the fidgets and casual motions. But if you are wanting to freeze motion, here are a few thoughts. Shutter speed doesnt really matter as the flash duration becomes your effective shutter speed (for proof google freezing bullets in midair). Most studio strobes have their shortest duration at full power (unlike speedlites and the einstein from PCB). So if you wanted to freeze someone jumping full power would be best.


Some packs use capacitor switching to achieve faster speed at lower power too, as in speedotron packs.

Other high speed packs that operate on IGBT circuitry like speedlites and Einstein from PCB are the Profoto Pro8a, the Bowens Creo, and the Broncolor Scoro....Saddly those also cost one arm, one leg, and usually something internal.

I am not familiar enough with elinchrom, but if you have some elinchrom flash units, maybe, you also have some speedlites which can definitely free motion!


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LensNV
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May 05, 2014 14:03 |  #4

Thanks for the info. Yes, in addition to my elinchrom strobes I also have a couple on Canon 600 ex-rt speedlights. Any setup you would recommend. Basically the request is for the kids against a white background.




  
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gonzogolf
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May 05, 2014 14:06 |  #5

Have you done white backgrounds before? If so, just the same way you would before.




  
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LensNV
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May 05, 2014 14:08 |  #6

Yes. I tend to light it 1-2 stops brighter than the key light. Assume that's correct.




  
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gonzogolf
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May 05, 2014 14:10 |  #7

LensNV wrote in post #16883878 (external link)
Yes. I tend to light it 1-2 stops brighter than the key light. Assume that's correct.

Yes, that will work. Just be careful that the kids dont get so close to the drop that you start getting wrap light bouncing back and cutting down your edge contrast.




  
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pyrojim
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May 05, 2014 14:18 |  #8

gonzogolf wrote in post #16883884 (external link)
Yes, that will work. Just be careful that the kids dont get so close to the drop that you start getting wrap light bouncing back and cutting down your edge contrast.




I suppose we could tie the children in place? :)


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gonzogolf
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May 05, 2014 14:21 |  #9

pyrojim wrote in post #16883909 (external link)
I suppose we could tie the children in place? :)

I prefer duct tape myself.




  
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LensNV
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May 05, 2014 14:55 |  #10

Yes, I've had a slight problem with fine hair slightly blowing out. Not an issue with contrast or clothing just fine whispy hair. What distance would you recommend from the background to the subject.




  
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gonzogolf
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May 05, 2014 15:19 |  #11

LensNV wrote in post #16884031 (external link)
Yes, I've had a slight problem with fine hair slightly blowing out. Not an issue with contrast or clothing just fine whispy hair. What distance would you recommend from the background to the subject.

It depends on how bright your background is. I like having about 5 feet or so because that eliminates shadows falling on the drop, but this is the part that comes down to taste. I've heard you can meter the light bouncing off the drop and falling on the subject's back so that its roughly the same as the light falling on the front. I've never tried that method, but it might be worth a shot.




  
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dmward
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May 05, 2014 17:24 |  #12

gonzogolf wrote in post #16884084 (external link)
It depends on how bright your background is. I like having about 5 feet or so because that eliminates shadows falling on the drop, but this is the part that comes down to taste. I've heard you can meter the light bouncing off the drop and falling on the subject's back so that its roughly the same as the light falling on the front. I've never tried that method, but it might be worth a shot.

That approach works well. I setup my main with the power I want. Mostly I shoot this kind of stuff about F10. Then I get the background even side to side and bottom to top. Once that's accomplished I put those lights into a group and stand on the T mark. point the meter dome at the background and adjust power till its F10.

First test shot confirms the relationship and I make final adjustment, then fire away.

That setup takes 4 lights. Main, fill and two on the background. THIS (external link) job was shot using that technique. Notice that the edge of her arms are subtlety shadowed rather than wrapped with light from background.


David | Sharing my Insights, Knowledge & Experience (external link) | dmwfotos website (external link)

  
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LensNV
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May 06, 2014 00:55 |  #13

dmward wrote in post #16884348 (external link)
That approach works well. I setup my main with the power I want. Mostly I shoot this kind of stuff about F10. Then I get the background even side to side and bottom to top. Once that's accomplished I put those lights into a group and stand on the T mark. point the meter dome at the background and adjust power till its F10.

First test shot confirms the relationship and I make final adjustment, then fire away.

That setup takes 4 lights. Main, fill and two on the background. THIS (external link) job was shot using that technique. Notice that the edge of her arms are subtlety shadowed rather than wrapped with light from background.

Thanks for the comment. So looking at your setup you have the background at the same exposure as you key lights?




  
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Studio lights freezing movement
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