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Thread started 10 May 2014 (Saturday) 18:29
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Photography Minor

 
Karl ­ C
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May 10, 2014 18:29 |  #1

Does anyone know of a four-year school here in the US offering an accredited online undergrad minor in Photography?

There are a lot of four-year schools offering Business/Communication​s degree programs in an online format, not having much luck finding a school offering an online minor in Photography.

I don't want a BA/BFA/BS in Photography, I'll finish my degree in either Business or Communications. Or I can finish my degree in Communications with a concentration in either Small Business Management or English or Journalism, and stick with learning photography through online courses and self-teaching.

My apologies if this question has already been asked and beaten into the ground. :D


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May 10, 2014 23:28 |  #2

I hold a degree in music. In my experience, those who wanted to minor in music got very little of the real academic meat of a music degree. They were mostly just involved in performances. I suspect the same will be true of photography. I also think an online degree is likely to miss the intense one on one instruction and interaction that make a fine arts degree (in music, photography, or any of the arts) unique. Hopefully those who have direct experience college photographic study will chime in with better advice than I have given, but I think I would not pursue an online photography minor. FWIW


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May 11, 2014 10:11 |  #3

Karl C wrote in post #16895778 (external link)
Does anyone know of a four-year school here in the US offering an accredited online undergrad minor in Photography?

So you haven't started yet? I'm asking because you go on to say, " I'll finish my degree..."

I don't want a BA/BFA/BS in Photography, I'll finish my degree in either Business or Communications. Or I can finish my degree in Communications with a concentration in either Small Business Management or English or Journalism, and stick with learning photography through online courses and self-teaching.

Online courses, self-teaching, + this forum would work best for me since you have 4 years to do it in.
See the links in this: General Info

WHAT type of photography are you mainly interested in now?
Have you considered a minor in graphic arts?


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groundloop
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May 11, 2014 11:03 |  #4

rgs wrote in post #16896256 (external link)
I also think an online degree is likely to miss the intense one on one instruction and interaction that make a fine arts degree (in music, photography, or any of the arts) unique.......


I totally agree with this. I've done online courses in other areas before and came away feeling kind of empty. Sure, doing an online course can be better than nothing, but IMO it just doesn't stack up to a classroom full of people who are interacting with the instructor, asking questions, and sharing knowledge.




  
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Kronie
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May 11, 2014 11:38 |  #5

Karl C wrote in post #16895778 (external link)
Does anyone know of a four-year school here in the US offering an accredited online undergrad minor in Photography?

If you spent four years on this board reading about cameras, lenses, lighting and the whatnot of photography you will gain just as much and possibly more than you will at any four year school. I dont think an online class would teach you anything that you couldn't get here for free. Although I have taken them just for fun...

Are you in school for fun? Because a degree in photography isn't going to get you far in the world. You could teach it with a masters if that was your plan. Do you aim to be a professional photographer, like for a living? If so I would get a business degree with a minor in marketing. This is what I have and now I am getting a masters in photography so I can teach.




  
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cory1848
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May 11, 2014 14:05 |  #6

I have a minor in Photography. Worth it? Sure, I think so. Gives you more than learning technical aspects. Some history involved and hands on studio projects. What makes it worth it? The classroom feedback from instructors and students. Student projects and collaboration. You won't get that with an online degree unfortunately.

What do you plan on getting out of it?


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Karl ­ C
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May 11, 2014 14:45 |  #7

rgs wrote in post #16896256 (external link)
I hold a degree in music. In my experience, those who wanted to minor in music got very little of the real academic meat of a music degree. They were mostly just involved in performances. I suspect the same will be true of photography. I also think an online degree is likely to miss the intense one on one instruction and interaction that make a fine arts degree (in music, photography, or any of the arts) unique. Hopefully those who have direct experience college photographic study will chime in with better advice than I have given, but I think I would not pursue an online photography minor. FWIW

Thanks - as for online versus campus learning, I'm an adult (48) student who works a full-time, Monday through Friday, 8 to 5 job. Universities here in Denver offering night programs geared toward students like me are non-existent except for University of Phoenix or a local school, Regis University. Going the online path is a better fit as it won't tie me to living here as moving onto a place where it does NOT snow is a goal. After living in Wisconsin for 14 years and almost two years here in Denver, I'll die a happy person if I never see snow (or cold) again. :grin:

PhotosGuy wrote in post #16896914 (external link)
So you haven't started yet? I'm asking because you go on to say, " I'll finish my degree..."
Online courses, self-teaching, + this forum would work best for me since you have 4 years to do it in.
See the links in this: General Info

WHAT type of photography are you mainly interested in now?
Have you considered a minor in graphic arts?

Thanks, Frank. I've managed a mere 40 credits (over the past 25+ years) towards a Bachelor's degree and I'm finally getting serious about completing school. I know an undergrad minor in photography probably is a waste of time and money - it was just a thought.

As for the type of photography that interests me, that's a difficult question to answer right now. Kinda struggling with a creativity block - which is annoying. If I were living in NYC or San Francisco, I'd feel different. Colorado is great if you're a landscape photographer, which I'm not.

groundloop wrote in post #16897009 (external link)
I totally agree with this. I've done online courses in other areas before and came away feeling kind of empty. Sure, doing an online course can be better than nothing, but IMO it just doesn't stack up to a classroom full of people who are interacting with the instructor, asking questions, and sharing knowledge.

I agree but no local university here offers their photography program for adult students like me. Hell, finding a school that offers more than just Business/IT/Liberal Arts degrees for working adult students is proving challenging.

Kronie wrote in post #16897065 (external link)
If you spent four years on this board reading about cameras, lenses, lighting and the whatnot of photography you will gain just as much and possibly more than you will at any four year school. I dont think an online class would teach you anything that you couldn't get here for free. Although I have taken them just for fun...

Are you in school for fun? Because a degree in photography isn't going to get you far in the world. You could teach it with a masters if that was your plan. Do you aim to be a professional photographer, like for a living? If so I would get a business degree with a minor in marketing. This is what I have and now I am getting a masters in photography so I can teach.

I have a subscription to Scott Kelby's site and have watched some videos that really have help, along with a couple of classes from Bryan Peterson.

I'm in school to complete the degree, for two reason. First, getting the Bachelor's is a life goal accomplishment. Two, the degree will help me in the work place. Do I want to be a professional photographer? I don't know, again, age is a factor here.

Most of my already-earned college credits are in Business and going that route would be the least painful, as opposed to starting out in a completely different direction.

cory1848 wrote in post #16897293 (external link)
I have a minor in Photography. Worth it? Sure, I think so. Gives you more than learning technical aspects. Some history involved and hands on studio projects. What makes it worth it? The classroom feedback from instructors and students. Student projects and collaboration. You won't get that with an online degree unfortunately.

What do you plan on getting out of it?

The obvious reason - obtaining formal education in photography. Yes, I can learn a lot from here but formal education adds that little bit of training that a self-taught photographer might fail to receive on their own. Additionally, formal education provides critiques from other professionals and opportunities to network, trying gain a foothold in the industry. Last night, I watched an interview on KelbyOne with Joe McNally - it was very interesting and enlightening. Maybe Joe wouldn't have been nearly as successful if he didn't have formal education and the connections built as a result of the degree.

Thanks everyone for the replies. Finishing school and getting the "piece of paper" is a priority - going for a BFA in Photography isn't smart, at least to me. Obtaining a degree in Business/Marketing/Com​munications seems more prudent. Additionally, right now, I'm nowhere near consistently good enough in photography to earn more than a few pennies from my shots. :oops:

:lol:


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May 11, 2014 15:44 |  #8

Karl C wrote in post #16897352 (external link)
Thanks - as for online versus campus learning, I'm an adult (48) student who works a full-time, Monday through Friday, 8 to 5 job. Universities here in Denver offering night programs geared toward students like me are non-existent except for University of Phoenix or a local school, Regis University. Going the online path is a better fit as it won't tie me to living here as moving onto a place where it does NOT snow is a goal. After living in Wisconsin for 14 years and almost two years here in Denver, I'll die a happy person if I never see snow (or cold) again. :grin:

Thanks, Frank. I've managed a mere 40 credits (over the past 25+ years) towards a Bachelor's degree and I'm finally getting serious about completing school. I know an undergrad minor in photography probably is a waste of time and money - it was just a thought.

As for the type of photography that interests me, that's a difficult question to answer right now. Kinda struggling with a creativity block - which is annoying. If I were living in NYC or San Francisco, I'd feel different. Colorado is great if you're a landscape photographer, which I'm not.

I agree but no local university here offers their photography program for adult students like me. Hell, finding a school that offers more than just Business/IT/Liberal Arts degrees for working adult students is proving challenging.

I have a subscription to Scott Kelby's site and have watched some videos that really have help, along with a couple of classes from Bryan Peterson.

I'm in school to complete the degree, for two reason. First, getting the Bachelor's is a life goal accomplishment. Two, the degree will help me in the work place. Do I want to be a professional photographer? I don't know, again, age is a factor here.

Most of my already-earned college credits are in Business and going that route would be the least painful, as opposed to starting out in a completely different direction.

The obvious reason - obtaining formal education in photography. Yes, I can learn a lot from here but formal education adds that little bit of training that a self-taught photographer might fail to receive on their own. Additionally, formal education provides critiques from other professionals and opportunities to network, trying gain a foothold in the industry. Last night, I watched an interview on KelbyOne with Joe McNally - it was very interesting and enlightening. Maybe Joe wouldn't have been nearly as successful if he didn't have formal education and the connections built as a result of the degree.

Thanks everyone for the replies. Finishing school and getting the "piece of paper" is a priority - going for a BFA in Photography isn't smart, at least to me. Obtaining a degree in Business/Marketing/Com​munications seems more prudent. Additionally, right now, I'm nowhere near consistently good enough in photography to earn more than a few pennies from my shots. :oops:

:lol:

Having watched my wife take online classes for the basics, English, Math, etc. I am not sure how an online class in Photography would help me understand the concepts outside of photo 101. What I Iearned at a campus setting I don't know how I could replicate that online. Seeing how light falls on an object or understand how to adjust studio lighting without being hands on I would find very difficult. I commend you for finishing your degree, it if is just for the "paper" by all means go for it, but I would still want hands on training, even if it didn't come with a credential. I guess it really depends on how one learns.


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May 11, 2014 15:51 |  #9

The live critiques with professors and other students that are on a fairly similar level as you are one of the most important parts of it all as well as the connections and life long relationships you form.




  
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Karl ­ C
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May 11, 2014 22:53 |  #10

cory1848 wrote in post #16897449 (external link)
I am not sure how an online class in Photography would help me understand the concepts outside of photo 101. What I learned at a campus setting I don't know how I could replicate that online. Seeing how light falls on an object or understand how to adjust studio lighting without being hands on I would find very difficult.

Agreed - just looking for options since a lot of schools can't seem to grasp the concept that not every student can attend class during normal business hours. :lol:

airfrogusmc wrote in post #16897455 (external link)
The live critiques with professors and other students that are on a fairly similar level as you are one of the most important parts of it all as well as the connections and life long relationships you form.

Exactly. Even though I took two online classes at Bryan Peterson's "school", I did receive critiques from both Bryan and one of his long-time instructors, who also has a thriving photography business. Is it the same as on-campus, in-person critiques? Heck no but it's a start. ;)


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airfrogusmc
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May 12, 2014 11:55 |  #11

No not the same. Live critiques are interaction between you, your peers and the professor is usually there to add some but to make sure that the discussions stay on track and are real learning experience.




  
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May 12, 2014 12:15 |  #12

There is no substitute for being in the room, meeting and interacting with those people. Networking with the people who are in and around the program. If you cant do that, you might as well be self taught at the minor is pretty much a meaningless bit of paper.




  
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