Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing 
Thread started 07 May 2014 (Wednesday) 09:11
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

What kind of equipment do I need to shoot good video?

 
joeblack2022
Goldmember
3,005 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Sep 2011
Location: The Great White North
     
May 09, 2014 10:17 |  #16

frugivore wrote in post #16891270 (external link)
Any suggestions?

Regarding the time-limited capture, it is 30 minutes for the newer DSLRs right? Is this really something to be concerned about?

Also, what do you mean by "flexible" audio input?

To be honest, I'm not very up to date with what's on the market right now. Also a bunch of professional 4K-capable cameras have been recently released so that should cause ripples in the consumer space soon enough.

I can't recall exactly what the time limit is, I think it's 25 mins but having a break in your video is never a good thing. Even a few frames lost can ruin your video if they happen to be in the wrong spot.

Well for DSLRs that have audio input capability, you are looking at 1/8" stereo input and limited control as well. You'll need to invest in an external preamp or recorder setup to complement and in some cases they won't offer you real-time audio monitoring without running Magic Lantern or some creative hardware setup.

Semi-pro camcorders and up usually have dual XLR input, manual trim / gain on each channel, mic / line selectable input, channel linking, and phantom power (to drive condenser mics) just off the top of my head.

And also headphone out for monitoring. I can't stress this point enough - you need to be monitoring your audio because the meters will only tell you that audio is present. I have seen more than my fair share of videos ruined by bad audio because there was a buzz, excessive background noise, audio clipping, or even no audio at all because someone neglected to check with headphones.

And yes, what tickerguy said above too.


Joel

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
EL_PIC
Goldmember
Avatar
2,028 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Dec 2009
Location: Austin Texas - Lucca Italy
     
May 09, 2014 14:18 |  #17
bannedPermanent ban

frugivore wrote in post #16891109 (external link)
So you think that the 70D is still lacking compared to a proper camcorder? Can you give an example of this?

What brand/model would you suggest I look at?

"Pro" camcorders start at $1K new and amateur consumer from a few hundred.
http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …ras/ci/16763/N/​4256818817 (external link)
Personally - I like the Sony NX3 but the real video Canon units are from $1.5K.


EL_PIC - RIT BS Photo '78 - Photomask Engineering Mgr
Canon DSLR - Nikon SLR - Phase One 60MP MFDSLR
http://www.Photo-Image-Creations.com (external link)
http://www.musecube.co​m/el_pic/ (external link)
http://www.facebook.co​m/PhotoImageCreations (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tickerguy
Senior Member
595 posts
Joined Dec 2012
     
May 11, 2014 14:53 |  #18

ABSOLUTELY on the audio monitoring. I shoot a fair bit of video and there is ALWAYS a pair of headphones hung on my tripod that get checked up front and listened to during the shoot.

You will only make the mistake of not doing this once.

Note that for quality headphones you will probably need an inline amplifier of some description too, and you want OVER THE EAR (isolating) ones for this use; it is utterly essential that you hear what you are actually laying down on your audio tracks, NOT the background.


Canon 7D & 5d3, EF-S 15-85, 24-105L, 70-200L f/4 IS, 100mm Macro/L, EF 50 f/1.4 and more

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
frugivore
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
3,089 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 118
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
     
May 12, 2014 03:38 |  #19

tickerguy wrote in post #16892402 (external link)
IMHO "capturing events as they happen" is camcorder territory.

Making FILMS is quite productive with a dSLR in many cases.

They're very, very different things. No dSLR is going to do what you want for "point and shoot, all auto" video sort of "grab and go" stuff. They're just not well-suited to it.

Now for filmmaking it's a different story. There control of depth-of-field, pulling focus and similar are all very important, and the dSLR (until you start talking about cameras like a RED) are superior to the camcorder.

But "point and push button" shooting for video is just not the dSLR's forte.

Perhaps I should be more specific on what type of video I'd like to capture, rather than describe it as "videography" vs "filmmaking". My 4-year-old daughter is riding her tricycle around the neighborhood. I am in front of her moving backwards capturing the video and I need to keep the picture steady and also to keep focus on her face. I've done this type of video with my EOS M and, while it did a decent job, there were times when it couldn't keep up and times when there was too much shake. I understand that because most camcorders have smaller sensors than DSLRs and their lenses are not very wide (unless you're looking at very high-end gear), that you can maintain focus easily. So a camcorder could have kept her in focus because of this, but I could also have stopped down more with the EOS M and improved things. My guess is that the shake can only really be overcome with stabilizing gear, even if I were using a camcorder with some sort of built-in image stabilization.

joeblack2022 wrote in post #16892664 (external link)
To be honest, I'm not very up to date with what's on the market right now. Also a bunch of professional 4K-capable cameras have been recently released so that should cause ripples in the consumer space soon enough.

I can't recall exactly what the time limit is, I think it's 25 mins but having a break in your video is never a good thing. Even a few frames lost can ruin your video if they happen to be in the wrong spot.

The time limit is now 30 minutes, at least on my 5D3, and I believe it's the same on the 70D. I'm having a hard time thinking of a situation where a break after 30 minutes would ruin my video. Perhaps something like a wedding ceremony? Even so, wouldn't you have a second camera set up from a different angle that you could cut to?

joeblack2022 wrote in post #16892664 (external link)
Well for DSLRs that have audio input capability, you are looking at 1/8" stereo input and limited control as well. You'll need to invest in an external preamp or recorder setup to complement and in some cases they won't offer you real-time audio monitoring without running Magic Lantern or some creative hardware setup.

Semi-pro camcorders and up usually have dual XLR input, manual trim / gain on each channel, mic / line selectable input, channel linking, and phantom power (to drive condenser mics) just off the top of my head.

And also headphone out for monitoring. I can't stress this point enough - you need to be monitoring your audio because the meters will only tell you that audio is present. I have seen more than my fair share of videos ruined by bad audio because there was a buzz, excessive background noise, audio clipping, or even no audio at all because someone neglected to check with headphones.

And yes, what tickerguy said above too.

I appreciate the in-depth discussion on audio. I've always known that audio is as important as the video, but don't really know what's involved in getting good audio. I have in-camera monitoring and audio out on the 5D3, but only one input. And the 70D does not let you monitor audio nor has on-screen monitoring, so that seems to be a concern. Even if I were to use a mic that has its own headphone jack so that I can monitor with the 70D, I suppose I'd still be limited to one audio source that I can check.

Let's suppose I had a camcorder with dual XLR inputs and I wanted to record someone making a speech on a podium and I had to shoot from a distance. What would be the typical audio devices that I would connect to it? I'd imagine that I'd need a separate recording device (e.g. Zoom H4N) and would need to sync the audio in post. Would a camcorder still have an advantage over a DSLR in this case?

EL_PIC wrote in post #16893217 (external link)
"Pro" camcorders start at $1K new and amateur consumer from a few hundred.
http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …ras/ci/16763/N/​4256818817 (external link)
Personally - I like the Sony NX3 but the real video Canon units are from $1.5K.

I had a look and after filtering for HD resolution with 1/3" sensor (most common) and XLR inputs, the Canon XA10 HD was the cheapest of the bunch. But I noticed that these have some extra features like focus peaking, zebras and a few more.

tickerguy wrote in post #16897370 (external link)
ABSOLUTELY on the audio monitoring. I shoot a fair bit of video and there is ALWAYS a pair of headphones hung on my tripod that get checked up front and listened to during the shoot.

You will only make the mistake of not doing this once.

Note that for quality headphones you will probably need an inline amplifier of some description too, and you want OVER THE EAR (isolating) ones for this use; it is utterly essential that you hear what you are actually laying down on your audio tracks, NOT the background.

This would be something like what a DJ would wear, correct? I have a DJ friend that I can ask for recommendations.

Just like when I look at the playback of a still image made with shallow DOF and flash/strobe (because the image will look nothing like what it looks like with the naked eye), so to must I check my audio during a recording. I get it.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tickerguy
Senior Member
595 posts
Joined Dec 2012
     
May 12, 2014 10:45 |  #20

Correct fru.

What I use for "speaker behind podium" (or political debates, which is one of the places I tend to get asked to do this sort of thing) is a wireless mic that goes on the podium with the receiver at the camera end. That goes into the camera and the monitoring is there for the guy with the handle in his fingers (me) via a set of studio monitor headphones. If it's one speaker then I stick a body pack on him or her; if it's multiples then understanding if they're going to "stand and deliver" or walk around becomes important -- if the latter you need to tap into the room PA or get them to use YOUR mic and give the room PA YOUR feed.

In most cases I also lay down a second track that's "room ambient"; while monitoring I have one in each ear. During post I merge the channels into one monaural blend; if the podium has an offset (as is common for political events and similar) then I offset the podium audio over to the appropriate place in the stereo image in post.

If I'm shooting a live event that has actual stereo/multichannel content (e.g. a live band, etc) then it's a bit different -- in that case what I really want is a feed off the band's board as a primary reference, but often I can't get one. I ALWAYS back that up with my own mics and typically in a live performance situation I want to take four channels of audio and sometimes more -- a school concert or performance can be done with three (two side channels and one center.)

You can always move your captured sources around in post but you can't create an audio channel that you don't have! The more-specialized you can get with what you can pick up and record the more flexibility you have; this isn't real important with a speaker but it gets important FAST with performances. The trick is managing to monitor all of that during the event; a real board and having all the actual recording happening in one place becomes important once you get beyond two channels.

Beware if you try to use multiple small 2-channel audio recorders rather than one multi-track capable device -- those small units typically have no concept of timecode and their timebases drift a bit. This is not a big problem with reasonable-length takes but for very long takes and especially with multiple independent recordings it can become one and result in some really bizarre artifacts in the end product that come from phase differences if the timebase drift is small or a "fake" reverb if its larger and it's very difficult to correct out after the fact.


Canon 7D & 5d3, EF-S 15-85, 24-105L, 70-200L f/4 IS, 100mm Macro/L, EF 50 f/1.4 and more

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sspellman
Goldmember
Avatar
1,731 posts
Likes: 29
Joined Dec 2006
Location: Detroit, Michigan
     
May 12, 2014 18:14 |  #21

If think there is a level of personal home movies and then another level of professional video work. For personal projects, a DSLR with a tripod, small shoulder mount, shotgun mic, and auto audio levels will deliver a very good product. Will it track focus perfectly, no. Will it provide great audio recording in all situations, no. But it is manageable by one person and does a good solid job for most situations. All you would need to add to your EOS M is a light video head like a Manfrotto 502 fr our tripod, a good shotgun mic like a Rode VideoMic Pro, and a basic shoulder mount like a Revo SR1000. With a basic shoulder mount and a IS stabilized lens such as the Canon 17-55/2.8 you will have less problems with focus and shake.

The next step up is too replace the camera with a better focusing DSLR like the Canon 70D, but it is heavier and harder to manage by one person.

Getting to the pro level will require multiple cameras, multiple camera people, constant audio monitoring, external video monitors, and it is much more expensive and hard to operate. There is a large learning and expense curve here that does not really make sense for personal projects.

-Scott


ScottSpellmanMedia.com [photography]

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
frugivore
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
3,089 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 118
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
     
Jun 02, 2014 17:16 |  #22

tickerguy wrote in post #16899052 (external link)
Correct fru.

What I use for "speaker behind podium" (or political debates, which is one of the places I tend to get asked to do this sort of thing) is a wireless mic that goes on the podium with the receiver at the camera end. That goes into the camera and the monitoring is there for the guy with the handle in his fingers (me) via a set of studio monitor headphones. If it's one speaker then I stick a body pack on him or her; if it's multiples then understanding if they're going to "stand and deliver" or walk around becomes important -- if the latter you need to tap into the room PA or get them to use YOUR mic and give the room PA YOUR feed.

In most cases I also lay down a second track that's "room ambient"; while monitoring I have one in each ear. During post I merge the channels into one monaural blend; if the podium has an offset (as is common for political events and similar) then I offset the podium audio over to the appropriate place in the stereo image in post.

If I'm shooting a live event that has actual stereo/multichannel content (e.g. a live band, etc) then it's a bit different -- in that case what I really want is a feed off the band's board as a primary reference, but often I can't get one. I ALWAYS back that up with my own mics and typically in a live performance situation I want to take four channels of audio and sometimes more -- a school concert or performance can be done with three (two side channels and one center.)

You can always move your captured sources around in post but you can't create an audio channel that you don't have! The more-specialized you can get with what you can pick up and record the more flexibility you have; this isn't real important with a speaker but it gets important FAST with performances. The trick is managing to monitor all of that during the event; a real board and having all the actual recording happening in one place becomes important once you get beyond two channels.

Beware if you try to use multiple small 2-channel audio recorders rather than one multi-track capable device -- those small units typically have no concept of timecode and their timebases drift a bit. This is not a big problem with reasonable-length takes but for very long takes and especially with multiple independent recordings it can become one and result in some really bizarre artifacts in the end product that come from phase differences if the timebase drift is small or a "fake" reverb if its larger and it's very difficult to correct out after the fact.

Thanks for sharing your experience with me. I'm not quite at the level to be able to manage the more advanced techniques that you describe, but I'll get there. I'll have to check my audio equipment and see whether they handle time code. Not sure if I mentioned it, but I ended up getting some Tascam recorders and another mic. Just some basic stuff to practice with for now.

These past few weeks, I got some practice doing video and audio. I have yet to do any editing in post with what i recorded. I don't even have a decent NLE for video yet. Will Premiere Pro be sufficient for my audio editing as well as video? I do have Plural Eyes for syncing though.

sspellman wrote in post #16900012 (external link)
If think there is a level of personal home movies and then another level of professional video work. For personal projects, a DSLR with a tripod, small shoulder mount, shotgun mic, and auto audio levels will deliver a very good product. Will it track focus perfectly, no. Will it provide great audio recording in all situations, no. But it is manageable by one person and does a good solid job for most situations. All you would need to add to your EOS M is a light video head like a Manfrotto 502 fr our tripod, a good shotgun mic like a Rode VideoMic Pro, and a basic shoulder mount like a Revo SR1000. With a basic shoulder mount and a IS stabilized lens such as the Canon 17-55/2.8 you will have less problems with focus and shake.

The next step up is too replace the camera with a better focusing DSLR like the Canon 70D, but it is heavier and harder to manage by one person.

Getting to the pro level will require multiple cameras, multiple camera people, constant audio monitoring, external video monitors, and it is much more expensive and hard to operate. There is a large learning and expense curve here that does not really make sense for personal projects.

-Scott

I decided to just practice with the 5D3 for now. The lack of IS on my primes or my 24-70mm is causing lots of camera shake. I was thinking that the 35mm f/2 IS would be a great lens for video where I hand holds, but I really don't want to but another lens. I tried the EOS M with the 18-55mm, and while the quality wasn't as good as the 5D3 with a prime, I can live with it. And shooting at f/8 makes up for its less-than-stellar video AF.

Once I get a good foundation, I'll have a good hard look at some camcorders.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tickerguy
Senior Member
595 posts
Joined Dec 2012
     
Jun 10, 2014 08:30 |  #23

Premiere Pro is fine; I prefer Vegas' workflow myself but I have Premiere as well because there are some projects I work on where the client wants it in that format for their own purposes (that is, they want the intermediates and edit files, not just the final product) or where I've got to "eat" content someone else has worked on with Premiere.


Canon 7D & 5d3, EF-S 15-85, 24-105L, 70-200L f/4 IS, 100mm Macro/L, EF 50 f/1.4 and more

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
J ­ Michael
Senior Member
970 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 51
Joined Feb 2010
Location: Atlanta
     
Jun 10, 2014 16:19 |  #24

frugivore wrote in post #16888058 (external link)
I am very comfortable with still photography, but video is another matter. I understand some of the limitations of shooting video with a DSLR, but for what I'm shooting I think it would be ok. My main challenges are panning, where I need to get s smooth movement, audio, where I need to get clear sound, and focus, where I need to maintain focus on my subject while moving.

I had planned on getting a camcorder to do this, but the Canon 70D the looks to be up to the task for great video. Particularly with its dual pixel technology. I can leverage my existing lenses as well.

For panning and movement, I have a tripod but I don't have a video head nor a dolly.I think that these are essential for smooth video. Is that right? If so, what would you recommend? I have a swiss-arca mount that I can use. Also, what's a good stabilizer for this (let's say I would just use light lenses on it when hand holding)

For audio, I have a Rode VMP shotgun mic, but I would also like a secondary recorder. Any recommendations for this? My friend uses an H4N (i think) and he seems to like it.

Thanks for any suggestions the at you have!

Re panning there are two potential issues to look out for. The first has to do with the actual smooth movement of the camera, where the motion should start without a sudden jarring movement and should be smooth throughout the pan, ending smoothly. For that you need a good video head and sticks that won't twist from the torsion of the turning movement of the head. The second has to do with the frame rate and encoding that's used. If you are shooting 24 fps but panning too fast you can get a juddering artifact that will ruin the shot.

Re the audio recorder some like the Zooms and some like Tascam. The high end (buy once, maintains value) solution would be a Zaxcom or Sound Devices unit. If you buy a recorder that has balanced inputs then you'll want microphones that work with that interface.

One issue you'll run into with any DSLR is a need to monitor the output on something other than the tiny screen on the back of the camera. Something like a 7" SmallHD monitor would help. Focus peaking is desirable on the monitor.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Monticore
Hatchling
8 posts
Joined Jun 2014
     
Jun 12, 2014 12:31 |  #25

For panning I have been using a Manfrotto 502 video head. If I'm very carefull I can get perfectly acceptable slow pans at 24fps. I would like to upgrade to a sachtler head at some point. Fast pans at 24fps don't work for me. I use a Lanparte follow focus unit to pull focus on a Lanparte rail system. The rail system is modular and can be expanded to become a shoulder unit for handheld. With a video head and the camera on a decent set of legs you can get smooth pans depending on the action and practice. For audio I use a Roland r26. All this stuff is a lot to juggle but I'm mostly shooting narrative stuff and what's good for me might be a crappy set up for another. If I were to shoot mostly handheld I would use a lens with image stabilization and make sure I had a bean bag to take the place of a tripod for static shots that would strip it down. For me, I 'd take a solid static shot over a choppy pan.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ben_r_
-POTN's Three legged Support-
Avatar
15,894 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Jun 18, 2014 17:19 |  #26

If youre serious about taking DSLR video to a higher level start with this book: LINK (external link)

Then be prepared to spend more on video gear than you did on photography gear. And equally on audio gear.


[Gear List | Flickr (external link) | My Reviews] /|\ Tripod Leg Protection (external link) /|\
GIVE a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. TEACH a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
frugivore
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
3,089 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 118
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Toronto, Canada
     
Jul 07, 2014 19:14 |  #27

J Michael wrote in post #16963809 (external link)
Re panning there are two potential issues to look out for. The first has to do with the actual smooth movement of the camera, where the motion should start without a sudden jarring movement and should be smooth throughout the pan, ending smoothly. For that you need a good video head and sticks that won't twist from the torsion of the turning movement of the head. The second has to do with the frame rate and encoding that's used. If you are shooting 24 fps but panning too fast you can get a juddering artifact that will ruin the shot.

I bought a good video head and I'm getting smooth pans, but I'm using the head on a non-video tripod (still looking for a good one), so I can probably improve in that area. There is not much action in my scenes, and so my 30fps seems to be sufficient. I'm using ALL-I compression.

Re the audio recorder some like the Zooms and some like Tascam. The high end (buy once, maintains value) solution would be a Zaxcom or Sound Devices unit. If you buy a recorder that has balanced inputs then you'll want microphones that work with that interface.

I have the Tascam DR-60D that accepts multiple input types. I am using only the Rode VMP with it right now, and it works fine for dialogue that's close to the camera. I used the Rode once without the Tascam and found it hard to change levels quickly, for example when people started clapping, and ended up clipping the clapping. The dials on the Tascam would have helped, so I will always use it from now on. Also, I'll be looking into a wireless system with lav mic for when I can't get close to the speaker.

One issue you'll run into with any DSLR is a need to monitor the output on something other than the tiny screen on the back of the camera. Something like a 7" SmallHD monitor would help. Focus peaking is desirable on the monitor.

I really want the setup to be as small and mobile as possible. I think that DPAF will help with focusing, but I'm not sure I'll be investing in the 70D, but wait for a full frame camera with this feature. In the meantime, I'll experiment with ML on the 5D3. The LCD on the camera isn't too small and my eyesight is good.

Monticore wrote in post #16967572 (external link)
For panning I have been using a Manfrotto 502 video head. If I'm very carefull I can get perfectly acceptable slow pans at 24fps. I would like to upgrade to a sachtler head at some point. Fast pans at 24fps don't work for me. I use a Lanparte follow focus unit to pull focus on a Lanparte rail system. The rail system is modular and can be expanded to become a shoulder unit for handheld. With a video head and the camera on a decent set of legs you can get smooth pans depending on the action and practice. For audio I use a Roland r26. All this stuff is a lot to juggle but I'm mostly shooting narrative stuff and what's good for me might be a crappy set up for another. If I were to shoot mostly handheld I would use a lens with image stabilization and make sure I had a bean bag to take the place of a tripod for static shots that would strip it down. For me, I 'd take a solid static shot over a choppy pan.

I don't have any stabilized lenses other than the 70-200mcatI do shoot hand held at times and using the 24-70mm, don't get very smooth shots. I'm considering the 35mm IS for wide shots.

ben_r_ wrote in post #16980095 (external link)
If youre serious about taking DSLR video to a higher level start with this book: LINK (external link)

Then be prepared to spend more on video gear than you did on photography gear. And equally on audio gear.

I have that book in my Amazon cart and will buy it tonight. Thanks for the recommendation.

So far, I've identified that I need a video tripod, video monopod, a stabilized lens, a wireless mic system, a slider and a book. I hope there's no more after that!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TTGator
Senior Member
Avatar
649 posts
Joined Aug 2007
Location: High Point, NC
     
Jul 10, 2014 08:17 |  #28

That book looks very promising. Just ordered a copy myself...


5DII & 5DIII | 85 F1.8 | 100mm F2.8 Macro | 16-35 II L | 35L | 24-105 F4L [COLOR=black]| 70-200 F2.8 IS L | Speedlite 540EX | AB800(x4) | Manfrotto 561BHDV Monopod |
Radiopopper JrX | Newton Di100FR2 | Sekonic L-358 | Lastolite TriGrip | A long Christmas list
Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Amadauss
Senior Member
Avatar
682 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 134
Joined Nov 2010
Location: Lehigh Valley Pa
     
Jul 11, 2014 15:06 as a reply to  @ TTGator's post |  #29

The topic was what gear and was more curious what lens people would suggest to us. Have the 7D and 5d Mark II so looking for the best lens to use. Going to be doing mostly short videos of interviews so going to be somewhat close to the subject with not a lot of panning going on. Thought maybe a 17 x 40 mm lens to start but not sure. Thanks for any help.


1-1Dx II 1-5D Mark 4, 3-5D Mark III, 5D Mark II, 2-7D's, 70D, canon 70-200 2.8 L IS II, 24-70L II, 85 1.8, 85 1.2, 50mm, 135 mm F2 L, 17-40 , 24-105, Sigma 35 Art and 18-35 1.8, 600 EX's, Elinchrom RX and Phottix 500 strobes

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
fullfram
Member
36 posts
Joined Jun 2014
Location: Sydney Australia
     
Aug 01, 2014 22:08 |  #30

Definitely a fluid head tripod. Dollies are annoying sometimes so I suggest a slider. Depends on the work you're doing though.


Corporate video & photo at Full Frame Productions (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

7,183 views & 0 likes for this thread
What kind of equipment do I need to shoot good video?
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is quadrentau
2085 guests, 301 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.